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moscow-street

Blogging

October has been an exceedingly successful. While September was my all time record month (thanks largely to my post on The Idiocy of the Average), with 46,000 unique visits and 154,000 pageviews, this past month came close despite the absence of any viral posts – 37,000 visits and 145,000 pageviews. I am now consistently running at above 1,000 visits per day since early October.

The blog has well more than 50% as many pageviews as in the entirety of 2017, and if I manage to keep pace, we might just come close to a doubling.

You can help increase the chances of that happening here: http://akarlin.com/donations/

Moderation

I am thinking of updating moderation guidelines. For all intents and purposes, they don’t currently exist – as of today a grand total of one person is banned (Wally, for spamming).

That is going to stay constant – on 90% of posts.

However, I also produce the occasional “effortpost” that I want to be citable. I am thinking of explicitly marking them as such, and deleting low-quality comments there, but not anywhere else.

In effect, there will be a moderated, infrequent “K-selected” blog, and an unmoderated “r-selected” blog that is updated daily as today. Let me know what you make of this plan.

***

Featured

* Twitter free speech alternative Gab potentially facing criminal charges because Pittsburgh shooter happened to comment there

* James Thompson: Scientific Racism. Excellent summary.

* Iran sanctions kick in Nov 5 over lack of capitulation. Seems like China has bent the knee to the US (or is looking to extract a better deal from Iran)

* Alpha Centauri Dreams: Could highly unusual ‘Oumuamua asteroid be debris from a technological civilization?

***

Russia

* Ben Aris: Russia preparing wide-ranging Ukraine sanctions in retaliation for incoming US sanctions this autumn

* Russian Arctic sea route shipping more than quadruples in 5 years

* AP on Ukrainian Orthodoxy

* Two thirds of Kazakhstan’s remaining Russians want to leave due to country’s language policies and worsening inter-ethnic relations

* Mikhail Kofman: Russia’s sole aircraft carrier out of commission after deadly accident during repair work

* Latvia passes language law limiting Russian instruction in schools

* POWERFUL TAKE: Representative of Constantinople Patriarch (and reserve officer of the Turkish Army) “threatens” Russian Orthodox Church with revocation of its autocephaly.

* Matfey Shaheen: Schismatic head of Ukrainian Church Folaret blessed a mural with nationalist symbols, SS runes, a priest with an uncanny resemblance to Filaret himself, and St. George slaying a double-headed eagle – the symbol of the Byzantine Empire, you know, the one whose Patriarch recently declared their autocephaly.

***

World

* Rapoza: What to expect from Bolsonaro’s First 100 Days: Privatizations, 20% flat tax, public pensions reform

* New poll of American undergrads reveals more than half afraid to disagree with classmates’ political views, 17% want to repeal First Amendment

* Israel cheerleader Jennifer Rubin claims nationalism seen in Hungary, Poland, Italy is implicitly anti-Semitic

* Iraq’s Christian population plummeted from 1.5 million to just 250,000 since US invasion in 2003

* NYT believes that Bad Orange Man has misplaced priorities:

* Italian gov’t to reward families expecting third child with free land in the south

* Mark Ames: Bellingcat “experts” and US neocons promoted “most influential” recruiter for genocidal Islamic State on Twitter

* MBS in trouble? Power struggle in Saudi Arabia to heat up as younger brother of King Salman returns with US/UK security guarantees

* Venezuela launches sales of “Petro” cryptocurrency

* China produced 108,000 industrial robots in Jan-Sep 2018 – that’s one third of entire US stock of industrial robots

* China cordons off large area of ocean to test robotic warships

* ASPI: Long read: Chinese military sponsored more than 2,500 scientists to study in the West

***

Science & Culture

* Scott Alexander: Sort By Controversial

* Computer neural networks also fooled by optiCal illusions just like humans

* IQ 101:

***

Culture War

* Steve Sailer: As best we know not a single anti-Semitic hate crime has been committed by a right-winger in New York since Trump’s election

* Julia Ioffe is very good at hearing dog whistles.

* GQ magazine journalist literally says anyone who has ever said anything about Soros has “blood on their hands.”

* UN pushing “migration compact” calling to defund media that promotes “xenophobia” and enforce pro-immigrant tone in elections campaigns

* NYT writer calls on American voters to “replace” white nationalists in coming midterms

* Swedish municipality wants public to host immigrants in their own houses

* New UK thinktank report ascribes Islamophobia to Russian trolls

* London police to hire 200 anti-racist “community assessors” as homicide rates in UK capital overtake NY’s

* Study: Brexit supporters prefer realistic art

***

 
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  1. DFH says:

    Thanks for reminding me that Ginnie was still writing articles

  2. AP says:

    1. I think you meant to link to this comment of mine:

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/open-thread-60/#comment-2594877

    2.

    Mikhail Kofman: Russia’s sole aircraft carrier out of commission after deadly accident during repair work

    I’m just noting that if this same thing had occurred in Ukraine the usual suspects would be crowing about how Ukraine is a failed state with a useless military.

    • Replies: @Serrice
    , @Felix Keverich
  3. Mikhail says: • Website

    Paging Bellingcat & Soviet Jewry Reexamined

    https://orientalreview.org/2018/09/24/the-highest-degree-of-certainty-the-new-evidence-in-the-downing-of-flight-mh17/

    ——————–

    In reply to my comments on a recent JRL promoted WaPo article, a Russian based American forwarded the following:

    [MORE]

    Regarding Jews emigrating to Israel, I recall a Soviet anecdote that I read in a book about 25 years ago (the book was published in the Soviet Union).

    A young man M. was being interviewed by a lieutenant L. in OVIR about his application to emigrate to Israel.

    L. It seems you have a very good job here and a decent apartment. Don’t you like your job and living conditions here?

    M. I really enjoy my work, and the living conditions are fine. I will miss my job when I go.

    L. Then why do you want to leave?

    M. Well, I’m not really wanting to leave, but my wife insists that we go.

    L. But you’re a man, aren’t you? Why don’t you just tell your wife that you’re going to stay here.

    M. Of course, I could handle my wife if it were only she. But her parents also insist, and I can’t handle all of them together insisting that we leave.

    L. Well, then why don’t you just let them go and you stay?

    M. Unfortunately, I’m the only Jew in the family.

    The comments which said American was following up on:

    Re: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2018/10/31/strange-twist-fate-now-its-russian-jews-praying-american-jews/?utm_term=.33e807663dff

    Excerpt –

    Like the century before it, the Soviet era was riddled with anti-Semitism. Jews were often discriminated against by the government, from restrictive quotas at top universities to having the equivalent of a letter ‘J’ marked in their internal Soviet passports. Anti-Semitic imagery and slogans were rife and generally accepted by Soviet society.

    Starting in the 1970s, Soviet Jews began leaving for Israel and the West. By the time the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, a 1-million-strong exodus had taken place. The chaotic 1990s saw many more go.

    ****

    More accurately put, the Cold War era saw the USSR take a geopolitically motivated anti-Zionist/anti-Israeli line, which isn’t necessarily anti-Jewish. Somewhat reminded of those who say that being against the Russian government isn’t necessarily anti-Russian.

    Despite the aforementioned restrictions, Jews in the Soviet Union compared socioeconomically well to other ethnic groups in that dictatorship – which adhered to a set of beliefs, known for being theoretically opposed to all religions. The aforementioned restrictions bring to mind the matter of affirmative action in the US and a recent Fox News segment of Harvard University discriminating against Asian applicants.

    If I’m not offhand mistaken, the described Soviet internal passports listed the stated ethnic group of the given person – “J” or otherwise. Zionism supports the idea of a Jewish nation. It has been said that some people of Jewish background in the USSR listed their ethnic identity as something other than Jewish. Soviet census taking allowed the individual to have some leeway on how they wanted to be ethnically listed.

    During the Cold War, there was a noticeable US political activity seeking justice for Soviet Jews. There was also the reality that living conditions in the US and the West in general, was considerably better than in the USSR. At the time, it was understood that the best way to get US approval for entry was to claim being ethnically discriminated against, as opposed to seeking a better economic standing.

    I know a pro-Israeli Jewish attorney who worked for the INS reviewing Soviet Jewish applicants. According to him and some others, a good number of the stories about persecution seem exaggerated, if not completely made up. In addition, there has been second guessing on just how Jewish the background of some (not all) of the applicants.

    I don’t dispute that the USSR, post-Soviet Russia and some other parts of the world have (in varying degrees) what Jeffrey Goldberg described relative to the US.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Goldberg

    BTW, there’re some golf clubs on Long Island that are known for not taking in Jewish members.

  4. Serrice says: • Website
    @AP

    Naval/naval industrial accidents seem some of the most common forms of major accident. I’m not so sure people really care.

    Just look at the US navy, last year they had multiple multi-million dollar ship crashes and the new Zumwalt destroyers keep breaking down. But it doesn’t reflect on the state of the nation or how formidable ths US navy is.

    • Agree: AP
    • Replies: @Hyperborean
  5. Anon[117] • Disclaimer says:

    First, also cite able by who?

    You’re a branded anti Semitic don’t turn shabbos GOY trying to gain respectability fat karlin

  6. notanon says:

    Julia Ioffe is very good at hearing dog whistles.

    past a certain point paranoia becomes self-fulfilling

  7. notanon says:

    Swedish municipality wants public to host immigrants in their own houses

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quartering_Acts

  8. songbird says:

    Nothing on the grand-opening of the insane, giant statue of Sardar Patel?

    To my mind, there is something really weird about building a statue with colossal wrinkles. I mean, I know India needs a unifying figure. Some semi-mythic guy like George Washington. And Mount Rushmore is undoubtedly weird, but Patel’s enormous wrinkles really highlight the weirdness of making a politician into a saint.

    Keep it small is what I’d say. Small statues of George Washington work well, when proles aren’t stealing his sword. I’m not sure about large stuff. Even the Statue of Liberty, which arguably has some aesthetic value, was hijacked for nefarious purposes.

    It is kind of funny how sedate and restrained the statue of Genghis Khan is in comparison. Also, since there are a lot of people with schadenfreude for the collapse of the US for its lack of restraint overseas: do you really think the other juggernaut countries will be better? India just built a 600 ft tall statue of a Patel, for crying out loud. Not that I’m betting on India, but let’s be honest: people are condemning the US for its ability, not for its lack of restraint, which is totally predicated on ability, and which most other countries lack just as much.

    • Replies: @Anon
  9. Anon[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @songbird

    They should buy more nukes instead of statues. Silly Pagans,

    • Replies: @songbird
  10. Something team Trump has for after the mid-terms, to head off any moves toward ‘impeachment’ if the Democrat goons take the USA lower house of Congress

    A much bigger deal than the sexual assault allegations against Mueller this past week – A big filing against Trump-badgering Special Counsel Robert Mueller on 25 October, at the office of the US Department of Justice Inspector General, involving Mueller when he was FBI director – link below

    The report charges Robert Mueller with being a compromised, paid agent of a foreign criminal group – British – involved in US federal corruption, two federal judges bribed, and Mueller and another famous former Special Counsel, Patrick Fitzgerald, selling a ‘comfort letter’ to criminals in the middle of a string of felonies

    Mueller is said to be involved in helping his law firms defraud millions in client funds, and getting a share of this, in a scheme manipulating a crazy Hillary friend and donor

    The filing describes how key anti-Trump media aka ‘Resistance’, are motivated by of fear of indictment in the schemes involving Mueller, how the Boston Globe, New York Times, UK Guardian, CNN took bribes for ‘fake news’ in the Mueller-tied federal corruption scheme –

    It talks about how extradition requests to the USA are being denied, as other governments have files on the crimes involving Mueller – including Russia LOL – with Mueller’s friends at Google hiding the crime scheme on the internet

    Here is the 28-page US Dept. of Justice filing made last week with DOJ Inspector General Horowitz – and Trump’s counsel and Congressional committees – by an ex-DOJ employee who now reports to the EU Commission … fat doc with a lot of stuff in it, quite explosive … it has the ’3rd rail’ topic of US judicial bribery, so it is under the media radar, tho apparently Trump’s lawyers and the Republicans in Congress have it ready to deploy:

    https://www.docdroid.net/eVAAjIq/doj-ig-memo-mueller-bribery-extortion.pdf

  11. Tean says: • Website

    How much is the sinking of PD-50 expected to affect Russian naval operations? When will the Admiral Kunetzov complete its repairs and be back at sea? How good is the SU-57 honestly against the F-35, would it be a good alternative if the F-35 is out of reach?

    • Replies: @Spisarevski
  12. @Tean

    How much is the sinking of PD-50 expected to affect Russian naval operations? When will the Admiral Kunetzov complete its repairs and be back at sea?

    Supposedly it will have to go to Vladivostok once it’s sea worthy, as the Pacific Fleet has the only other dry dock large enough for it.

  13. songbird says:
    @Anon

    Throw in the the planned 190M statue of Shivaji, and it is quite a sum.

  14. @AP

    It is a failed state. As I recall the Ukraine sold its aircraft carrier to China in the early 90s. Chinese paid $20 million. They said they were going to use it as amusement park!

    Regarding Russian sanctions on the Ukraine, Russia is not “preparing” them, sanctions have already been implemented. Here is the list of sanctioned individuals and companies:

    http://static.government.ru/media/files/AHKW1WfDGrhdKbhzH1dkMLZM8gchGjla.pdf

    It appears that chemical and metallurgical industries were hardest hit.

    For what it’s worth Anders Aslund of the Atlantic Council described new Russian sanctions on the Ukraine as “draconian”, saying they’ll have significant impact on Ukrainian economy.

    http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/making-sense-of-russia-s-new-draconian-sanctions-on-ukraine

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Hyperborean
  15. Of course I understand AK’s view re Ukrainian Church. And, of course, I disagree with it. In Orthodox Christian world, Churches are national & it is perfectly reasonable that Ukrainians, being mostly Orthodox Christians, want their own national church. The sooner they get it, the better. And I don’t care about ecclesiological matters, they’re boring….

    Back to more interesting issues: Bolsonaro.

    Rhetorically, the guy is extreme, but it proves what I’ve been thinking all the time- when whites show some backbone, all others don’t count.

    In 50% (even more) black country, he has openly denounced Africans & all other sacred cows (homosexuals, females (not very subtle, but evidently he meant feminism & similar ideologies), leftists, all minorities (sacralization of victimhood),..)- and it worked. Coloreds mostly don’t go to the polls.

    A few observations:

    * his rallies are perhaps 95-100% white (OK, many are dark almost whites, but let’s not be nitpicking…)

    * mass protests against him: young females, college types. Why am I not surprised?

    * gay issue may seem a bit overstretched, but it is a crucial element in culture war

    * praise for the military, order & gun rights.

    With extremely high crime rate, corruption & near collapse of the society due to years of leftist policy & indoctrination, it’s no wonder that Brazilians (even some blacks) have voted for him.

    He promised to crack down on college professors who preach leftism, which is, I must admit, very, very amusing…

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Gerard2
  16. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:

    Daniel Friberg, CEO of Arktos Media and co-founder and co-editor of Altright.com with Richard Spencer, comments on Greg Johnson, founder and editor of Counter Currents:

  17. However, I also produce the occasional “effortpost” that I want to be citable. I am thinking of explicitly marking them as such, and deleting low-quality comments there, but not anywhere else.

    In effect, there will be a moderated, infrequent “K-selected” blog, and an unmoderated “r-selected” blog that is updated daily as today. Let me know what you make of this plan.

    As someone who mostly contributes shitposts to your comment section, I feel threatened and under shadow of persecution like Julia Ioffe in Trump’s America.

    • Agree: Yevardian
    • Replies: @Mikhail
  18. Will the moderated blog be on Unz as well?

  19. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Bardon Kaldian

    The flip side to this:

    Churches are national & it is perfectly reasonable that Ukrainians, being mostly Orthodox Christians, want their own national church. The sooner they get it, the better. And I don’t care about ecclesiological matters, they’re boring….

    Contrary to the non-expert (whether propped here or elsewhere), the established Ukrainian Orthodox Church (UOC) that’s loosely affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate, is in fact quite independent of the latter, with many Ukrainian citizens (whether ethnic Russian, ethnic Ukrainian and otherwise) being okay with its MP status quo – despite pressure from the Kiev regime and the turncoat Filaret – who dramatically changed his view, after he didn’t get a promotion within the Moscow Patriarchate.

    On the subject of national churches, most of them aren’t supportive of the Constantinople Patriarchate acting like a centralized version of the Vatican. The established Ukrainian Orthodox Church didn’t ask for the state in the form of the Kiev regime, as well as the Constantinople Patriarchate to intervene in its affairs.

    Moves like the ones brought up in this piece indicate that the 1992 formed UOC and the Kiev regime could very well lose prospective supporters – if not already evident:

    https://russian-faith.com/news/st-george-slays-double-headed-eagle-sacrilegious-new-icon-ukraine-n1797

    There’s sufficient polling which indicates that numerous individuals within Kiev regime controlled Ukraine aren’t anti-Russian and don’t support Bandera/Bandera like activity. Conversely, the svido preferred polling results are by no means an accurate indicator on how matters will eventually play out. Polls have been known to eventually prove wrong. The results of the 2016 US presidential election being a prime example.

  20. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich

    Regarding Russian sanctions on the Ukraine, Russia is not “preparing” them, sanctions have already been implemented. Here is the list of sanctioned individuals and companies:

    http://static.government.ru/media/files/AHKW1WfDGrhdKbhzH1dkMLZM8gchGjla.pdf

    It appears that chemical and metallurgical industries were hardest hit.

    So Eastern Ukraine where the Russians live is hardest hit, western Ukraine is unaffected. This will accelerate the economic center of gravity in Ukraine’s westward movement.

    For what it’s worth Anders Aslund of the Atlantic Council described new Russian sanctions on the Ukraine as “draconian”, saying they’ll have significant impact on Ukrainian economy.

    Interesting how you present a half-truth to make a claim that is contrary to what was actually written.

    His full opinion:

    “These sanctions will have significant economic impact, though after trade between Russia and Ukraine plummeted by 80 percent from 2012 to 2016 because of tough prior sanctions, Russia’s share of Ukraine’s total foreign trade has fallen to some 12 percent. Another third of Ukraine’s remaining export to Russia will likely disappear, primarily food and agricultural goods, but also some metallurgical products. Since bilateral trade has shrunk so much, Ukraine is becoming increasingly immune to Russian sanctions. “

  21. neutral says:

    That political cartoon about soldiers enlisting to fight in the middle east is beyond surreal. That cartoon is something that the Daily Stormer would itself produce mocking the idea of US soldiers existing to fight in the middle east, but here you have the polar opposite, the NYT, producing this as their propaganda.

    • Replies: @silviosilver
    , @songbird
  22. Mikhail says: • Website

    As an open thread, kudos to the Boston Red Sox for showing that the over-reliance on analytics can be counter-productive – which isn’t to say that analytics should be ditched altogether.

    This matter is somewhat analogous to how some modern day political science courses are big on statistics that to a good extent involve polling. In baseball, analytics spit out the % of probability in a given situation without taking into consideration well found hunches to the contrary (like the pitcher who is pitching in a zone of excellence), plus the fact that analytics rarely, if ever, give a 100% probability scenario.

    Besides, the manner of politically related polling can involve some not so accurate poll taking. Somewhat reminded of the DNA samples Liz Warren used and how she and the test taker of her DNA spun it.

  23. @neutral

    I immediately assumed it was some alt right cartoon when I saw it on Sailer’s. It was only from reading other comments that it dawned on me the NYT actually posted it.

    It does make sense from a Republicans-are-war-mongers point of view. It’s extremely doubtful that the average (gentile) NYT reader would make the connection between mid-east wars and Jewish lobby influence.

  24. songbird says:
    @neutral

    It really seems like satire, until you consider the source.

    The way I think of it: there should be a damned draft, if it is necessary. Of course, I’d favor barbed wire and minefields, since that would require less manpower.

  25. In effect, there will be a moderated, infrequent “K-selected” blog, and an unmoderated “r-selected” blog that is updated daily as today.

    Anatoly, you are hilarious. :)

  26. There’s something particularly sad about Oumuamua.

    Even if an obvious alien wreck drifted into our solar system into the asteroid belt, we probably wouldn’t be able to launch a Rama-style exploration even though it is completely within our technological capabilities simply because of the lack of political will.

    Most likely it’ll just drift away.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @anon1
  27. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    The FT this weekend interviewed Bolsonaro’s new finance minister, a University of Chicago PhD and Pinochet fan.

    Kind of neat how Bolsonaro can just name ministers without having to go through a confirmation process like in the U.S.

  28. Rosie says:

    After the synagogue shooting, certain people around here suggested that hate speech laws might not be a bad idea after all. Being a free-speech absolutist, I queried whether speech about women should be restricted as well, and got no answer.

    I’m gonna start calling this Rosie’s Luck, morbid and unwelcome as it is in this case.

    http://www.occidentaldissent.com/2018/11/03/tallahassee-mass-shooter-was-an-incel-who-raged-against-women-on-youtube/

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Anonymous
  29. Anon[232] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    I wasn’t paying too much attention, but weren’t the certain people more on Sailer’s blog than here?

    That phenomenon was pretty darned funny though.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  30. Rosie says:
    @Anon

    I wasn’t paying too much attention, but weren’t the certain people more on Sailer’s blog than here?

    Yes, (((they))) were.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if certain people attempt to use this crime as a pretext to crack down on “hate speech,” not because they really care about women’s well-being, of course.

  31. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    Free speech is not some right wing principle. It’s a liberal principle, and rightists vary in their liberal inclinations. Some rightists are sympathetic to it, others aren’t, and some simply support it as a temporary expediency and tool with which to combat leftists and remove them from power, and which can be discarded once rightists achieve power.

    • Agree: iffen
    • Replies: @Rosie
  32. @Felix Keverich

    As I recall the Ukraine sold its aircraft carrier to China in the early 90s. Chinese paid $20 million. They said they were going to use it as amusement park!

    They did, it still exists. I see advertisements for it from time to time.

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g311293-d1865169-Reviews-Tianjin_Binhai_Aircraft_Carrier_Theme_Park-Tianjin.html

    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
  33. @Serrice

    Just look at the US navy, last year they had multiple multi-million dollar ship crashes and the new Zumwalt destroyers keep breaking down. But it doesn’t reflect on the state of the nation or how formidable ths US navy is.

    Aside from wasting a lot of money, what if the ships break down during a great power war instead of during peacetime?

  34. Rosie says:
    @Anonymous

    Free speech is not some right wing principle.

    Did I say something to the contrary?

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Rosie
    , @Anonymous
  35. Anon[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    O’Donnell

  36. Rosie says:
    @Rosie

    Did I say something to the contrary?

    Come to think of it, I’m going to qualify this.

    I do think that populism is indeed a right-wing phenomenon, while elitism is left-wing. The Right tends to trust the instincts and adaptations of the people as they evolve over time, eschewing top-down revolutions designed to “improve” the people, or “heal the world” or whatever. It is revolution, now often called “social engineering,” that precipitates the need to restrict “reactionary” or “counterrevolutionary” speech among the common folk.

    This may be a peculiar idea of the right, and I’m kind of thinking out loud, so I’m not committed either way on the question of whether free speech is a right-wing value or not. I only say that I am personally committed to free speech for my own reasons. Specifically, I think any elite worthy of the name must be honest and humble enough to open itself to criticism, even ridicule, by those under its authority.

    • Replies: @songbird
    , @iffen
  37. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    No, you said something to the cuntrary.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  38. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:

    Censoring blog posts is gay and a sign of weakness.

    To delete spam is one thing, but once you start censoring comments it is a slippery slope. I see that guy Wally comment on other authors articles, sure he talks about the Jews a lot. But people have their own view of what the problems are.

    How would you feel if authors took down your comments because you were too nationalist? If you start to censor, people will lose trust in you because we all have our own biases.

  39. Rosie says:
    @Anonymous

    No, you said something to the cuntrary.

    Why do I bother?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  40. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    What? It was just a typo.

  41. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    People have a right to do what they want at their own venue – be it a toilet (figuratively or otherwise) or other things.

    I prefer being as free range as reasonably possible – much unlike some truly blog censoring oafs out there.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  42. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Spisarevski

    Ioffe could very well be the most overrated talking head Russia pundit out there. When considering the hoopla over Megan Kelly’s blackface bit, Ioffe should’ve been axed into near oblivion/oblivion awhile back.

    The preceding comments can be thoroughly backed up, in a way that no JRL court appointed Russia friendly regular can do any better.

  43. @Daniel Chieh

    For all we know, it could be a reconnaissance probe or something similar. In which case it might be better to know nothing about it, our chances against a malevolent or indifferent civilization capable of sending this are close to zero anyway. Though it’d still be better to at least try to find out what is it.

    I think most major powers have the capabilities to send a probe there to take a closer look, it’s beyond me why not one of them reallocated some part of their space budget for this. It’s probably more interesting than any other things currently researched in space (Mars, exoplanets, whatever), and, most importantly, it’s not going to stay here. We have all the time to research Mars, but Oumuamua will just go away and we won’t be able to return to it until much later.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @songbird
  44. @Hyperborean

    I was pretty sure, Chinese had it completed and made it a flagship of their navy.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  45. There’s Project Lyra

    A realistic launch date for a probe would be at least 10 years in the future (2027).

    At that point, the hyperbolic excess velocity is already at 37.4km/s (1400km²/s²) with a mission duration of about 15 years, which makes such an orbital insertion extremely challenging with conventional launches in the absence of a planetary fly-by.

    One potential mission architecture is to make use of SpaceX’s Big Falcon Rocket (BFR) and their in-space refueling technique with a launch date in 2025.

    To achieve the required hyperbolic excess (at least 30 km/s) a Jupiter flyby combined with a close solar flyby (down to 3 solar radii), nicknamed “solar fryby” is envisioned. This maneuver is also known under “Oberth Maneuver”

    The architecture is based on the Keck Institute for Space Studies (KISS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) interstellar precursor mission studies.

    Using the BFR however eliminates the need for multi-planet flybys to build up momentum for a Jupiter trajectory. Instead via direct launch from a Highly Eccentric Earth Orbit (HEEO) the probe, plus various kick-stages, is given a C3 of 100 km²/s² into an 18 month trajectory to Jupiter for a gravity assist into the solar fryby. A multi-layer thermal shield protects the spacecraft, which is boosted by a high-thrust solid rocket stage at perihelion.

    The KISS Interstellar Medium study computed that a hyperbolic excess velocity of 70 km/s was possible via this technique, a value which achieves an intercept at about 85 AU in 2039 for a 2025 launch.

  46. @reiner Tor

    Though in all fairness, it is very likely just a lifeless interstellar asteroid. It’s speed and direction and appearance are all consistent with such an explanation.

    Yet it’s strange that we care so little for the only interstellar object to come our way, especially since it’s so strange, being so dense and oddly shaped.

    • Replies: @notanon
  47. Let me know what you make of this plan.

    A surface-level analysis of how the intertubes work, and thus shitty.

    A cold, hard fact is this: pretty much everyone that’s active online is fucked in the head in some fashion and has trouble with real-world interaction. Thus, to get high-quality opinions online, you need to allow anonymous comments and you need to suppress various cliques and “online personas”. Otherwise, you chase out the sane people and select for those with ‘issues’. I’ve been online since 1994, and you see this cycle everywhere. Ironically, to preserve an online community you need to kill the community-making features.

    • Agree: Yevardian
    • Replies: @notanon
  48. iffen says:

    I am thinking of explicitly marking them as such, and deleting low-quality comments there, but not anywhere else.

    But some of us enjoy the Slavic slugfests.

  49. notanon says:
    @reiner Tor

    Yet it’s strange that we care so little

    our rulers have been anti-space since the moon landings – whitey on the moon wrecks the narrative

    • Replies: @songbird
  50. notanon says:
    @anonymous coward

    interesting point – hence the creativity of 4chan maybe

  51. The biggest blasphemy in the Ukrainian mural is that it’s butt ugly. The artist doesn’t know human (or horse) anatomy and rips off, ironically, Eternal Russia by Ilya Glazunov.

    I wanted to ask how your keto diet’s going? Is it easier or harder to cook and more or less costly to buy products?

  52. songbird says:
    @Rosie

    The Left naturally gloms on to leaders to form cults of personality. It’s part of what makes them so dangerous, and I’d argue it is an evolved behavior – some sort of strategy to reproduce their genes.

  53. iffen says:
    @Rosie

    I only say that I am personally committed to free speech for my own reasons.

    Would those be political or personal reasons?

    Populism can be used by the left or the right. Elites can be either left or right. Free speech derives from the Enlightenment, so its ancestry is on the left. Also, the Enlightenment was key to the emancipation of (((them))). The right (then and now) is hostile to the Enlightenment. The totalitarian left that has been extremely powerful and is becoming more so does not value free speech.

    • Replies: @notanon
    , @Rosie
  54. songbird says:
    @reiner Tor

    I think it would be cool, if there were a race there. It would be quite a technical challenge because not only do you need to catch up to it, but you need to be traveling slow enough when you get to it to get useful info, as well as be close enough to earth, so it will be possible to send it back.

    If there are hundreds of thousands of these things, they should be selected for space propulsion contests. It would be money better spent than NASA’s general budget, the Olympics, or many other things.

    The idea that it could be some sort of test, which, if we pass we will be destroyed, is an interesting sci-fi idea, but really unlikely. If they are malevolent and have the technical knowledge to travel between stars (likely can make von Neumann probes), then they know about us already and we’d be dead already. Of course, maybe it is their pleasure to spread the gay germ and watch things slowly unwind.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
  55. songbird says:
    @notanon

    whitey on the moon wrecks the narrative

    I bet anything that they will send a black man, next time the US lands. It will be “black to the moon”. And if I’m wrong it will be because they send a black woman, but I doubt it. Even in this feminist climate, there is nothing so numinous in the US as a black male.

    • Replies: @notanon
  56. AP says:

    The biggest blasphemy in the Ukrainian mural is that it’s butt ugly

    The one in Ternopil is by and for devout but simple people, what do you expect? The people who go to that church probably don’t divorce, drink too much, use drugs, have decent family size, don’t commit crimes, etc.

    BTW having gone to the church’s website, that mural was not the main one at the church, it was part of a special section within the church devoted to soldiers who gave their lives for Ukraine. That’s why St. George is slaying the two headed (Russian) eagle/dragon, and that’s why Azov’s symbol is in it (as are symbols of other Ukrainian military formations). It’s a memorial mural, where family members can pray for their loved ones who made the ultimate sacrifice. Figures that Russian propagandists would turn it into an example of Nazism or anti-Byzantinism.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Toronto Russian
  57. notanon says:
    @iffen

    Free speech derives from the Enlightenment, so its ancestry is on the left.

    free speech in the US stems from its founding by lots of different non-conformist religious groups

  58. notanon says:
    @songbird

    yes although nowadays there might be a fight over it between the different factions of the SJW coalition

  59. notanon says:

    everyone who believes their arguments are best or who thinks the best arguments should win the public debate should be a free speech absolutist imo

  60. Rosie says:
    @iffen

    The right (then and now) is hostile to the Enlightenment.

    I think the word “hostile” is too strong. Skeptical is better, but probably still just a bit too strong.

    The problem with the Left is not that they value reason, but rather that they value it exclusively and consider it infallible. There is no sense of caution about turning society upside down virtually overnight. Change is seen as good ipso facto.

    The other end of this spectrum is unthinking adherence to tradition, based on the conviction that change is always degenerate and never progressive. The solution, of course, is to undo any historical change and revert to a status quo ante that our ancestors evidently found wanting. To suppose this represents the Right, charitably understood, is IMO to acquiesce to a leftist caricature.

  61. @songbird

    If it is alien, its most likely just a piece of debris or a long-dead probe, both which would be well worth trying to explore and understand. Even if it isn’t, I think its an excellent technical challenge because its well within our capabilities and as Tor mentioned, we have a limited window to accomplish it. Seems like an opportunity that could be easily lost forever.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Nznz
  62. https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=93kol_1541334819

    White Russian teenagers murdering completely defenseless Russian homeless people and drunkards. (NSFW/NSFL – beware, video is incredibly upsetting)

    culture so majestic and attractive that they not only wish to submit, but actually pay for the privilege – A Karlin (2018)

    • Replies: @DFH
    , @Spisarevski
  63. notanon says:

    autistarchy

    (trademarked for future)

  64. DFH says:
    @information so powerful you actually use less

    Were the degenerates who filmed themselves murdering people with hammers Ukrainians or Russians?

  65. @information so powerful you actually use less

    White American police officers murdering completely defenseless American homeless person

    We are blessed and are a blessing to humanity – homosexual ISIS terrorist Jonh McCain (2018)

  66. @Spisarevski

    I just found this story on Facebook (in Hungarian):

    On December 20, 1943, roughly 200 B-24s were bombing Sofia. A captain of the Bulgarian air force, Dimitar Spisarevski, flying a Me-109G, after supposedly having shot down two enemy planes, ran out of ammunition, and rammed his plane into the tail of a B-24. Both planes crashed and their crews died.

    I immediately thought of the only other Spisarevski I ever heard of. Is there a connection?

    • Replies: @Spisarevski
    , @utu
    , @utu
  67. @reiner Tor

    Not a direct one (Spisarevski is not my real family name) but yes, he is the inspiration for my nickname.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  68. @Daniel Chieh

    I can easily write a few science fiction novellas about scenarios where it’s an active probe and why it behaved the way it did. The truth is, we have no idea.

    But since its behavior, direction, etc. are all consistent with it being a natural object, that must be the way to bet. Or that would be the way to bet if the risks (or rewards) were symmetrical, which they are not: if it’s an alien probe, it’d be better to know that. And even if it’s not, it’s not like such interstellar objects come our way every day. This is the first interstellar object in the solar system which we have identified beyond reasonable doubt, and it’s going to leave us pretty soon, so what would we lose if we sent a probe to get a better view?

  69. @Spisarevski

    That’s what I thought.

    I didn’t even know that Bulgaria was part of the air war in 1943. That’s a great story and guy.

    • Agree: Spisarevski
    • Replies: @German_reader
  70. @reiner Tor

    I didn’t even know that Bulgaria was part of the air war in 1943.

    There’s quite a bit about the bombing of Bulgaria in Richard Overy’s The bombing war, if it interests you. Britain and the US basically wanted to force Bulgaria away from its pro-German stance by bombing Sofia.
    One interesting detail in that book is that Bulgaria was one of the pioneers in aerial warfare (together with the Italians in Libya in 1911/12):

    The modern aerial bomb, with its distinctive elongated shape, stabilizing fins and nose-fitted detonator, is a Bulgarian invention. In the Balkan War of 1912, waged by Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia and Montenegro (the Balkan League) against Turkey, a Bulgarian army captain, Simeon Petrov, adapted and enlarged a number of grenades for use from an aeroplane. They were dropped on a Turkish railway station on 16 October 1912 from an Albatros F.2 biplane piloted by Radul Milkov. Petrov afterwards modified the design by adding a stabilized tail and a fuse designed to detonate on impact, and the 6 -kg bomb became the standard Bulgarian issue until 1918. The plans of the so-called ‘Chataldzha’ bomb were later passed on to Germany, Bulgaria’s ally during the First World War. The design, or something like it, soon became standard issue in all the world’s first air forces.

  71. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    A WW II era utilized Nazi emblem is evident as the Russian Faith posted piece aptly notes, with the two headed eagle having a relationship with Orthodox Christianity – inclusive of it being on the flags of two predominately Orthodox Christian states (Serbia and Montenegro) besides Russia. A third country Albania also uses it. Orthodox Christians being the largest Albanian Christian group. At one time, Albanians were mostly Orthodox Christian.

    The mural also depicts the living Filaret – something that has a cult like megalomaniac quality.

    In any event, that mural highlights the politicized manner of the 1992 Filaret formed church – something that many Orthodox Christians in the former Ukrainian SSR don’t agree with. A truly democratic and stable society isn’t run by a state which favors one divisively problematical side over the other in the manner of Poroshenko.

    • Replies: @AP
    , @AP
  72. @AP

    If they’re simple people it’s not an excuse to dupe them with bad painting.
    For comparison, this is decent pro-Ukrainian art. Political? Yes, it even has a graffiti cursing Putin in it. Ugly or lazy? No.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @AP
  73. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Toronto Russian

    Used in a non-religious setting, which is more universally agreeable than the other example.

    “Pro-Ukrainian” to be equated with anti-Russian and/or anti-Putin, further explains the divisive svido manner – something not discouraged when others uncritically spin in the same way.

  74. Nznz says: • Website
    @Daniel Chieh

    In space no one can hear you scream.

  75. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    A WW II era utilized Nazi emblem is evident

    You are doing what American leftists do and take images out of their context to whine about them. Such as this latest non-event:

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/tanyachen/idaho-school-district-costumes-facebook

    The reality is simple: a mural was made to honor people who had died fighting for their country, and this mural included symbols of the units in which these people fought. And it included the symbol of the enemy against whom they had fought.

    Pro-Nazi, or anti-Orthodox, are your inventions. Hope you enjoy being triggered.

    he two headed eagle having a relationship with Orthodox Christianity – inclusive of it being on the flags of two predominately Orthodox Christian states

    It’s kind of funny to hear this particular whine about the picture, given that Russia has actually, you know, rejected Constantinople itself.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  76. @Anonymous

    It’s not so much that Wally talks a lot about the Jews as that he ONLY talks about the Holocaust and posts the same link to CODOH.com. EVERY COMMENT

  77. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    Russia and for that matter a noticeable portion of Ukraine, as well as most of worldwide Orthodox Christianity haven’t rejected Constantinople, in the sense of acknowledging the latter as the locale of Orthodox Christianity’s roots. For good reason, that recognition doesn’t include accepting someone in Constantinople carrying on like he’s some Pope.

    The mural depicts the WW II Nazi era symbol used by Azov – no ands, ifs or buts.

    The enemy you describe are overwhelmingly from the territory of the former Ukrainian SSR – ethnic Ukrainians, ethnic Russians, as well as a mix of the two and some other former Soviet ethnic groups.

    In comparison, the established Ukrainian Orthodox Church (not the 1992 Filaret formed variant) takes a noticeably less partisan stance on the conflict concerning Donbass.

    Making a propaganda poster in a non-religious context is one thing. That’s not the case with the mural at issue, which also includes a still living Filaret – whose sudden change of attitude towards the Moscow Patriarchate came after he didn’t get a promotion within its ranks. His presence in that mural has a cultist megalomaniac like dynamic.

    • Replies: @AP
  78. AP says:
    @Toronto Russian

    If they’re simple people it’s not an excuse to dupe them with bad painting.

    I agree with you with respect to the aesthetics. Though worse things happen. In Spain simple devout people seem to regularly desecrate works of sacred art:

    https://www.cnn.com/style/article/spanish-church-restorer-st-george-intl-trnd/index.html

  79. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    as well as most of worldwide Orthodox Christianity haven’t rejected Constantinople, in the sense of acknowledging the latter as the locale of Orthodox Christianity’s roots. For good reason, that recognition doesn’t include accepting someone in Constantinople carrying on like he’s some Pope.

    So you reject the Patriarch of Constantinople but then get triggered and whine about a mural showing a two-headed dragon/eagle being speared and how it insults Orthodoxy. Very funny.

    Making a propaganda poster in a non-religious context is one thing. That’s not the case with the mural at issue

    Insofar as celebrating and honoring people who have died for their country is a “propaganda poster.”

    Meanwhile in Russia:

    http://www.asianews.it/news-en/Controversy-in-Moscow:-Stalin-icon-revered-19792.html

  80. Mikhail says: • Website

    Idiotic follow-up:

    So you reject the Patriarch of Constantinople but then get triggered and whine about a mural showing a two-headed dragon/eagle being speared and how it insults Orthodoxy. Very funny.

    The two-headed eagle is very much tied to Orthodox Christianity, much unlike Bart’s Pope like move.

    Insofar as celebrating and honoring people who have died for their country is a “propaganda poster.”

    Doesn’t in anyway negate the point that differentiates between such imagery appearing as a propaganda poster in a non-religious setting and the locale of the mural at issue – which definitely qualifies as propaganda, regardless of political persuasion. As an example, I’ve pro-Russian, Russo-Japanese War propaganda posters and acknowledge them as propaganda – despite my sympathy with Russia in that conflict.

    Sense that most of the Kiev regime forces in Donbass aren’t from that specific area – adding how Motyl and some others (perhaps you) have said it’s not worth fighting over. In Motyl’s s case, he has said that it’s worth letting go.

    • Replies: @AP
  81. anon1 says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    An arms race kind of development can happen real fast if an alien tech wreck can be reasonably believed. I think. Hard to believe otherwise.

    Lack of political will is kind of a lame concept, IMHO. People on the other side do not lack poli will. They simply disagree with you. Actually they have enough will to resist you even if your side is winning by the rule.

  82. I’d like to know what Anatoly thinks about “KGB Whistleblower” Vasili Mitrokhin?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswsjj

    I heard this brief BBC item about him. It ascribes his betrayal of the Soviet Union’s KGB to his “Russian patriotism”, which could make sense in a minority-Russian Soviet Union run by non-Russians. Yet by the time Mitrokhin got around to delivering his laboriously accumulated data haul to the West, the Soviet Union was collapsing in favor of a majority-Russian Russian Federation run by Russians.

    So it looks like a tragedy that this Russian nationalist painstakingly created a poison pill for the Soviet Union only to end up administering it to the renascent Russia he was trying to liberate. But the BBC didn’t treat it as a tragedy. They treated it as a triumph.

    The paradox of why the normally Russophobic and anti-nationalistic BBC was celebrating a “Russian patriot” as hero could be explained this way: he scored an own-goal. Of course the Beeb left that little fact out.

    Anyway, no one can trust the BBC, but Mitrokhin’s story sounds interesting, so I would like to hear from an actual Russian about it. Also, it has some analog to American dissenters against the US Deep State, e.g., Snowden.

  83. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mikhail

    This isn’t Anatolys venue. It is Unz venue and Anatoly is a guest. If Anatoly takes his articles to his own website then I agree.

    Unz has set the bar for intellectual bravery. His recent set of articles have made him a target and Unz does not censor, so why would Anatoly need to when his articles are no where near as inflammatory? Unz does not censor Wally or anyone else.

    If Anatoly starts to scrub comments, then Anatoly should forego any Patreon funds that go Unz because no one else on here that I know of censors comments.

    • Replies: @Nznz
    , @Mikhail
  84. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    The two-headed eagle is very much tied to Orthodox Christianity

    Silly ignoramus, it’s tied to the idea of Empire – Austria-Hungary, Russia, Byzantium, Mamluk and Seljuk Sultanates all used it. Guess which specific Empire is the focus of the church mural?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-headed_eagle

    In heraldry and vexillology, the double-headed eagle is a charge associated with the concept of Empire. Most modern uses of the symbol are directly or indirectly associated with its use by the Roman/Byzantine Empire, whose use of it represented the Empire’s dominion over the Near East and the West. The symbol is much older, and its original meaning is debated among scholars. The eagle has long been a symbol of power and dominion.

    The double-headed eagle motif appears to have its ultimate origin in the Ancient Near East, especially in Hittite iconography. It re-appeared during the High Middle Ages, from circa the 10th or 11th century, and was notably used by the Byzantine Empire, but 11th or 12th century representations have also been found originating from Islamic Spain, France and the Serbian principality of Raška. From the 13th century onward, it became even more widespread, and was used by the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum and the Mamluk Sultanate within the Islamic world, and by the Holy Roman Empire, Serbia and Russia within the Christian world.

    Used during the late Byzantine Empire as a dynastic emblem of the Palaiologoi, it was adopted during the late Medieval to Early Modern period in the Holy Roman Empire on one hand, and in Orthodox principalities Serbia and Russia on the other, representing an augmentation of the (single-headed) eagle or Aquila associated with the Roman Empire.

    ::::::::

    So you insult the Patriarch of Constantinople but get triggered by a double headed eagle getting speared on a mural in a church, because you stupidly believe that the double-headed eagle is a symbol of Orthodox Christianity.

    Symbols of various Empires:

    Austria-Hungary:

    Seljuk:

    • Replies: @AP
    , @Mikhail
  85. Nznz says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    With all due respect to Sailer, him saying that homosexuality is a degeneracy or that pride parades should be banned in California or Texas, or him saying that the Trump should have a policy of strip mining Mexico of its white population, or allowing Wally to post on his blog, would have far more serious consequences for him, considering where he lives, than for Karlin to say the same.

  86. AP says:
    @AP

    So you insult the Patriarch of Constantinople but get triggered by a double headed eagle getting speared on a mural in a church, because you stupidly believe that the double-headed eagle is a symbol of Orthodox Christianity.

    Should be “you stupidly believe that the double-headed eagle is exclusively a symbol of Orthodox Christianity”

    In addition to the symbol of Russia, Austria-Hungary, the Seljuk Turks, etc. it is of course also a symbol of the Greek Church.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  87. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    Idiot:

    https://www.crwflags.com/fotw/flags/gr_byz.html

    That some others have used it doesn’t negate its relationship with Orthodox Christianity.

    Regardless, a propaganda mural like the one under discussion serves to nurture further division in the historically/culturally diverse former Ukrainian SSR territory – even with Donbass and Crimea omitted.

    • Replies: @AP
  88. Mikhail says: • Website

    For those seemingly, if not out-rightly thinking that Belarus might go against Russia:

    https://sputniknews.com/europe/201811041069496920-belarus-russia-poland-us-base/

  89. utu says:
    @reiner Tor

    On December 20, 1943, roughly 200 B-24s were bombing Sofia.

    One would think they had higher priority targets in late 1943 than Sofia.

    Which base did they fly form?

    • Replies: @for-the-record
  90. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    The mural also depicts the living Filaret – something that has a cult like megalomaniac quality.

    He is not on the mural at all:

    It depicts various people who died in the struggle against Russia/Russkyi Mir. He isn’t one of them.

    It’s not the most attractive mural, but the church overall is rather impressive:

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  91. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Scrub a dub a dub, three men in a tub. The input from Wally is nothing particularly of substantive value.

    Him aside, it can be really asinine to see what some venues choose to prop over qualitatively better input. An example:

    http://russialist.org/russia-ukraine-johnsons-russia-list-table-of-contents-jrl-2018-189-monday-29-october-2018/

    From that link, one of the JRL court appointed Russia friendly regulars – in this case an anonymous blogger with a Sovok (Soviet nostalgic) leaning:

    https://awfulavalanche.wordpress.com/2018/10/28/russians-react-to-megyn-kelly-firing-part-ii/

    Excerpt -

    Next please read this piece by Natasha Bertrand, which brings out some of the links between American white supremacists and “Putin’s Russia”. Natasha is a Russia-hating Hillary-whore who is into Syrian regime change and flirts with jihadists. I hate her, and I would love to prove all of her statements anti-factual, but unfortunately I can’t. It is factually true that Richard Spencer is a Russophile who has described the Russian Federation as “The sole white power in the world“. Is that really the tag that Russia wishes to bear? Like it says in the Bible, “You are judged by the friends you keep.”

    That characterization of Bertrand is noticeably different from what I’ve said about people thinking along her lines. Regarding the subject matter about Putin’s Russia and white supremacists:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/07/12/more-mumbo-jumbo-on-russia.html

    Excerpt -

    Hillary Clinton’s not too distant outburst in Ireland ranks with some of the most inaccurate things said about Putin. According to her “Vladimir Putin has positioned himself as the leader of an authoritarian, white supremacist and xenophobic movement that wants to break the EU, weaken America’s traditional alliances and undermine democracy. We can see this authoritarian movement rippling out from the Kremlin, reaching across Europe and beyond. It’s emboldening right-wing nationalists, separatists, racists and even neo-Nazis.”

    Some white supremacist, seeing how Putin has been reaching out to the leaders of China, Japan and South Korea, in addition to Russia being part of the BRICS bloc, that includes South Africa, India, Brazil and China. Putin isn’t primarily responsible for the breakdown in Russia-West relations. Rather, he has sought a policy for Russia to have good ties with the West and others. The relatively small nation of Saudi Arabia outspending Russia on armed forces is one of several examples indicating that the “Russian threat” theme is overhyped BS.

    That some extremists in the West might see Putin as a kind of great white hope isn’t his doing. BTW, Russian extremists aren’t so supportive of Putin because they know that he’s the opposite of what Hillary Clinton said.

    McFaul, Ioffe, Figliuzzi, Peters and Clinton, constitute a partial sampling of the fault ridden, Russia related commentary.

    ****

    Upon further reading, the above linked Strategic Culture Foundation article provides examples concerning what’s said in the excerpt about McFaul, Ioffe, Figliuzzi, Peters and Clinton, without using a word like whore.

    Mind you that the JRL editor has been known to lecture some on appropriate manner.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  92. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    So you insult the Patriarch of Constantinople but get triggered by a double headed eagle getting speared on a mural in a church, because you stupidly believe that the double-headed eagle is a symbol of Orthodox Christianity.

    Term it how you want, an insult and/or criticism, his manner concerning the Ukrainian Orthodox Church is a reasoned basis for me to say what I have.

  93. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    I’m glad that you have finally learned that Byzantium used a two headed eagle as its symbol. But did you know it was not only them?

    That some others have used it doesn’t negate its relationship with Orthodox Christianity.

    But it negates your stupid claim that depicting a two-headed eagle getting speared is some sort of anti-Orthodox picture when is obvious this symbol is not exclusive to Orthodoxy. It is a symbol of Empire, and Byzantium is only one empire out of many empires to have used that symbol. Russia used. Austria-Hungary used. Spain used it, when it was ruled by Hapsburgs. The Suljuk Turks used it.

    In the case of the mural that triggered you, the two headed eagle refers to Russia. Not Byzantium. Not Mount Athos which also used a two headed eagle. Not Austria-Hungary, or the Seljuk Empire.
    Just Russia. Have you figured that out yet?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  94. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    Okay, he’s in another one as shown:

    https://russian-faith.com/news/st-george-slays-double-headed-eagle-sacrilegious-new-icon-ukraine-n1797

    Takes some chutzpah for someone living to go along with something like that – especially regarding religion.

    Yes, it’s a beautiful church, thereby making such depictions all the more repugnant. Believe what you want, there will be a good number in Ukraine understandably turned off by such depictions in a church as opposed to a non-religious venue.

    • Replies: @AP
  95. utu says:
    @reiner Tor

    On December 20, 1943, roughly 200 B-24s were bombing Sofia.

    One would think they had higher priority targets in late 1943 than Sofia.

    Which base did they fly form? What was the chain of decision when unusual target was selected? What about Monte Cassino?

    “There is no respect for sanctuary in a German curriculum of war” is a line form WWII propaganda film (see at 5:08) explaining the bombing of the Benedictine monastery on Monte Cassino

    More recently propaganda organ of the same machine that produce the above film came up with another cop out:

    Error led to bombing of Monte Cassino

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2000/apr/04/johnezard

    In discussion that followed expectedly the Cathedral in Coventry was mentioned.

  96. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    I’m glad that you have finally learned that Byzantium used a two headed eagle as its symbol. But did you know it was not only them?

    I already knew that. It’s especially utilized among Orthodox Christians. That Russia is the intended specific target of that propaganda mural doesn’t make it so acceptable – especially in a religious setting. The 1992 Filaret formed church comes across as being more politically motivated than the established Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

  97. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mikhail

    Wally isn’t the point. One person sets the example with Wally. The next person picks their own thing they don’t like to censor.

    Then you have different groups from different authors unable to make points. If Anatoly is so bothered by comments he should turn them off them like Colburn did.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
    , @Nznz
  98. Mikhail says: • Website

    On the subject of Ukrainian Orthodox Christianity, there’s a Ukrainian Orthodox Church near me. A Kharkov born Ukrainian acquaintance tells me that the services and church’s contents are non-political, adding that the church’s congregants have different views on the situation in the former Ukrainian SSR. This Ukrainian acquaintance happens to be in general agreement with me, as is true with numerous other Ukrainians (varying ages and from different parts of Ukraine at that) who I’ve been in contact with. I’ve run into my share of the opposing Ukrainian view as well.

    I know two Russian Orthodox Christians (one is a Kiev born Moscow based ethnic Ukrainian and the other is US born of White Russian aristo background) familiar with that church. They both like its congregants.

    Mixing overtly svido views into a religious experience works against the idea of seeking a more stable and unified situation.

  99. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Wally isn’t the point. One person sets the example with Wally. The next person picks their own thing they don’t like to censor.

    You were the one who brought him up. I think there can be a reasonably enough objective understanding of what qualifies as better analysis deserving of a higher profile placement, when compared to the status quo of petty personal slights and phony, crony, baloney favoritism.

    On this very matter, Wally isn’t relevant.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  100. Joach says:

    What does this say?

  101. Nznz says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    To be fair you can post the Holocaust is real and your sources all day on codoh and you won’t get banned.

  102. @utu

    Which base did they fly form?

    Foggia, Italy (15th Air Force).

    Here is an interesting article on the defence mounted by the Bulgarian Air Force, including the heroics of our friend Spisarevski.

    https://warisboring.com/outnumbered-and-outgunned-the-bulgarian-air-force-battled-the-allies-over-sofia/

  103. Dmitry says:

    Oops I think I might have scared Talha away, talking to him about the life after death and how (if you believe in it) you might be judged.

    He seems to be a nice guy. But without being impolite, I think he was here preferring to talk what he called “alt-right people” on other parts of the website as they are kind of weak spirits and strengthen his acculturated viewpoints (it’s like talking to kids, makes you feel more intelligent). Talk to people who challenge a bit, and it can be more stressful.

    • Replies: @German_reader
  104. Gerard2 says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Of course I understand AK’s view re Ukrainian Church. And, of course, I disagree with it. In Orthodox Christian world, Churches are national & it is perfectly reasonable that Ukrainians, being mostly Orthodox Christians, want their own national church. The sooner they get it, the better. And I don’t care about ecclesiological matters, they’re boring….

    Dumb idiot…….there is no excuse for Belarus, Russia and Ukraine having separate churches because they are the same people with the same shared cultures and language
    Hence why no problem with Gruzian, Armenian,Bulgarian church and so on having different nation churches, because they are clearly different nations and cultures. Ukraine clearly isn’t.

    Understand how ridiculous this farce is to separate the churches by nation when looking at how each of Ukraine,Belarus and Russia celebrate the baptism of Vladimir..areas packed out, not to mention that they all make the same statues to the same people revered in Orthodoxy…completely different to how and who different orthodox churches revere.

    Not to mention who built, paid for and looked after those famous beautiful churches in Ukraine, from which “Ukraine” gets much of its culture, identity, spirituality, tourism(limited)..and BTW that there is no such thing as Ukrainian ‘architecture” should also give the game away

    • Replies: @AP
  105. @Dmitry

    Oops I think I might have scared Talha away

    He’s written over a million words on Unz review, it’s not surprising that he’s losing interest, especially since he’s got children and wants to be more active in his religious community (which is probably more fulfilling than to debate infidel weirdo strangers on the net). So I don’t think it’s your fault. It’s just the nature of such comments sections, commenters come and go.
    Anyway, while I’ve disagreed vehemently with Talha’s views, I have to admit that he was admirably patient in discussions and provided some interesting insights. So I wish him all the best.

  106. songbird says:

    The thing about Brexit supporters preferring realistic art isn’t surprising to me.

    It’s obvious that political viewpoints, even among the undecided, are pretty hard-wired, which is just what you’d expect from the heritability of other attributes.

    What is really amazing is that there doesn’t seem to be a single political system that takes into account this most profound, basic, and demonstrable psychological truth. One cannot expect it on the policy end because there is not even an acknowledgement of it built structurally into the system.

    We seem doomed to bitter politics, to fight over vast fortunes which will, despite the fighting, be burnt on the alter of egalitarianism.

  107. Anonymous[396] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mikhail

    Actually Anatoly is the one who brought him up.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  108. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Either way, he’s no poster boy for the image of a competently valid source getting unfairly censored, in place of more biased and/or overall subpar input.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  109. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    Okay, he’s in another one as shown:

    https://russian-faith.com/news/st-george-slays-double-headed-eagle-sacrilegious-new-icon-ukraine-n1797

    Takes some chutzpah for someone living to go along with something like that – especially regarding religion.

    So you admit that Filaret is not on that mural that he blessed.

    The other, alleged, mural on which he is shown does not appear on the websites affiliated with that church, such as this one:

    http://cerkva.te.ua/patriarh-filaret-vidvidav-svyato-preobrazhenskyj-sobor-m-krementsya-na-ternopilshhyni/

    In fact, the only place it seems to appear is on Russian nationalist websites. While I’d have to go to that church to rule out that the mural with Filaret is in that church, there’s a good chance that it is fake news.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  110. AP says:
    @Gerard2

    Many were built by Mazepa. Here is a bishop of the Moscow Church praising Mazepa:

    https://risu.org.ua/en/index/expert_thought/comments/29071/

    The Russian Church excommunicated this church-builder and sponsor of the Church, but the Constantinople Church rejected this:

    https://risu.org.ua/en/index/all_news/culture/history/72689/

    The Ecumenical Patriarchate never recognized the canonical anathema that was imposed on the Ukrainian Hetman, Ivan Mazepa, by the Russian Orthodox Church.

    The representative of the Ecumenical Patriarchate at the World Council of Churches in Geneva, Archbishop Job (Getcha) of Telmessos said this in in an interview with Glavkom.

    According to him, it was imposed on the hetman for political reasons. “Despite the impossibility of imposing the non-canonical anathema on Hetman Mazepa on the part of the Russian Church, the representatives of the Ecumenical Patriarchate did not recognize it, since it was imposed for political motives as a means of political and ideological repression and did not have any religious, theological or canonical grounds,” he said.

    Archbishop Job explained that after the first demolition of the Zaporizhia Sich by the Russian troops in 1709, the Ukrainian Cossacks, which passed under the protectorate of the Crimean Khan, returned to the jurisdiction of the Patriarchate of Constantinople, and Mazepa, along with Pylyp Orlyk, were among the first to do so.

    “Having emigrated to Bendery, Ivan Mazepa freely confessed to Orthodox priests of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. They consoled him on his deathbed and absolved his sins, and then performed a burial service for him. His body was buried in the Orthodox church of the town of Varnitsa, which was under the jurisdiction of the Ecumenical Patriarchate, and subsequently reburied in the city of Galats on the Dunai River, where in the central cathedral of St. George Monastery the local metropolitan served a burial for the reposed Hetman. This Metropolitan was the hierarch of the Ecumenical Patriarchate. Consequently, we can say that Ivan Mazepa died as a faithful of the Mother Church, the Ecumenical Patriarchate!” the Hierarch of the Ecumenical Patriarchate emphasized.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  111. Mikhail says: • Website

    Consequently, we can say that Ivan Mazepa died as a faithful of the Mother Church, the Ecumenical Patriarchate!” the Hierarch of the Ecumenical Patriarchate emphasized.

    Mazepa died as someone who betrayed the predominately Orthodox Christian entity that backed him. He chose to throw in his lot with Sweden and its weaker Polish ally, figuring they’d prevail over Russia. The majority of the forces on the territory which had been under Mazepa’s authority (as a part of the Russian Empire) chose to not support his betrayal.

  112. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    vidomosti.kiev.ua:

    Good chance that the Russian Faith piece’s portrayal isn’t inaccurate.

    • Replies: @AP
  113. AP says:
    @Mikhail

    Yup. Looks like a mural over the church entrance:

    The writing at the top indicates honoring historical and Church figures significant in the history of Orthodoxy in Ukraine. Filaret is named in the bottom right.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  114. Mikhail says: • Website
    @AP

    So, it’s in a main part of a church, which is out of line – at least for a good number, familiar enough with such a matter. Offhand, don’t know of any established church (not considered as having cult tendencies towards a living individual) with a high profile mural depicting a living figure at or near his level.

    At issue is a church for svidos, versus those not necessarily subscribing to Filaret’s turncoat manner.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  115. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Looks like all of the parishioners are content with the depiction of personages within the mural. So why all of the melodrama, Mickey? Why do you even care? Are you of Ukrainian descent or even an Orthodox Christian? It’s up to the Ukrainian people to decide how they wish to worship God and what form of governance they prefer, not up to some neurotic New York city crusader for Putin’s Russia (read: Kremlin Stooge) to decide for them.

    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    , @Mikhail
  116. @Mr. Hack

    It’s up to the Ukrainian people

    No such thing.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  117. Mr. Hack says:
    @anonymous coward

    So, who are all of these folks, Blindman?

  118. So, who are all of these folks, Blindman?

    Galicians mixed with a deracinated Russian-speaking sovok biomass.

  119. Mr. Hack says:

    A whole lot of them, I can see.

  120. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Either way, he’s no poster boy for the image of a competently valid source getting unfairly censored, in place of more biased and/or overall subpar input.

    Learn some English writing skills, Mickey. I know 5th graders that can put together a more coherent sentence than you. It’s no wonder that you’ve never learned Russian, you’re still struggling with English.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  121. See, I knew he’d come around. Faster than I thought, actually. Rather amused.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/r-brazils-bolsonaro-welcomes-chinese-investment-trade-2018-11

    Brazilian right-wing President-elect Jair Bolsonaro said on Monday that China is welcome to invest in Brazil and that trade between the two countries could grow.

    Bolsonaro’s remarks in a television interview contrasted with his portrayal of China on the campaign trail, when he depicted it as a predator seeking to dominate key sectors of Brazil’s economy. Chinese diplomats met with Bolsonaro on Monday and want him to visit the Asian country as soon as possible, he said.

    • Replies: @Mitleser
  122. Can someone read it?

    I think it means that the Americans know exactly where the Russians subs are located. This means that the Americans would be at a considerable advantage in a war.

    https://militaryarms.ru/novosti/amerikancy-vidyat-rossijskie-submariny/

    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
  123. Mitleser says:
    @Daniel Chieh

    See, I knew he’d come around.

    You mean like DJT whose first broken promise was not naming the PRC a currency manipulator?

    We’ll see whether this is going to last or not.

    • Replies: @songbird
  124. songbird says:
    @Mitleser

    Bill Clinton famously did a 180 on China, but to be turned around, you have to at least be bold enough to profess some antagonism first. That probably shortens the list.

  125. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    Typical svido troll, offering zero substantive criticism, when making a negatively inaccurate comment about a source which he can’t successfully debunk.

  126. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    Svidos like such. Nothing new there. However not everyone on the territory of the former Ukrainian SSR (ethnic Russian, ethnic-Ukrainian, mixed) goes along with that faulty spin.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  127. @reiner Tor

    Perhaps they started doing the same thing as the Soviets were apparently doing:

    This is probably the most contentious claim I’m going to make here, but I assure you it’s true. In the late 1960s, the Soviets developed an optical device that could measure the turbulence created by the passage of a submarine. This device was mounted to a Victor class SSN and used to trail an American SSBN near Guam for several hours with only intermittent sonar contact (they had to tell it was an American boomer, after all). The improved SOKS device mounted on the Improved Victor IIIs, Akulas, Sierras and later Soviet SSNs measured many other parameters like temperature, conductivity, radioactivity and turbulence. SOKS was used to trail the newest American SSNs and SSBNs (Los Angeles and Ohio classes) almost completely non-acoustically.

    The Soviets also developed a space-based strategic ASW system to track American submarines. There were several technologies at play. The most widely used were optical and radar sensors that scanned the ocean for scars produced by the passage of a submerged submarine. There were also lasers that could measure the turbulence of the water remotely. Thermal emissions were tracked as well as night-time bioluminescence made by frightened plankton, jellyfish and ctenophores when the submarine disturbed them. By the end of the Cold War, the Soviets were into their third generation of ASW satellite and the detection of American submarines from space was routine. Progress was underway to sync the satellites up to ICBM batteries that could destroy US SSBNs in time of war. Although the Russians had their budget slashed after 1991, R&D on submarines and ASW has continued at Soviet-level funding.

    The reason this is a problem for US submarines is two-fold. First, US submarines create a lot of turbulence. The shape of their sails and control surfaces creates a lot of vortices, which are a large component of the turbulence that the Russians can detect. Russian submarines are much more streamlined and special care has been taken to eliminate all vortices (that’s why the Boreis’ sails look so weird). New Russian submarines also have grates that thoroughly mix the hot water coming from their powerplants into the cool ocean water, reducing their thermal signature. The second problem for the US is that most in the submarine community regard non-acoustic ASW as a myth. The CIA was aware of it during the Cold War, but the submarine community in general is in denial about the whole thing.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/WarshipPorn/comments/2gby88/russian_k329_severodvinsk_a_yasenclass_nuclear/

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  128. @Anatoly Karlin

    Possible, though I think the article contained a few other complaints from Russian officers.

  129. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    not everyone on the territory of the former Ukrainian SSR (ethnic Russian, ethnic-Ukrainian, mixed) goes along with that faulty spin.

    They don’t have too. Every society should allow its citizenry the right to worship the All Mighty as it sees fit. You betray your real sovok roots by trying to insist on a one size fits all church/synagogue/mosque/house of prayer being directed from Moscow. It may be the way it’s done in Russia, but not in Ukraine.

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  130. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    That’s what Porky, Filaret and the UGCC are trying to do regarding the UOC.

    If anything, Svidos are more Sovok like, with their seeking to maintain the Communist created borders f the Ukrainian SSR.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  131. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    That’s what Porky, Filaret and the UGCC are trying to do regarding the UOC.

    Can you point to any churches that have been confiscated by the President or the Patriarch? As I understand it, individual churches will be allowed to maintain their current orientations or change directions based on parishioner preference. Seems democratic enough to me (and pretty much the same as its been in the past).

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  132. ussr andy says:

    OT
    ON AUTISM

    I was watching a documentary about a plane catastrophe and there was an image sequence with a guy speaking about how he lost his daughter in it and the next sequence showed him in his restaurant preparing some marine animal like a lobster.

    I was scrolling through the comments and stumbled upon a comment to the effect that it’s ironic the guy is killing the lobster all the while complaining about his daughter’s death.

    Naturally, I went on my desktop computer to type an angry response from an anonymous account. I wrote that, no, it was not ironic at all to anyone who was not a morally confused psychopath who put animals on the same level as people, or people on the same level as animals, which in my view amounted to the same thing.

    (I also wanted to write that I want people like the OP stripped of their driving license because I don’t want people out there on the roads for whom the choice whether to run over a person or a frog presents an insurmountable moral dilemma, but then decided to leave well enough alone.)

    Then I thought if I wasn’t perhaps too harsh. For all I know, the person could be autistic (as autism often goes hand in hand with moral autism), but the post had several likes all of which couldn’t have come from autists but must have been from people (like vegans) genuinely agreeing.

    My point is the following:

    The normalization of femo-homo is nothing compared to the normalization of autism. We’re already supposed to call them neuro-special or something like that.

    I don’t necessarily mean autism, the identity, I mean the whole mentality (moreso as the autists who identify or were diagnosed as such are harmless by virtue of being non-functional, whereas the functional autists (Kasparov, say) don’t necessarily identify as autists and aren’t harmless. I suspect that many SJWs, practically every leapfrogging-loyalties type person or fellow-white-people person is at some level autistic and we know that from their moral autism, sanctimony and lack of self-awareness.)

    Autists are industrious and indefatigable and meticulous and at the same time morally autistic (and as a consequence, endlessly susceptible to propaganda), docile, ultra-conformist and they don’t ask questions (such as why do my 6 hours off-work consist of receiving food through tubes while being hooked to a VR machine.)

    There’s a question-and-answer-type website I’m on and there’s a guy who’s apparently some sort of Asian-American (sorry) who always asks autistic-sounding questions about human interactions, the meanings of common expressions and set phrases etc. (And English isn’t the most high-context language, actually, it’s very low-context and its metaphors are pretty self-explanatory (“a rose by any other name” etc.)) He’s also some of the most POZzedest members there.

    Suppose there was an evil world government whose endgame for humanity was a kind of a global anthill (“Communism: good ideology, wrong species” – E.O.Wilson), then autists would be its ideal citizens. And their endgame is just that.

  133. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Mr. Hack

    Filaret and Porky have made clear their preference for one Ukrainian Orthodox Church (UOC), subscribing to their slants. In conjunction with that goal, Filaret has also called for the established UOC to brand itself as a Russian Orthodox Church, which in the nationalist influenced Kiev regime, is a kind of modern day version of the Nazi era gold star on Jews (of course not being the exact same).

    Once officially called the Russian Orthodox Church, the “legality” for further persecuting the established UOC can be better explained away. Outside agitators not affiliated with the established UOC have been known to seek taking over property from the former.

    In Belarus, the Orthodox Church there is known as the Belarusian Orthodox Church, while being affiliated with the Moscow Patriarchate. As previously noted at these threads and elsewhere, Estonia has two Orthodox churches.

    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
  134. A Russian military base is going to be opened in Cuba. I hope it’ll be cheaper than the last time around.

  135. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    Once officially called the Russian Orthodox Church, the “legality” for further persecuting the established UOC can be better explained away. Outside agitators not affiliated with the established UOC have been known to seek taking over property from the former.

    Who are these outside agitators? Can you provide any examples? Or, is this just another case of you hearing this from some (unnamed) ‘reliable’ sources (voices in you head)?

    • Replies: @Mikhail
  136. Mr. Hack says:
    @Mikhail

    The kind of stuff depicted in these news articles seems over the top to me. It shows that the level of mistrust and suspicion by the pro government side is volatile. After more than 3 years of war with pro-Russian separatists, many Ukrainians undoubtedly feel that the UOC(MP) is a hotbed of fifth columnist activity – whether this view is right or not. I would hope that this conflict in Ukrainian society could be resolved peacefully, with both sides respecting the rights of the other.

  137. Mikhail says:

    Besides the linked pieces, there’re others saying the same. If the content in these articles are so false, you can be sure that “StopFake” would be pouncing on them.

    It’s more over the top to say that the Kiev regime and Poroshenko are representing a free to choose diversity.

    As for “fifth columnist activity” (which can be understood to mean as not adhering to a particular slant), the established UOC is nowhere near as political as the 1992 Filaret formed church, which plays to anti-Russian leaning elements in Kiev regime controlled Ukraine and beyond.

  138. Mikhail says: • Website

    The use of “fifth columnist activity“ can within reason be interpreted to mean not adhering to a certain slant.

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