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imperial-russian-bliny

Rediscovering the Russian Imperial traditions.
Bliny on sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy, served with sour cream, salmon, and red caviar at the apartment of a Finn whose family maintained the Imperial traditions.

I will be departing for Romania very early tomorrow. Any last tips/recs? I’ll be two days in Ploiesti for two days, in Transylvania for three (castles & hiking), and in Bucharest for five.

Before anyone asks, I am traveling to the wedding of one of my best friends (who also happens to be a recognizable name amongst Alt Right intellectuals). So no, I’m not going just because I have nothing else to do with my money, which is unfortunately rather limited.

But reminder that you can help change that: http://akarlin.com/donations/

***

Featured News

* Alexander Mercouris: Italy’s crisis and the crisis of democracy in Europe (best take on Italy)

* How Worried Should We Be about an Italian Debt Crisis?

In related news, gap between Italian and German bond yields widest since 2013:

germany-italy-spreads

* Ron Unz: Why The American Conservative Purged Its Own Publisher. I outlaid some of my thoughts in the comments. Found little surprising about it, though its good to be reminded not and then of the depths of cuckservative mendacity.

* PEW: Being Christian in Western Europe

Based Portugal. SWEDEN YES!

poll-national-identity-by-countrry

PS. Eastern Europe polls on religion here.

* Gregory Hood – Why Aztlán Matters. Interesting observations on the building of a new nation. How prevalent? (h/t Thorfinnsson for the tip that Gregory Hood is now at Amren).

* Gregory Hood: Steve Bannon: Quit Boosting Martin Luther King. Will cuckservatives take this advice? A rhetorical question.

* Jonathan Anomaly – 2008 – Defending eugenics

* Audacious Epigone: Hear, O Israel. Generation Zyklon much less Israelophilic than the boomers. So are the Latin immigrants.

generation-zyklon-on-israel

The Epigone in the comments:

One of my first experiences with the ADL was a report they put out in the early 2000s highlighting the high levels of ‘anti-semitism’ among foreign-born settlers in the US from Latin America. But even in the very report there was no anti-immigration sentiment expressed–they just need more education!

* Longtime readers will now I am positive on Ethiopia (relative to Africa in general).

Tyler Cowen was there and has some comments: Will Ethiopia be the next China?

Ethiopia also had a relatively mature nation-state quite early, with the Aksumite Kingdom dating from the first century A.D. Subsequent regimes, through medieval times and beyond, exercised a fair amount of power. Most important, today’s Ethiopians see their country as a direct extension of these earlier political units. Some influential Ethiopians will claim to trace their lineage all the way to King Solomon of biblical times.

In other words, the process of organized, national-level governance has been underway for a long time. It was this relative strength of Ethiopian governance that allowed the territory to fend off colonialism, a rare achievement. It is also why, when you travel around the country, a lot of the basic cuisine doesn’t change much: Dishes are seen as national and not regional…

Like many Iranians, they think of themselves as a civilization and not just a country. They very self-consciously separate themselves from the broader strands of African history and culture. And, as in China, they hold an ideological belief that their country is destined to be great again.

My impression is that Ethiopians have less Afrocentric svidomism than e.g. Nigerians.

Also: Ethiopian food in Ethiopia

* The history of the world every year:

***

Russia

* Update on the Babchenko story (for those not following the comments): He’s alive. Whole thing was a setup.

Could have been a Ukrainian provocation to undermine Russia’s World Cup that went awry. But perhaps it’s far more banal. The proposed killer (who went straight to the SBU) was a Ukrainian nationalist and Right Sector member. The contractor was the owner of a weapons factory who supplied the ATO. It would be hilarious if this was actually a straight out corporate raid.

* Double standards (Western journalist reactions to real assassination of Oles Buzina vs. fake assassination of Babchenko):

* On this note, interesting account from KP journalist Dmitry Steshin: D uring a Facebook debate with him while Steshin was in Slavyansk, Babchenko asked him for his location so that he could better target the artillery on him.

That said, Babchenko is – if this is true – someone who has actively tried to get other journalists killed.

* Share of Russian goods in Russian retail rises from a 56% in 2013, to 65% in 2017. Quality improves.

* Map of where Russians pay by card (green), or withdraw money from their cards (red). The usual north/south division. Crimea is probably redder than it should be due to some combination of the legacy of Ukrainian backwardness and Western sanctions.

map-russia-money-vs-card

***

World

* Commenter Polish Perspective on the Swedish nationalist scene

* Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.

Foreign workers will be allowed to stay in Japan for five years under a new framework that covers five industries — agriculture, construction, lodging, nursing and shipbuilding.

* Food (in)security in 2017:

* The insanity of Maoist economics:

* Map of Internet penetration in Europe, via /r/europe. Italy can into Eastern Europe. Poland was beginning to do better on these sorts of maps.

map-europe-internet-penetration

* Analysts need to be made to predict things, publicly.

* Irish abortion referendum: Very few differences by geography, income, etc.; cardinal differences by age cohort.

irish-abortion-referendum

***

Science & Culture

* Why does Elon Musk have to become sympathetic only when he’s (possibly) on the verge of ruin? Anyhow, I fully support this journalist ratings website. RateMyJourno.

* Another week, another GWAS on IQ.

Gail Davies, Max Lam, […]Ian J. Deary (2008) – Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function

* Berezin, Alexander (2008) – “First in, last out” solution to the Fermi Paradox

No present observations suggest a technologically advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI) has spread through the galaxy. However, under commonplace assumptions about galactic civilization formation and expansion, this absence of observation is highly unlikely. This improbability constitutes the Fermi Paradox. In this paper, I argue that the Paradox has a trivial solution, requiring no controversial assumptions, which is rarely suggested or discussed. However, that solution would be hard to accept, as it predicts a future for our own civilization that is even worse than extinction.

* Costs/benefits of PGD (discussion)

***

Powerful Takes

* More on Russian origins of the Great Pyramids:

* I didn’t ask for this.

* Good political science take:

* Boris N. takes a brief break from his boycott of the Internet.

take-kebabs-like-tropics

***

 
• Category: Miscellaneous • Tags: Ethiopia, False Flag Attack, Italy, Open Thread 
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  1. My impression is that Ethiopians have less Afrocentric svidomism than e.g. Nigerians.

    They don’t need to since they’ve got a real history of continous civilization. And they even defeated the Italians in open battle during the latters’ first attempt at colonization in the 1890s.

    The polls about ancestry as requirement for truly belonging to the national community are interesting…and very surprising to me, since at least in Germany the churches are extremely anti-national and among the biggest supporters of Merkel’s open borders policy.
    Sweden…lol, what’s going on there? Are they really that brain-washed or so conformist that people don’t express their true sentiments?
    The polls about US sentiments towards Israel are also fascinating, I wouldn’t have suspected that so many Americans have a negative view of Israel (even 20% of Jews view it as a “threat”?). That has interesting implications for the future. If there’s a war against Iran that ends in disaster, I could imagine Israel being blamed for it and in the end being left with very few friends even in the US.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird

    The polls about US sentiments towards Israel are also fascinating
     
    Anytime the US acts in Israel's interests, Jews sell it as Evangelicals determining policy. It seems obvious to me though, that it has other origins. I bet anything that Jews contribute more money to both parties than Evangelicals do to either. When the Jewish pundit on TV is saying "Evangelicals", it seems like a rather thin veneer. I expect many Jews in Congress will lose their seats due to the demographic transition, so many of them have sought, but I don't expect policies to actually change because they aren't democratic to start with.
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  2. songbird says:

    Only 26% of church-going people in Sweden link ancestry with national identity? Are these mostly Nigerians? Or did they conflate “mosque” with “church”, or are normal Swedish churches really are crazy as that?

    Read More
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  3. Mikhail says: • Website

    A worthy open thread issue concerns JRL/Paul Robinson promoted Keith Gessen:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/31/opinion/ovechkin-babchenko-putin-golden-knights.html

    Absolutely no mention of the horrid fate facing journalists in Kiev regime controlled Ukraine – having nothing to do with Russia and a good deal with the influence of nationalist anti-Russian elements, seeking to eliminate pro-Russian sentiment in Ukraine.

    As a comparison, the Russian situation doesn’t seem worse. As one example: if I’m not mistaken, the Kremlin didn’t make a concerted effort to ban the recent UEFA Champions League final played in Kiev. Compare that instance to the Kiev regime seeking to ban World Cup telecasts in Ukraine.

    An earlier Keith Gessen moment:

    Re: http://russialist.org/sean-guillory-comment-on-keith-gessens-the-quiet-americans-behind-the-u-s-russia-imbroglio/

    Enough already! At his blog, Sean Guillory states that David Johnson asked him to submit a piece concerning Gessen.

    Like Gessen is really needed to state what has been otherwise obvious – a point relating to this piece:

    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2017/10/11/slanting-against-russia-us-establishment-pastime.html (non-JRL promoted)

    Contrary to Paul Robinson, Keith Gessen isn’t so radically different from his more well known sister Masha. The latter has said that too much hype has been given to the notion that the Russian government greatly interfered in the 2016 US presidential election. Ultimately, both Gessens have an overall slant against mainstream Russian views – thereby explaining why Keith got the nod by The NYT to run his much discussed piece.

    Regarding “the paper of record”:

    https://www.eurasiareview.com/09062016-enhanced-russia-bashing-at-the-new-york-times-analysis/ (non-JRL promoted)

    Read More
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  4. 20% of US Jews say Israel poses a threat to the US – I am impressed!

    Read More
    • LOL: Anatoly Karlin
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  5. songbird says:

    Every time that I hear Africa compared to China, I laugh out loud.

    My favorite formulation is the basic “Is Africa going to be the next China?” But I enjoyed them all – Djibouti being compared to Singapore is also one I treasure.

    Cowen is pretty bold to drop the interrogative and one-up with the humorous phrase “China of Africa.”

    Read More
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  6. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    My impression is that Ethiopians have less Afrocentric svidomism than e.g. Nigerians.
     
    They don't need to since they've got a real history of continous civilization. And they even defeated the Italians in open battle during the latters' first attempt at colonization in the 1890s.

    The polls about ancestry as requirement for truly belonging to the national community are interesting...and very surprising to me, since at least in Germany the churches are extremely anti-national and among the biggest supporters of Merkel's open borders policy.
    Sweden...lol, what's going on there? Are they really that brain-washed or so conformist that people don't express their true sentiments?
    The polls about US sentiments towards Israel are also fascinating, I wouldn't have suspected that so many Americans have a negative view of Israel (even 20% of Jews view it as a "threat"?). That has interesting implications for the future. If there's a war against Iran that ends in disaster, I could imagine Israel being blamed for it and in the end being left with very few friends even in the US.

    The polls about US sentiments towards Israel are also fascinating

    Anytime the US acts in Israel’s interests, Jews sell it as Evangelicals determining policy. It seems obvious to me though, that it has other origins. I bet anything that Jews contribute more money to both parties than Evangelicals do to either. When the Jewish pundit on TV is saying “Evangelicals”, it seems like a rather thin veneer. I expect many Jews in Congress will lose their seats due to the demographic transition, so many of them have sought, but I don’t expect policies to actually change because they aren’t democratic to start with.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    I don't know, if there's a war against Iran (which seems like a real possibility), the Jewish angle will be hard to cover up, given how Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer etc. have literally bought influence with Trump and other politicians. And since such a war will probably end in a catastrophe, I could even imagine the US becoming seriously antisemitic as a reaction.
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  7. @songbird

    The polls about US sentiments towards Israel are also fascinating
     
    Anytime the US acts in Israel's interests, Jews sell it as Evangelicals determining policy. It seems obvious to me though, that it has other origins. I bet anything that Jews contribute more money to both parties than Evangelicals do to either. When the Jewish pundit on TV is saying "Evangelicals", it seems like a rather thin veneer. I expect many Jews in Congress will lose their seats due to the demographic transition, so many of them have sought, but I don't expect policies to actually change because they aren't democratic to start with.

    I don’t know, if there’s a war against Iran (which seems like a real possibility), the Jewish angle will be hard to cover up, given how Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer etc. have literally bought influence with Trump and other politicians. And since such a war will probably end in a catastrophe, I could even imagine the US becoming seriously antisemitic as a reaction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    I dunno. There wasn’t such a reaction to the Iraq War.
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  8. DFH says:

    Will Ethiopia be the next China?

    I wish I was a big-brained libertarian so I could have takes this intelligent

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I could see Ethiopia being the next Malaysia or Mexico perhaps. Current progress looks quite good. Nilotics are an intermediate racial type and Ethiopia has a long history of civilization. Ethiopia's semiarid highland geography also reduces disease burden and parasite load.

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn't seem to be blackness, but rather ethnic conflict and typical emerging market issues.
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  9. Vapin’ Jack’s clown car has committed its most grievous sin yet–suspending Wild Goose 999, the world’s foremost anti-shitbull activist.

    Twatter must be stopped!

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  10. Bliny on sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy, served with sour cream, salmon, and red caviar at the apartment of a Finn whose family maintained the Imperial traditions.

    The return of the capital to Moscow from St. Petersburg perhaps further depressed the presence of salmon in elite Russian cuisine, as Moscow is not near any salmon fisheries.

    It’s my understanding that in Soviet times lots of seafood regarded in the West as being very high quality (Atlantic and sockeye salmon, king crab, etc.) was simply canned and sold as a commodity. Tragic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. @DFH

    Will Ethiopia be the next China?
     
    I wish I was a big-brained libertarian so I could have takes this intelligent

    I could see Ethiopia being the next Malaysia or Mexico perhaps. Current progress looks quite good. Nilotics are an intermediate racial type and Ethiopia has a long history of civilization. Ethiopia’s semiarid highland geography also reduces disease burden and parasite load.

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn’t seem to be blackness, but rather ethnic conflict and typical emerging market issues.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    The difficulty of any HBD-optimism with regard to Ethiopia is that Somalia is very close to Ethiopia, and so Somalis are probably quite similar to Ethiopians. Of course, geography is not necessarily everything. Irish Travelers and Irish are basically the same people split off about 500 yrs. from each other, and yet they possibly have genetically-based behavioral differences.
    , @DFH
    It might be the next Malaysia in the sense of a Chinese minority supervising native grunt work, which is what the Ethiopian 'manufacturing boom' consists in. But doubtless they will get pogromed eventually, like Asian minorities usually do in Africa.


    Ethiopia has a long history of civilization
     
    The fabled Ethiopian civilisation was sub-Mesoamerican tier

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn’t seem to be blackness,
     
    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.
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  12. Mitleser says:

    * Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.

    Foreign workers will be allowed to stay in Japan for five years under a new framework that covers five industries — agriculture, construction, lodging, nursing and shipbuilding.

    What would you suggest him to do instead of accepting more immigration?

    Foreign construction workers like Hoang are becoming a familiar sight in Japan. Like other industries in a rapidly aging Japan, the construction business is desperate for labor. A third of the country’s construction workers are 55 or older, with those aged 29 or younger totaling just 11%. As baby boomers retire, the labor shortage — in construction and in the wider economy — is bound to become more acute.

    The unemployment rate stands at 2.5%, the lowest level in 25 years. There are now 1.59 jobs for every job seeker, the highest ratio since 1974.

    No industry is feeling the effect of aging more than the farm sector, where the average worker is 67, and 60% are 65 or older. Most of their children have left for the city in search of better-paying office work.

    https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/Famous-for-its-resistance-to-immigration-Japan-opens-its-doors

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    There is nothing wrong in principle with importing foreign labor, as long as one prevents any roots from being established. It is very easy on a technical level. The only difficulty is willpower, and the Japanese seem to have the willpower.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    There's a number of things Japan could do in the short-term, aside from the obvious (automation):

    -Abandon noncompetitive agriculture, which currently absorbs 3% of the labor force (triple the rate in the United States)

    -Sweeping deregulation of services, particularly retail, to increase abysmal productivity in the sector

    -End unproductive "education" and put most teens into the labor force

    -More with prefabricated, manufactured buildings

    -Stop demolishing 30-year old structures

    -Increase the retirement age, and use government compulsion to increase the fitness level of the elderly to keep them in the labor force

    -"Export substitution"--allow in more manufactured goods to free up manufacturing workers (probably not a good idea, but it's on the table)

    -More efforts to reduce the mortality rate

    Long term of course Japan needs to end women's rights, eliminate "dating" and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda.

    Trouble with the long term is it's just that...long. Even if the entire yellow sharia program were implemented today, you wouldn't have any new workers for a dozen years (I doubt kids under 12 are useful for much labor these days).
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I was going to say something snarky about how massive, unexpected technological transfer to China was totally okay to me, but looking at it, it seems that they're largely low-paying jobs so it'll be focused on SEA guest workers(individuals mentioned in the article were Indonesian and Vietnamese). It should be interesting.
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  13. @Thorfinnsson


    https://www.unzcloud.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/imperial-russian-bliny.jpg

    Bliny on sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy, served with sour cream, salmon, and red caviar at the apartment of a Finn whose family maintained the Imperial traditions.
     
    The return of the capital to Moscow from St. Petersburg perhaps further depressed the presence of salmon in elite Russian cuisine, as Moscow is not near any salmon fisheries.

    It's my understanding that in Soviet times lots of seafood regarded in the West as being very high quality (Atlantic and sockeye salmon, king crab, etc.) was simply canned and sold as a commodity. Tragic.

    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile – in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    What? You mean blini (блины)?

    Damn, you really sound like a foreigner when you're talking like that. There is nothing wrong with Russian blini. You can make them with sugar and salt if you like. And you can eat them with jam once they are ready (mixing strawberry jam with milk and flour, and then cooking sounds like a really strange idea to me).

    Tell me, what is your opinion of dill? Does this herb taste strange to you? lol

    , @Anonymous
    Has black caviar consumption declined in Russia now that the world's beluga sturgeon are mostly farmed in China?
    , @Thorfinnsson


    he Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.
     
    Vegetable oil wasn't just a Soviet obsession. The industry was after all developed in North America, with disastrous health consequences.

    Adolf Hitler was also a vegetable oil enthusiast.

    Modernizing regimes generally favored vegetable oils on the grounds of economy.

    Food really does seem to be an area where one wants to follow Taleb's maxim of only consuming Lindy-tested commodities.


    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    According to FAOSTAT Russia is the world's #1 producer of buckwheat, and the Ukraine is #3. I assume this isn't just a post-Soviet phenomenon.

    Did the Soviets have some other use in mind for buckwheat?

    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    Besides, wheat doesn't make for bad-tasting pancakes. Crepes and Nordic pancakes (almost the same thing) are simply made with wheat flour, eggs, and milk. North American flapjacks are more or less the same thing with the addition of a leavening agent.

    I am surprised the Finns served strawberry jam instead of lingonberry jam.
    , @reiner Tor
    They destroyed culinary traditions in Hungary, too. It’s being restored, but before, say, 2008, there really was not a single good restaurant in Budapest.
    , @utu

    The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.
     
    The obsession with vegetable fat goes back to when sunflowers were introduced to Russia.

    Sunflowers, a unique connection to Lent and Orthodox Russia
    https://www.desertsun.com/story/life/home-garden/maureen-gilmer/2015/02/28/sunflowers-unique-connection-lent-orthodox-russia/23744987/
     
    , @anonymous coward

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.
     
    Freezing fish roe is an absolute travesty. Only 'American Cheese' can be compared in sheer, mind-boggling blasphemy.

    Visit the Far East (Sakhalin/Kamchatka) and try some real fish roe.
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  14. Anonymous[257] • Disclaimer says:

    I will be departing for Romania very early tomorrow. Any last tips/recs? I’ll be two days in Ploiesti for two days, in Transylvania for three (castles & hiking), and in Bucharest for five.

    I want to know more about the success rates of using pick up artist techniques on Romanian women compared to other Central and Eastern European countries.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  15. songbird says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I could see Ethiopia being the next Malaysia or Mexico perhaps. Current progress looks quite good. Nilotics are an intermediate racial type and Ethiopia has a long history of civilization. Ethiopia's semiarid highland geography also reduces disease burden and parasite load.

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn't seem to be blackness, but rather ethnic conflict and typical emerging market issues.

    The difficulty of any HBD-optimism with regard to Ethiopia is that Somalia is very close to Ethiopia, and so Somalis are probably quite similar to Ethiopians. Of course, geography is not necessarily everything. Irish Travelers and Irish are basically the same people split off about 500 yrs. from each other, and yet they possibly have genetically-based behavioral differences.

    Read More
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  16. songbird says:
    @Mitleser

    * Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.
     

    Foreign workers will be allowed to stay in Japan for five years under a new framework that covers five industries — agriculture, construction, lodging, nursing and shipbuilding.
     
    What would you suggest him to do instead of accepting more immigration?

    Foreign construction workers like Hoang are becoming a familiar sight in Japan. Like other industries in a rapidly aging Japan, the construction business is desperate for labor. A third of the country's construction workers are 55 or older, with those aged 29 or younger totaling just 11%. As baby boomers retire, the labor shortage -- in construction and in the wider economy -- is bound to become more acute.
     

    The unemployment rate stands at 2.5%, the lowest level in 25 years. There are now 1.59 jobs for every job seeker, the highest ratio since 1974.
     

    No industry is feeling the effect of aging more than the farm sector, where the average worker is 67, and 60% are 65 or older. Most of their children have left for the city in search of better-paying office work.
     
    https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/Famous-for-its-resistance-to-immigration-Japan-opens-its-doors

    There is nothing wrong in principle with importing foreign labor, as long as one prevents any roots from being established. It is very easy on a technical level. The only difficulty is willpower, and the Japanese seem to have the willpower.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    What? You mean blini (блины)?

    Damn, you really sound like a foreigner when you’re talking like that. There is nothing wrong with Russian blini. You can make them with sugar and salt if you like. And you can eat them with jam once they are ready (mixing strawberry jam with milk and flour, and then cooking sounds like a really strange idea to me).

    Tell me, what is your opinion of dill? Does this herb taste strange to you? lol

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dressed_herring

    This took me quite awhile to get used to, I remember. I miss it now, its nigh impossible to find in the States.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    I thought it was spelled bilyni in English, but actually I was just mistaken.

    Borsch is spelled borscht. Former is correct in Russian, but latter is correct in English. I can hardly insist on spelling Kyiv as "Kiev" and Ukraine as "the Ukraine" unless I myself scrupulously stick to established rules.
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  18. @Mitleser

    * Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.
     

    Foreign workers will be allowed to stay in Japan for five years under a new framework that covers five industries — agriculture, construction, lodging, nursing and shipbuilding.
     
    What would you suggest him to do instead of accepting more immigration?

    Foreign construction workers like Hoang are becoming a familiar sight in Japan. Like other industries in a rapidly aging Japan, the construction business is desperate for labor. A third of the country's construction workers are 55 or older, with those aged 29 or younger totaling just 11%. As baby boomers retire, the labor shortage -- in construction and in the wider economy -- is bound to become more acute.
     

    The unemployment rate stands at 2.5%, the lowest level in 25 years. There are now 1.59 jobs for every job seeker, the highest ratio since 1974.
     

    No industry is feeling the effect of aging more than the farm sector, where the average worker is 67, and 60% are 65 or older. Most of their children have left for the city in search of better-paying office work.
     
    https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/Famous-for-its-resistance-to-immigration-Japan-opens-its-doors

    There’s a number of things Japan could do in the short-term, aside from the obvious (automation):

    -Abandon noncompetitive agriculture, which currently absorbs 3% of the labor force (triple the rate in the United States)

    -Sweeping deregulation of services, particularly retail, to increase abysmal productivity in the sector

    -End unproductive “education” and put most teens into the labor force

    -More with prefabricated, manufactured buildings

    -Stop demolishing 30-year old structures

    -Increase the retirement age, and use government compulsion to increase the fitness level of the elderly to keep them in the labor force

    -”Export substitution”–allow in more manufactured goods to free up manufacturing workers (probably not a good idea, but it’s on the table)

    -More efforts to reduce the mortality rate

    Long term of course Japan needs to end women’s rights, eliminate “dating” and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda.

    Trouble with the long term is it’s just that…long. Even if the entire yellow sharia program were implemented today, you wouldn’t have any new workers for a dozen years (I doubt kids under 12 are useful for much labor these days).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Japanese government is too traditionalist to accept and execute such radical measures, but not traditionalist enough to ensure that they have Japanese children.
    , @Erik Sieven
    "Long term of course Japan needs to end women’s rights, eliminate “dating” and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda."
    that's the most important point, though I would avoid natalist policies and propaganda.

    Apart from that I would simply do nothing concerning the shortage of workers. Just let the market work. Rising loans for workers would mean a incentive to stop useless academic education. Finally be ready to accept a decline in material wealth.
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  19. Anonymous[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    Has black caviar consumption declined in Russia now that the world’s beluga sturgeon are mostly farmed in China?

    Read More
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  20. DFH says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I could see Ethiopia being the next Malaysia or Mexico perhaps. Current progress looks quite good. Nilotics are an intermediate racial type and Ethiopia has a long history of civilization. Ethiopia's semiarid highland geography also reduces disease burden and parasite load.

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn't seem to be blackness, but rather ethnic conflict and typical emerging market issues.

    It might be the next Malaysia in the sense of a Chinese minority supervising native grunt work, which is what the Ethiopian ‘manufacturing boom’ consists in. But doubtless they will get pogromed eventually, like Asian minorities usually do in Africa.

    Ethiopia has a long history of civilization

    The fabled Ethiopian civilisation was sub-Mesoamerican tier

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn’t seem to be blackness,

    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.
     
    AFAIK that was mostly when they had a Commie government.
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  21. @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    he Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.

    Vegetable oil wasn’t just a Soviet obsession. The industry was after all developed in North America, with disastrous health consequences.

    Adolf Hitler was also a vegetable oil enthusiast.

    Modernizing regimes generally favored vegetable oils on the grounds of economy.

    Food really does seem to be an area where one wants to follow Taleb’s maxim of only consuming Lindy-tested commodities.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    According to FAOSTAT Russia is the world’s #1 producer of buckwheat, and the Ukraine is #3. I assume this isn’t just a post-Soviet phenomenon.

    Did the Soviets have some other use in mind for buckwheat?

    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    Besides, wheat doesn’t make for bad-tasting pancakes. Crepes and Nordic pancakes (almost the same thing) are simply made with wheat flour, eggs, and milk. North American flapjacks are more or less the same thing with the addition of a leavening agent.

    I am surprised the Finns served strawberry jam instead of lingonberry jam.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    I think its most common use is in kasha. Really basic stuff:

    https://i0.wp.com/russianrecipebook.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Buckwheat-Kasha.jpg

    PS. According to relatives, buckwheat was not entirely trivial to get in the USSR, even in Moscow. One more achievement of socialist economics.
    , @for-the-record
    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    More formally, gallettes de sarrasin; where I lived (southern France) they were generally called called crêpes au sarrasin -- "buckwheat" is sarrasin, having been brought back from the Middle East by the Crusaders.
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  22. @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    They destroyed culinary traditions in Hungary, too. It’s being restored, but before, say, 2008, there really was not a single good restaurant in Budapest.

    Read More
    • Agree: Yevardian
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  23. LatW says:

    Buckwheat is paleo since it’s a seed, not a grain. Ukraine should make gift baskets with soba noodles and buckwheat blossom honey and sell to the Japanese.

    Read More
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  24. Mitleser says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    There's a number of things Japan could do in the short-term, aside from the obvious (automation):

    -Abandon noncompetitive agriculture, which currently absorbs 3% of the labor force (triple the rate in the United States)

    -Sweeping deregulation of services, particularly retail, to increase abysmal productivity in the sector

    -End unproductive "education" and put most teens into the labor force

    -More with prefabricated, manufactured buildings

    -Stop demolishing 30-year old structures

    -Increase the retirement age, and use government compulsion to increase the fitness level of the elderly to keep them in the labor force

    -"Export substitution"--allow in more manufactured goods to free up manufacturing workers (probably not a good idea, but it's on the table)

    -More efforts to reduce the mortality rate

    Long term of course Japan needs to end women's rights, eliminate "dating" and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda.

    Trouble with the long term is it's just that...long. Even if the entire yellow sharia program were implemented today, you wouldn't have any new workers for a dozen years (I doubt kids under 12 are useful for much labor these days).

    Japanese government is too traditionalist to accept and execute such radical measures, but not traditionalist enough to ensure that they have Japanese children.

    Read More
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  25. inertial says:

    Incidentally, twitter user labeled “Ластик и Абырвалг” is Valentina Lisitsa, a pianist with eight fingers on each of her hands.

    (especially starting from around the 6th minute.)

    Read More
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  26. @Mitleser

    * Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.
     

    Foreign workers will be allowed to stay in Japan for five years under a new framework that covers five industries — agriculture, construction, lodging, nursing and shipbuilding.
     
    What would you suggest him to do instead of accepting more immigration?

    Foreign construction workers like Hoang are becoming a familiar sight in Japan. Like other industries in a rapidly aging Japan, the construction business is desperate for labor. A third of the country's construction workers are 55 or older, with those aged 29 or younger totaling just 11%. As baby boomers retire, the labor shortage -- in construction and in the wider economy -- is bound to become more acute.
     

    The unemployment rate stands at 2.5%, the lowest level in 25 years. There are now 1.59 jobs for every job seeker, the highest ratio since 1974.
     

    No industry is feeling the effect of aging more than the farm sector, where the average worker is 67, and 60% are 65 or older. Most of their children have left for the city in search of better-paying office work.
     
    https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/Famous-for-its-resistance-to-immigration-Japan-opens-its-doors

    I was going to say something snarky about how massive, unexpected technological transfer to China was totally okay to me, but looking at it, it seems that they’re largely low-paying jobs so it’ll be focused on SEA guest workers(individuals mentioned in the article were Indonesian and Vietnamese). It should be interesting.

    Read More
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  27. @Thorfinnsson


    he Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.
     
    Vegetable oil wasn't just a Soviet obsession. The industry was after all developed in North America, with disastrous health consequences.

    Adolf Hitler was also a vegetable oil enthusiast.

    Modernizing regimes generally favored vegetable oils on the grounds of economy.

    Food really does seem to be an area where one wants to follow Taleb's maxim of only consuming Lindy-tested commodities.


    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    According to FAOSTAT Russia is the world's #1 producer of buckwheat, and the Ukraine is #3. I assume this isn't just a post-Soviet phenomenon.

    Did the Soviets have some other use in mind for buckwheat?

    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    Besides, wheat doesn't make for bad-tasting pancakes. Crepes and Nordic pancakes (almost the same thing) are simply made with wheat flour, eggs, and milk. North American flapjacks are more or less the same thing with the addition of a leavening agent.

    I am surprised the Finns served strawberry jam instead of lingonberry jam.

    I think its most common use is in kasha. Really basic stuff:

    PS. According to relatives, buckwheat was not entirely trivial to get in the USSR, even in Moscow. One more achievement of socialist economics.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    I think its most common use is in kasha
     
    From English Wikipedia:

    The largest gross consumption per capita is in Russia, with 15 kg (33 lb) per year followed by Ukraine, with 12 kg (26 lb) per year.[1]
     
    More proof of the bogus nature of the Ukraine. :)

    And now for the Swedish presentation.

    https://www.recipetineats.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Salmon-Gravlax-8.jpg

    https://assets.marthastewart.com/styles/wmax-1500/d46/martha-cooking-school-preserving-gavlax-cs2009/martha-cooking-school-preserving-gavlax-cs2009_horiz.jpg?itok=UCimWt4G

    Served without fail at every holiday and special occasion throughout my childhood.

    My mother gave me the "secret" family recipe she inherited recently. Of course the version I came up with myself is better. My mother throws an amazing party and is the hostess with the mostess, but she never could cook.

    There's a great similarity of cuisine between the Germanic countries and the Slavic ones (not counting the South Slavs). Probably just down to geography, though no doubt some historical factors come into play as well.

    Tired: Slavs are untermenschen
    Wired: Slavs are disciplined warriors who will bear any burden and pay any price for victory

    Inspired: Germanic-Slavic hybrids are the true master race

    https://pmchollywoodlife.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/barron-trump-dresses-up-for-dinner-ftr.jpg?w=620
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  28. @Felix Keverich

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    What? You mean blini (блины)?

    Damn, you really sound like a foreigner when you're talking like that. There is nothing wrong with Russian blini. You can make them with sugar and salt if you like. And you can eat them with jam once they are ready (mixing strawberry jam with milk and flour, and then cooking sounds like a really strange idea to me).

    Tell me, what is your opinion of dill? Does this herb taste strange to you? lol

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dressed_herring

    This took me quite awhile to get used to, I remember. I miss it now, its nigh impossible to find in the States.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jayce
    I remember having to fake my way through not hating it during a Unity Day dinner I got invited to in St Petersburg. Probably the only time I've ever regretted my Russophilia.
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  29. Is the European media talking about the Samantha Bee thing at all?

    edit: or the tariffs?

    Read More
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  30. @Felix Keverich

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    What? You mean blini (блины)?

    Damn, you really sound like a foreigner when you're talking like that. There is nothing wrong with Russian blini. You can make them with sugar and salt if you like. And you can eat them with jam once they are ready (mixing strawberry jam with milk and flour, and then cooking sounds like a really strange idea to me).

    Tell me, what is your opinion of dill? Does this herb taste strange to you? lol

    I thought it was spelled bilyni in English, but actually I was just mistaken.

    Borsch is spelled borscht. Former is correct in Russian, but latter is correct in English. I can hardly insist on spelling Kyiv as “Kiev” and Ukraine as “the Ukraine” unless I myself scrupulously stick to established rules.

    Read More
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  31. AP says:
    @DFH
    It might be the next Malaysia in the sense of a Chinese minority supervising native grunt work, which is what the Ethiopian 'manufacturing boom' consists in. But doubtless they will get pogromed eventually, like Asian minorities usually do in Africa.


    Ethiopia has a long history of civilization
     
    The fabled Ethiopian civilisation was sub-Mesoamerican tier

    Biggest problem for Ethiopia doesn’t seem to be blackness,
     
    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.

    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.

    AFAIK that was mostly when they had a Commie government.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DFH
    I was talking about what happened last year
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  32. Jayce says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dressed_herring

    This took me quite awhile to get used to, I remember. I miss it now, its nigh impossible to find in the States.

    I remember having to fake my way through not hating it during a Unity Day dinner I got invited to in St Petersburg. Probably the only time I’ve ever regretted my Russophilia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    I could never eat that. Nor holodetz. Vodka helps with forcing oneself to eat something out of politeness.
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  33. AP says:

    journalist Buzina, a great patriot, the soul and conscience of Ukraine

    Didn’t deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gerard2
    [MORE]

    Didn’t deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko
     
    in other words.....like the insidious troll fucktard you are.....you have no idea who Buzina is ( or Babchenko for that matter) but as you are a POS you makeup this stupid nonsense.

    Buzina was a brave, level-headed journalist who calmly and rationally destroyed all argument of these nutjob ukrop bandera-nazitards you idiot.
    He also got plenty of heat in Russian media for subscribing to an idea of Ukraine as a culture and nation, that had many differences, as well as many alignments with this Russkiy mir outlook. To call him a provocateur is beyond demented....even for a fantasist cretin as you.

    This is none more obvious in not only a few interviews on Ukrainian radio stations (naturally all done in Russian, like everything in Ukropia) and print articles....but in his tv debate on Russian TV against Zhirinovsky, you dumb prick.

    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Don't know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children). Happy to be corrected if not, but that is what would make the two equivalent.

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing. However, I dislike dressed herring too, and selyodka in general.
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  34. AP says:
    @Jayce
    I remember having to fake my way through not hating it during a Unity Day dinner I got invited to in St Petersburg. Probably the only time I've ever regretted my Russophilia.

    I could never eat that. Nor holodetz. Vodka helps with forcing oneself to eat something out of politeness.

    Read More
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  35. @Anatoly Karlin
    I think its most common use is in kasha. Really basic stuff:

    https://i0.wp.com/russianrecipebook.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Buckwheat-Kasha.jpg

    PS. According to relatives, buckwheat was not entirely trivial to get in the USSR, even in Moscow. One more achievement of socialist economics.

    I think its most common use is in kasha

    From English Wikipedia:

    The largest gross consumption per capita is in Russia, with 15 kg (33 lb) per year followed by Ukraine, with 12 kg (26 lb) per year.[1]

    More proof of the bogus nature of the Ukraine. :)

    And now for the Swedish presentation.

    Served without fail at every holiday and special occasion throughout my childhood.

    My mother gave me the “secret” family recipe she inherited recently. Of course the version I came up with myself is better. My mother throws an amazing party and is the hostess with the mostess, but she never could cook.

    There’s a great similarity of cuisine between the Germanic countries and the Slavic ones (not counting the South Slavs). Probably just down to geography, though no doubt some historical factors come into play as well.

    Tired: Slavs are untermenschen
    Wired: Slavs are disciplined warriors who will bear any burden and pay any price for victory

    Inspired: Germanic-Slavic hybrids are the true master race

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Salmon on bread (your second picture, though with white bread) is typically served during intermissions in Moscow theaters. It goes well with champagne.
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  36. Enjoy the wedding. You will write about your impressions of Romania afterwards right?

    Read More
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  37. utu says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.

    The obsession with vegetable fat goes back to when sunflowers were introduced to Russia.

    Sunflowers, a unique connection to Lent and Orthodox Russia

    https://www.desertsun.com/story/life/home-garden/maureen-gilmer/2015/02/28/sunflowers-unique-connection-lent-orthodox-russia/23744987/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Sunflower oil is obviously the best for use with cold foods, for example in salads (where unrefined oil is the best tasting).

    But when it is heated above around 170 °C, it becomes carcinogenic.

    So if you are using it for cooking, it is better to buy olive oil (which has at least a slightly higher heat tolerance before becoming carcinogenic).

    To check they sold you not fake olive oil, but a real olive oil, refrigerate close to 0°C and it should become cloudy.
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  38. AP says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    I think its most common use is in kasha
     
    From English Wikipedia:

    The largest gross consumption per capita is in Russia, with 15 kg (33 lb) per year followed by Ukraine, with 12 kg (26 lb) per year.[1]
     
    More proof of the bogus nature of the Ukraine. :)

    And now for the Swedish presentation.

    https://www.recipetineats.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Salmon-Gravlax-8.jpg

    https://assets.marthastewart.com/styles/wmax-1500/d46/martha-cooking-school-preserving-gavlax-cs2009/martha-cooking-school-preserving-gavlax-cs2009_horiz.jpg?itok=UCimWt4G

    Served without fail at every holiday and special occasion throughout my childhood.

    My mother gave me the "secret" family recipe she inherited recently. Of course the version I came up with myself is better. My mother throws an amazing party and is the hostess with the mostess, but she never could cook.

    There's a great similarity of cuisine between the Germanic countries and the Slavic ones (not counting the South Slavs). Probably just down to geography, though no doubt some historical factors come into play as well.

    Tired: Slavs are untermenschen
    Wired: Slavs are disciplined warriors who will bear any burden and pay any price for victory

    Inspired: Germanic-Slavic hybrids are the true master race

    https://pmchollywoodlife.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/barron-trump-dresses-up-for-dinner-ftr.jpg?w=620

    Salmon on bread (your second picture, though with white bread) is typically served during intermissions in Moscow theaters. It goes well with champagne.

    Read More
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  39. Gerard2 says:
    @AP

    journalist Buzina, a great patriot, the soul and conscience of Ukraine
     
    Didn't deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko.

    [MORE]

    Didn’t deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko

    in other words…..like the insidious troll fucktard you are…..you have no idea who Buzina is ( or Babchenko for that matter) but as you are a POS you makeup this stupid nonsense.

    Buzina was a brave, level-headed journalist who calmly and rationally destroyed all argument of these nutjob ukrop bandera-nazitards you idiot.
    He also got plenty of heat in Russian media for subscribing to an idea of Ukraine as a culture and nation, that had many differences, as well as many alignments with this Russkiy mir outlook. To call him a provocateur is beyond demented….even for a fantasist cretin as you.

    This is none more obvious in not only a few interviews on Ukrainian radio stations (naturally all done in Russian, like everything in Ukropia) and print articles….but in his tv debate on Russian TV against Zhirinovsky, you dumb prick.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    What brave not journo Babchenko likely shies away from:

    https://forward.com/opinion/401518/violent-anti-semitism-is-gripping-ukraine-and-the-government-is-standing/
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  40. @AP

    journalist Buzina, a great patriot, the soul and conscience of Ukraine
     
    Didn't deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko.

    Don’t know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children). Happy to be corrected if not, but that is what would make the two equivalent.

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing. However, I dislike dressed herring too, and selyodka in general.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Don’t know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children).
     
    Doesn't seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when Ukraine had gotten its territory taken by Russia and when Russian volunteers and weapons were killing Ukrainians. Unlike Babchenko, Buzina didn't flee, so he was either braver or more foolish. He worked for a Donbas oligarch's newspaper so may have thought he was protected.

    Were Babchenko's articles full of lies?

    In openly celebrating the deaths of soldiers, Babchenko was more nasty towards his own country and people, but the two had in common the fact that they were both trolling their own people and country's government and taking the side of the enemy during a time of conflict.

    Here's a pro-Ukrainian take on the Babchenko case:

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2018/05/31/in-ukraine-a-russian-journalists-staged-murder-casts-attention-on-a-forgotten-war/

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing
     
    That's true. Of course thinking this way about jello makes it less appetizing.
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  41. Dmitry says:
    @utu

    The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.
     
    The obsession with vegetable fat goes back to when sunflowers were introduced to Russia.

    Sunflowers, a unique connection to Lent and Orthodox Russia
    https://www.desertsun.com/story/life/home-garden/maureen-gilmer/2015/02/28/sunflowers-unique-connection-lent-orthodox-russia/23744987/
     

    Sunflower oil is obviously the best for use with cold foods, for example in salads (where unrefined oil is the best tasting).

    But when it is heated above around 170 °C, it becomes carcinogenic.

    So if you are using it for cooking, it is better to buy olive oil (which has at least a slightly higher heat tolerance before becoming carcinogenic).

    To check they sold you not fake olive oil, but a real olive oil, refrigerate close to 0°C and it should become cloudy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dd-nRusV4AEhUdE.jpg

    Sunflower oil should be prohibited by law for human consumption.

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

    , @utu
    I just wanted to give a historical and cultural perspective on sunflowers in Russia particularly that most Russians probably think a sunflower is a native plant. Sunflower halvah was invented in Russia, I guess. Here is Sophia Loren in Russian sunflowers:

    Los Girasoles de Rusia
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXVTGg0jCjE

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil. However different internet sources give different values going all over. Health and nutrition sites are not reliable as often they are run by health obsessive flakes and wackos two are not well grounded in scientific reality. Not sure how trustworthy is this one:

    https://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthiest-cooking-oil-chart-smoke-points
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  42. @Dmitry
    Sunflower oil is obviously the best for use with cold foods, for example in salads (where unrefined oil is the best tasting).

    But when it is heated above around 170 °C, it becomes carcinogenic.

    So if you are using it for cooking, it is better to buy olive oil (which has at least a slightly higher heat tolerance before becoming carcinogenic).

    To check they sold you not fake olive oil, but a real olive oil, refrigerate close to 0°C and it should become cloudy.


    Sunflower oil should be prohibited by law for human consumption.

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    I think it's an acquired taste (addiction).

    Also one that almost all Russians over 50 suffer from. I'm surprised Dmitry is in those ranks, though, since he's reasonably young and likes the Mediterranean clime and lifestyle.
    , @Dmitry

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

     

    It depends on the bottle. If you do it with the one designed for cooking, it won't taste of anything. If you use the nonrefined and cold-pressed one, it is tasting delicious.
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  43. Nikkei had a recent and very interesting story on Japan’s immigration policies.

    Cover Story: Famous for its resistance to immigration, Japan opens its doors

    A graph:

    And a key quote:

    Yet the total number of foreign residents in Japan has grown 20% in the last three years, reaching 2.6 million in 2017, or 2% of the total population. In Tokyo, one in eight residents who came of age this year were foreigners.

    The article is worth reading in full.

    I’ve also read that South Korea has begun to take more and more migrants, from Laos, Cambodia and so on. It’ll be interesting to follow these developments. So far, China seems to be a positive outlier under Xi Jinping who really does seem to be /ourguy/ to a greatr extent than almost any world leader (banning hiphop, purging the African street peddlers from Guangzhou, tightening immigration for all but the educated elite etc etc).

    Meanwhile, Taiwan in talks to build a 50,000 capacity mosque to accommodate Indonesian & Malaysian migrants.

    Read More
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  44. OT, but interesting on European identity.

    I asked the people on /r/SampleSize to sort the countries of Europe in the given regions (Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Europe and Not Europe, for added controversy). 384 people responded. Here I present the outcome of the survey: first, how the entirety of the respondents grouped the countries into regions.


    Note that this is asking everyone, not just Europeans, in that subreddit. The European-only part comes later.

    Next, let’s look at how confident people were about sorting the countries into regions. This map doesn’t mean much by itself, so look at in relation to the previous image. The percentage denotes the ratio of people who agreed with the most commonly accepted region for the country: for instance, 98.4% of people thought that Norway is in Northern Europe, while only 42% considered Croatia to be a part of Eastern Europe.

    This is how the people of Europe grouped the European countries. Notice that the same number of Europeans believed Croatia to be located in Eastern Europe as in Southern Europe.


    The sample size is probably quite small, but it is nevertheless reasonable. I think most people would put CZ as Central Europe. Though many Poles often stress that Poland is a Central European country, I think mentally and culturally we are more Eastern. People like to LARP as Central Europeans because of status anxiety(read: it has better and more positive connotations) but the rest of Europe correctly see us primarily as Eastern. I’m fine with that, since I dislike people who are inauthenitc LARPers.

    Croatia’s identity is mixed, of course.

    There’s more here if you want to see the other charts. One final bonus pic which made me chuckle.

    Should I feel flattered or threatened? ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Must have been a lot of Turks and Arabs in that last one, to place Turkey as maybe being inside Europe.
    , @Erik Sieven
    Slovenia as Eastern European? That's strange. Maybe some people mistook it for Slovakia.
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  45. You think the problems with the PIGS were over? Just as Italy is reaching political crisis, Spain’s prime minister managed to get sacked and having his government fall by losing a no-confidence vote from the opposition.

    Spain’s PM will lose the no-confidence debate after the Nationalist Basque Party confirmed its support to the Socialist Party initiative

    This will mean that the EU funds will probably be slashed even more for the Eastern European countries, given that while Brussels whines about us being “illiberal”, we are for the most part quite stable whereas the South increasingly is not.

    Greece is a financial black hole, Italy is imploding politically and now Spain is thrown into chaos. Only Portugal seems to be doing okay politically, though it’s gross debt is quite high. I have hopes for Spain to pull through, in part because they are my favourite Southern European country and frankly always seemed to me to be the least stereotypically ‘Southern’ whenever I would visit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser

    You think the problems with the PIGS were over?
     

    I have hopes for Spain to pull through, in part because they are my favourite Southern European country and frankly always seemed to me to be the least stereotypically ‘Southern’ whenever I would visit.
     
    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1002180397139034112
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  46. songbird says:
    @Polish Perspective
    OT, but interesting on European identity.

    I asked the people on /r/SampleSize to sort the countries of Europe in the given regions (Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Europe and Not Europe, for added controversy). 384 people responded. Here I present the outcome of the survey: first, how the entirety of the respondents grouped the countries into regions.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/vvjijgT.jpg

    Note that this is asking everyone, not just Europeans, in that subreddit. The European-only part comes later.

    Next, let's look at how confident people were about sorting the countries into regions. This map doesn't mean much by itself, so look at in relation to the previous image. The percentage denotes the ratio of people who agreed with the most commonly accepted region for the country: for instance, 98.4% of people thought that Norway is in Northern Europe, while only 42% considered Croatia to be a part of Eastern Europe.
     

    https://i.imgur.com/koMhVox.jpg

    This is how the people of Europe grouped the European countries. Notice that the same number of Europeans believed Croatia to be located in Eastern Europe as in Southern Europe.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/ohBYt5P.jpg

    The sample size is probably quite small, but it is nevertheless reasonable. I think most people would put CZ as Central Europe. Though many Poles often stress that Poland is a Central European country, I think mentally and culturally we are more Eastern. People like to LARP as Central Europeans because of status anxiety(read: it has better and more positive connotations) but the rest of Europe correctly see us primarily as Eastern. I'm fine with that, since I dislike people who are inauthenitc LARPers.

    Croatia's identity is mixed, of course.

    There's more here if you want to see the other charts. One final bonus pic which made me chuckle.

    https://i.imgur.com/42BkqAo.jpg

    Should I feel flattered or threatened? ;)

    Must have been a lot of Turks and Arabs in that last one, to place Turkey as maybe being inside Europe.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polish Perspective
    Yeah, the same thought crossed my mind. Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if quite a few Nowak's tipped the scaled for us, too, though we aren't as numerous as turks in Germany are. Secondly, we weren't put in the either/or category like Turkey, which means that the results for us were much more lop-sided. Therefore quite a few of ethnic Germans at least in that sub really must see us as Central Europeans, but the reasons(benevolent or future Ostsiedlung) for this can only be speculated on :)
    , @Mitleser
    Any potential EU member is per definition European.
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  47. utu says:
    @Dmitry
    Sunflower oil is obviously the best for use with cold foods, for example in salads (where unrefined oil is the best tasting).

    But when it is heated above around 170 °C, it becomes carcinogenic.

    So if you are using it for cooking, it is better to buy olive oil (which has at least a slightly higher heat tolerance before becoming carcinogenic).

    To check they sold you not fake olive oil, but a real olive oil, refrigerate close to 0°C and it should become cloudy.

    I just wanted to give a historical and cultural perspective on sunflowers in Russia particularly that most Russians probably think a sunflower is a native plant. Sunflower halvah was invented in Russia, I guess. Here is Sophia Loren in Russian sunflowers:

    Los Girasoles de Rusia

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil. However different internet sources give different values going all over. Health and nutrition sites are not reliable as often they are run by health obsessive flakes and wackos two are not well grounded in scientific reality. Not sure how trustworthy is this one:

    https://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthiest-cooking-oil-chart-smoke-points

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil.
     
    Briefly reading around, it seems sunflower oil does less well

    E.g. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/div-classtitlethe-intake-of-fried-virgin-olive-or-sunflower-oils-differentially-induces-oxidative-stress-in-rat-liver-microsomesdiv/89B43A5B331AEA300CDDBA445B71D4EC


    Although from abstract only, cannot see if they tested nonrefined or refined oils.
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  48. @Thorfinnsson
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dd-nRusV4AEhUdE.jpg

    Sunflower oil should be prohibited by law for human consumption.

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

    I think it’s an acquired taste (addiction).

    Also one that almost all Russians over 50 suffer from. I’m surprised Dmitry is in those ranks, though, since he’s reasonably young and likes the Mediterranean clime and lifestyle.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Sunflower seeds are delicious to chew on.

    The oil is inferior to EVOO in every respect, and given its health consequences there is no reason to use it.

    The Wehrmacht however found it useful as a machinery lubricant.

    So Russians who love sunflower oil are simply aiding and abetting German panzer armies. Traitors!
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  49. On Ethiopia.

    It’s important to point out just how far behind Ethiopia really is. They are, even for third world status, extreme laggards. Growth at these rock-bottom development levels should easily surpass 8% by any but the most incompetent governments.

    Much of their recent growth has been on debt. True, their economy has grown quickly, but even at 10% per annum, you double every seven years. Debt is growing far faster than that.

    The most bizarre claim, however, is the comparison with China. China, like the rest of East Asia, managed to get rich by manufacturing-led export growth. Malaysia has also had manufacturing-led growth, so any comparison to them is equally spurious.

    That just isn’t happening in Ethopia. The press always focuses on the shining exceptions, but by and large, there is simply no serious comparison with China. Malaysia is another ridicolous comparison, which I saw a few people in this thread make, who frankly should know better.

    I’ve long stopped taking Tyler Cowen seriously, when I read his “thoughts” on how to deal with automation. His “solution” was to push an app-economy and services. But as Dani Rodrik and a number of economists pointed out, large countries have only ever been able to get truly rich by industrialisation, in part because mass manufacturing can absorb what poor developing economies have a lot of: masses of unskilled labour. He basically had no comeback to this criticism.

    Africa will not rise. It can hopefully be haphazardly be contained, but given the complete failure of their leaders to do any semblance of fertility control, they will just export their problems elsewhere and we will have to deal with it, because it would be “racist” otherwise.

    Read More
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  50. @songbird
    Must have been a lot of Turks and Arabs in that last one, to place Turkey as maybe being inside Europe.

    Yeah, the same thought crossed my mind. Frankly, I wouldn’t be surprised if quite a few Nowak’s tipped the scaled for us, too, though we aren’t as numerous as turks in Germany are. Secondly, we weren’t put in the either/or category like Turkey, which means that the results for us were much more lop-sided. Therefore quite a few of ethnic Germans at least in that sub really must see us as Central Europeans, but the reasons(benevolent or future Ostsiedlung) for this can only be speculated on :)

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Purely based on geography, I'd consider a lot of what has traditionally been called Eastern Europe to actually be Central Europe, but I think people naturally like a dichotomy more.

    For instance, I think it would make more sense to include Finland as an honorary member of Scandinavia, than to call the whole group Northern Europe, which is a term that I think makes more sense with a wider aspect: Northern vs. Southern.
    , @Matra
    Are Poles as sensitive as Czechs about being referred to as 'Eastern' rather than 'Central' Europeans? Czechs just can let it pass without correcting anyone who says it. I guess they must look down on the more Eastern Europeans and don't like being mixed in with them, otherwise why take it so personally?
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  51. Dmitry says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Dd-nRusV4AEhUdE.jpg

    Sunflower oil should be prohibited by law for human consumption.

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

    And no, it is not the best tasting for salads you philistine.

    It depends on the bottle. If you do it with the one designed for cooking, it won’t taste of anything. If you use the nonrefined and cold-pressed one, it is tasting delicious.

    Read More
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  52. Dmitry says:
    @utu
    I just wanted to give a historical and cultural perspective on sunflowers in Russia particularly that most Russians probably think a sunflower is a native plant. Sunflower halvah was invented in Russia, I guess. Here is Sophia Loren in Russian sunflowers:

    Los Girasoles de Rusia
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXVTGg0jCjE

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil. However different internet sources give different values going all over. Health and nutrition sites are not reliable as often they are run by health obsessive flakes and wackos two are not well grounded in scientific reality. Not sure how trustworthy is this one:

    https://jonbarron.org/diet-and-nutrition/healthiest-cooking-oil-chart-smoke-points

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil.

    Briefly reading around, it seems sunflower oil does less well

    E.g. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/div-classtitlethe-intake-of-fried-virgin-olive-or-sunflower-oils-differentially-induces-oxidative-stress-in-rat-liver-microsomesdiv/89B43A5B331AEA300CDDBA445B71D4EC

    Although from abstract only, cannot see if they tested nonrefined or refined oils.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    Healthy shmelthy is your problem. Everything in moderation is my approach including the unhealthy if tasty. I was just interested in the cultural aspect of fat from sunflower in Russia.

    How The Russians Saved America's Sunflower
    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2012/01/05/144695733/how-the-russians-saved-americas-sunflower

    http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/08/strange-history-of-sunflower.html
    It was not until the eighteenth century that the sunflower gained huge popularity as a cultivated plant and the person we have to thank for that is perhaps not the first who might spring to mind. Peter the Great of Russia went on one of his many trips and landed up in Holland. There, he became so enamored of the giant flower that he took seeds back to Russia where the people were no doubt nonplussed by it – at least to begin with. During Lent, the Russian Orthodox Church forbad its adherents from consuming oil. However, the oil of the sunflower was not on the prohibited list and the Russian people jumped on Peter’s bandwagon wholeheartedly. By the third decade of the nineteenth century sunflower oil was manufactured in Russia on a large and highly lucrative commercial scale.

    Russia was awash with the giant flowers, growing over two million acres a year. They identified two types, one for oil production and one for their own consumption. The government even invested money in to what we now call research projects and one scientist, VS Pustovoit was the originator of the most successful breeding venture. Even today scientific awards for the study of the sunflower are awarded in his name. So, by 1830 the time was ripe for the sunflower (as it had become in Russia) to make a triumphant return to the Americas.
     
    , @utu
    Sunflower seed vs. rape seed consumption. They are main sources of vegetable fat in Western countries.

    https://www.indexbox.io/blog/which-country-consumes-the-most-sunflower-seeds-in-the-world/
    Which Country Consumes the Most Sunflower Seeds in the World?

    In 2015, the countries with the highest consumption were Ukraine (11,570 thousand tonnes), Russia (9,318 thousand tonnes), China (2,249 thousand tonnes), together comprising 51% of total consumption. They were followed by Tanzania with a 5% of global consumption share and Turkey with a 5% share.

    Per capita sunflower seed in Ukraine was estimated at 258.12 kg/year, much higher than the global average of 7.81 kg/year. Ukraine was the leading country in terms of per capita consumption, among the main consumers of sunflower seed, followed by Russia (64.95 kg/year), Tanzania (39.07 kg/year), Turkey (26.54 kg/year) and China (1.60 kg/year).

    https://www.indexbox.io/blog/which-country-eats-the-most-rapeseed-oil-in-the-world/
    Which Country Consumes the Most Rapeseed Oil in the World?
    The highest levels of rapeseed oil per capita consumption was registered in Germany (37.89 kg/year), followed by France (26.79 kg/year), China (4.74 kg/year), the United States (4.67 kg/year) and India (2.11 kg/year), while the average per capita consumption of rapeseed oil was estimated at 4.14 kg/year in 2015.

    Olive oil consumption is highest in Greece, Spain and Italy from 20l/y -11l/y. Surprisingly in France only 1.8l/y and in the US 1.1 l/y. Order of magnitude higher consumption of olive oil in Mediterranean countries does not make them 10 time healthier than Americans.

    One more thing. Butter is good for you and lard has no cholesterol. And I also love chicken, duck and goose fat. And my grandmother used to make a desert dish using beef suet.
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  53. DFH says:
    @AP

    Well it is since they still have problems with famine that require huge amounts of foreign food aid.
     
    AFAIK that was mostly when they had a Commie government.

    I was talking about what happened last year

    Read More
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  54. utu says:
    @Dmitry

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil.
     
    Briefly reading around, it seems sunflower oil does less well

    E.g. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/div-classtitlethe-intake-of-fried-virgin-olive-or-sunflower-oils-differentially-induces-oxidative-stress-in-rat-liver-microsomesdiv/89B43A5B331AEA300CDDBA445B71D4EC


    Although from abstract only, cannot see if they tested nonrefined or refined oils.

    Healthy shmelthy is your problem. Everything in moderation is my approach including the unhealthy if tasty. I was just interested in the cultural aspect of fat from sunflower in Russia.

    How The Russians Saved America’s Sunflower

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2012/01/05/144695733/how-the-russians-saved-americas-sunflower

    http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/08/strange-history-of-sunflower.html

    It was not until the eighteenth century that the sunflower gained huge popularity as a cultivated plant and the person we have to thank for that is perhaps not the first who might spring to mind. Peter the Great of Russia went on one of his many trips and landed up in Holland. There, he became so enamored of the giant flower that he took seeds back to Russia where the people were no doubt nonplussed by it – at least to begin with. During Lent, the Russian Orthodox Church forbad its adherents from consuming oil. However, the oil of the sunflower was not on the prohibited list and the Russian people jumped on Peter’s bandwagon wholeheartedly. By the third decade of the nineteenth century sunflower oil was manufactured in Russia on a large and highly lucrative commercial scale.

    Russia was awash with the giant flowers, growing over two million acres a year. They identified two types, one for oil production and one for their own consumption. The government even invested money in to what we now call research projects and one scientist, VS Pustovoit was the originator of the most successful breeding venture. Even today scientific awards for the study of the sunflower are awarded in his name. So, by 1830 the time was ripe for the sunflower (as it had become in Russia) to make a triumphant return to the Americas.

    Read More
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  55. Mitleser says:
    @Polish Perspective
    You think the problems with the PIGS were over? Just as Italy is reaching political crisis, Spain's prime minister managed to get sacked and having his government fall by losing a no-confidence vote from the opposition.

    Spain's PM will lose the no-confidence debate after the Nationalist Basque Party confirmed its support to the Socialist Party initiative

    This will mean that the EU funds will probably be slashed even more for the Eastern European countries, given that while Brussels whines about us being "illiberal", we are for the most part quite stable whereas the South increasingly is not.

    Greece is a financial black hole, Italy is imploding politically and now Spain is thrown into chaos. Only Portugal seems to be doing okay politically, though it's gross debt is quite high. I have hopes for Spain to pull through, in part because they are my favourite Southern European country and frankly always seemed to me to be the least stereotypically 'Southern' whenever I would visit.

    You think the problems with the PIGS were over?

    I have hopes for Spain to pull through, in part because they are my favourite Southern European country and frankly always seemed to me to be the least stereotypically ‘Southern’ whenever I would visit.

    Read More
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  56. Mitleser says:
    @songbird
    Must have been a lot of Turks and Arabs in that last one, to place Turkey as maybe being inside Europe.

    Any potential EU member is per definition European.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hyperborean
    EU values are un-European.
    , @songbird
    I've seen maps that included not only Turkey but all of North Africa. I get the idea that Juncker and his pals would fully support it.
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  57. utu says:
    @Dmitry

    As far as the smoke point of different fats it depends whether they are refined or not. Refined sunflower oil may have a higher smoke point temperature than olive oil.
     
    Briefly reading around, it seems sunflower oil does less well

    E.g. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/british-journal-of-nutrition/article/div-classtitlethe-intake-of-fried-virgin-olive-or-sunflower-oils-differentially-induces-oxidative-stress-in-rat-liver-microsomesdiv/89B43A5B331AEA300CDDBA445B71D4EC


    Although from abstract only, cannot see if they tested nonrefined or refined oils.

    Sunflower seed vs. rape seed consumption. They are main sources of vegetable fat in Western countries.

    https://www.indexbox.io/blog/which-country-consumes-the-most-sunflower-seeds-in-the-world/

    Which Country Consumes the Most Sunflower Seeds in the World?

    In 2015, the countries with the highest consumption were Ukraine (11,570 thousand tonnes), Russia (9,318 thousand tonnes), China (2,249 thousand tonnes), together comprising 51% of total consumption. They were followed by Tanzania with a 5% of global consumption share and Turkey with a 5% share.

    Per capita sunflower seed in Ukraine was estimated at 258.12 kg/year, much higher than the global average of 7.81 kg/year. Ukraine was the leading country in terms of per capita consumption, among the main consumers of sunflower seed, followed by Russia (64.95 kg/year), Tanzania (39.07 kg/year), Turkey (26.54 kg/year) and China (1.60 kg/year).

    https://www.indexbox.io/blog/which-country-eats-the-most-rapeseed-oil-in-the-world/

    Which Country Consumes the Most Rapeseed Oil in the World?
    The highest levels of rapeseed oil per capita consumption was registered in Germany (37.89 kg/year), followed by France (26.79 kg/year), China (4.74 kg/year), the United States (4.67 kg/year) and India (2.11 kg/year), while the average per capita consumption of rapeseed oil was estimated at 4.14 kg/year in 2015.

    Olive oil consumption is highest in Greece, Spain and Italy from 20l/y -11l/y. Surprisingly in France only 1.8l/y and in the US 1.1 l/y. Order of magnitude higher consumption of olive oil in Mediterranean countries does not make them 10 time healthier than Americans.

    One more thing. Butter is good for you and lard has no cholesterol. And I also love chicken, duck and goose fat. And my grandmother used to make a desert dish using beef suet.

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  58. @Thorfinnsson
    There's a number of things Japan could do in the short-term, aside from the obvious (automation):

    -Abandon noncompetitive agriculture, which currently absorbs 3% of the labor force (triple the rate in the United States)

    -Sweeping deregulation of services, particularly retail, to increase abysmal productivity in the sector

    -End unproductive "education" and put most teens into the labor force

    -More with prefabricated, manufactured buildings

    -Stop demolishing 30-year old structures

    -Increase the retirement age, and use government compulsion to increase the fitness level of the elderly to keep them in the labor force

    -"Export substitution"--allow in more manufactured goods to free up manufacturing workers (probably not a good idea, but it's on the table)

    -More efforts to reduce the mortality rate

    Long term of course Japan needs to end women's rights, eliminate "dating" and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda.

    Trouble with the long term is it's just that...long. Even if the entire yellow sharia program were implemented today, you wouldn't have any new workers for a dozen years (I doubt kids under 12 are useful for much labor these days).

    “Long term of course Japan needs to end women’s rights, eliminate “dating” and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda.”
    that’s the most important point, though I would avoid natalist policies and propaganda.

    Apart from that I would simply do nothing concerning the shortage of workers. Just let the market work. Rising loans for workers would mean a incentive to stop useless academic education. Finally be ready to accept a decline in material wealth.

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    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    though foreign workers form China would be a good thing. East Asia needs some cultural diplomacy. They need to get to know each other, so military tensions can be avoided.
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  59. @Polish Perspective
    OT, but interesting on European identity.

    I asked the people on /r/SampleSize to sort the countries of Europe in the given regions (Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Central Europe and Not Europe, for added controversy). 384 people responded. Here I present the outcome of the survey: first, how the entirety of the respondents grouped the countries into regions.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/vvjijgT.jpg

    Note that this is asking everyone, not just Europeans, in that subreddit. The European-only part comes later.

    Next, let's look at how confident people were about sorting the countries into regions. This map doesn't mean much by itself, so look at in relation to the previous image. The percentage denotes the ratio of people who agreed with the most commonly accepted region for the country: for instance, 98.4% of people thought that Norway is in Northern Europe, while only 42% considered Croatia to be a part of Eastern Europe.
     

    https://i.imgur.com/koMhVox.jpg

    This is how the people of Europe grouped the European countries. Notice that the same number of Europeans believed Croatia to be located in Eastern Europe as in Southern Europe.
     
    https://i.imgur.com/ohBYt5P.jpg

    The sample size is probably quite small, but it is nevertheless reasonable. I think most people would put CZ as Central Europe. Though many Poles often stress that Poland is a Central European country, I think mentally and culturally we are more Eastern. People like to LARP as Central Europeans because of status anxiety(read: it has better and more positive connotations) but the rest of Europe correctly see us primarily as Eastern. I'm fine with that, since I dislike people who are inauthenitc LARPers.

    Croatia's identity is mixed, of course.

    There's more here if you want to see the other charts. One final bonus pic which made me chuckle.

    https://i.imgur.com/42BkqAo.jpg

    Should I feel flattered or threatened? ;)

    Slovenia as Eastern European? That’s strange. Maybe some people mistook it for Slovakia.

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  60. @Mitleser
    Any potential EU member is per definition European.

    EU values are un-European.

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    • Replies: @Pseudonymic Handle
    EU values are anti-European.
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  61. @Erik Sieven
    "Long term of course Japan needs to end women’s rights, eliminate “dating” and romantic love (Japan traditionally had arranged marriage), and adopt a suite of aggressive natalist policies and propaganda."
    that's the most important point, though I would avoid natalist policies and propaganda.

    Apart from that I would simply do nothing concerning the shortage of workers. Just let the market work. Rising loans for workers would mean a incentive to stop useless academic education. Finally be ready to accept a decline in material wealth.

    though foreign workers form China would be a good thing. East Asia needs some cultural diplomacy. They need to get to know each other, so military tensions can be avoided.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    This is Gordon Allport's completely discredited Contact Theory, one of the sociological theories used to justify the disastrous integration experiment in America.

    Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more.

    And Japan already has quite a few Chinese guest workers and students. It's not the 1980s anymore.

    I do, however, have a radical proposal involving foreigners. Japan could relegalize polygamy with foreign women, provided you already have a Japanese wife and she has borne at least four children. Naturally the foreign wives would need to be scrutinized by the intelligence services and a eugenic board.

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  62. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Gerard2
    [MORE]

    Didn’t deserve to get killed, but a dishonest troll/provocateur. I suppose he could be a Ukrainian Babchenko
     
    in other words.....like the insidious troll fucktard you are.....you have no idea who Buzina is ( or Babchenko for that matter) but as you are a POS you makeup this stupid nonsense.

    Buzina was a brave, level-headed journalist who calmly and rationally destroyed all argument of these nutjob ukrop bandera-nazitards you idiot.
    He also got plenty of heat in Russian media for subscribing to an idea of Ukraine as a culture and nation, that had many differences, as well as many alignments with this Russkiy mir outlook. To call him a provocateur is beyond demented....even for a fantasist cretin as you.

    This is none more obvious in not only a few interviews on Ukrainian radio stations (naturally all done in Russian, like everything in Ukropia) and print articles....but in his tv debate on Russian TV against Zhirinovsky, you dumb prick.

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  63. concerning costs/benefits of PGD
    The plan sounds good. I wonder how many people actually do it right now.
    Although I would add that especially for male off-spring attractivity on the partner market should also be thought of – at least until white / yellow sharia is not implemented. That makes optimization much more difficult or even practically impossible.

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  64. Randal says:

    How the resurgence of white supremacy in the US sparked a war over free speech

    The British left reports on the ongoing process of preparing the ground for a “revision” of the US First Amendment to reflect the new dominance of the liberal left, and the fact that its former adherence to freedom of speech as a non-negotiable principle is no longer convenient.

    It’s pretty easy to read through the stark, characteristic dishonesty of the left here (for instance, the usual shameless mischaracterisation of events in Charlottesville to blame the victims, refusing to even mention the context that this was a legitimate and lawful political demonstration attacked by “protesters” seeking to shut down the freedom of their opponents to express their opinions, with the protesters enabled by sympathisers in local government ensuring that proper police cover was not available to protect the marchers) to see that this is a matter of the left shifting to position itself to reflect its new position of entrenched dominance, from its former underdog posture. Far from the leftist campaign against dissent being a response to a “rise of the right”, it actually is based upon the triumph of the left. which no longer fears the powers that be abusing power to control dissent because the left are now the “powers that be”.

    Some of them are even pretty open about admitting the truth that leftist support for freedom of speech was a mere tactic and a lie:

    As one ACLU affiliate staff attorney recently told me, they were so good at this argument for free speech “that they fooled themselves, and now fully believe that it wasn’t tactical, it was moral”.

    Now freedom of speech is an existential issue for conservatives, nationalists and the right in general, and a lot of necessary realignments are under way. The ACLU will eventually have to choose between being an advocate of freedom of speech largely for the underdogs, and its other role of being an attack dog for leftist causes, which now means being an establishment enforcer against the underdogs. My assumption is that such bodies, like Liberty in the UK, will mostly go with the much more comfortable and well rewarded establishment enforcer role, and will gain hugely in resources and powers as a result, but will consequently lose a lot (ultimately all) of their energy.

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  65. @Thorfinnsson


    he Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil.
     
    Vegetable oil wasn't just a Soviet obsession. The industry was after all developed in North America, with disastrous health consequences.

    Adolf Hitler was also a vegetable oil enthusiast.

    Modernizing regimes generally favored vegetable oils on the grounds of economy.

    Food really does seem to be an area where one wants to follow Taleb's maxim of only consuming Lindy-tested commodities.


    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia – thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland – the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.
     
    According to FAOSTAT Russia is the world's #1 producer of buckwheat, and the Ukraine is #3. I assume this isn't just a post-Soviet phenomenon.

    Did the Soviets have some other use in mind for buckwheat?

    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    Besides, wheat doesn't make for bad-tasting pancakes. Crepes and Nordic pancakes (almost the same thing) are simply made with wheat flour, eggs, and milk. North American flapjacks are more or less the same thing with the addition of a leavening agent.

    I am surprised the Finns served strawberry jam instead of lingonberry jam.

    Bretons also make buckwheat pancakes called galettes.

    More formally, gallettes de sarrasin; where I lived (southern France) they were generally called called crêpes au sarrasin — “buckwheat” is sarrasin, having been brought back from the Middle East by the Crusaders.

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  66. Randal says:

    Most amusing event this week imo was the German-looking Luxembourgish Euro-apparatchik Jean-Claude Juncker smoothly pouring oil on the troubled Italian waters by suggesting that Italians should stop dissenting from the Euro-elite’s prescriptions and work harder, be less corrupt and be more serious.

    I’m sure that went down well, and that there is some truth in it is unlikely to make it less inflammatory.

    Italy’s new populist government reacts furiously to Juncker suggesting southern Italy is corrupt and lazy

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  67. New unemployment figures for the EU came out today.

    The euro currency has been an utter failure. It has completely failed in its core objectives (convergence). Instead, we’re seeing the direct opposite: divergence.

    The Southern states in particular are stuck. Italian unemployment at 11.2% has not budged one iota.

    All countries + the US, Iceland and Norway for reference. Only really Portugal among the Southern states has done a fairly good job. Not hard to understand the instability in Italy, Spain etc when you see this table. Youth Unemployment rates are even more disastrous.

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  68. @Anatoly Karlin
    Fish roe is another problem. In the USSR, due to underdevelopment/lack of freezing facilities/whatever, fish roe was canned with chemical preservatives, and blended with vegetable oil (!!) not to mention huge amounts of salt. (The Soviets were absolutely obsessed with vegetable oil. Even now, so much stuff like olives with pimento are smothered with it, making them inedible).

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    The Finnish byliny are also much better. In Russia - thin wheat and milk pancakes, which in Finland are made with sugar and strawberry jam for children; in Finland - the old Russian style byliny are made of sour dough of buckwheat flour and sour dairy.

    The Soviets did untold damage to Russian culinary culture, up to and including eliminating the old recipe books. (Nor did they even manage to replace it with anything worthwhile - in the modern marketplace, old school Soviet stolovayas are getting massively outcompeted by burger joints and sushi bars). This tradition is only now being restored.

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.

    Freezing fish roe is an absolute travesty. Only ‘American Cheese’ can be compared in sheer, mind-boggling blasphemy.

    Visit the Far East (Sakhalin/Kamchatka) and try some real fish roe.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.

    Even top end sushi places freeze sushi and roe first.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    There's nothing wrong with American cheese.

    It's a processed cheese product which is mostly cheese. The additional ingredients are just whey and enzymes.

    It's not flavorful, but that's not the point. The point is superior meltability and thus texture in cheeseburgers.

    See here: https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/07/whats-really-in-american-cheese.html
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  69. Italy’s new populist government reacts furiously to Juncker suggesting southern Italy is corrupt and lazy

    People always complain that politicians are not honest enough. Well, the reason is simple: the few times they dare to be, people don’t typically like to hear the truth.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    “We must be aware that those who observe us from afar are worried. We have seen and heard many leaders of other planets are very worried because they ask questions concerning the way in which the EU will follow. So we must insure Europeans as well as those who observe us from afar.” – Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission President.

    I don't know why anyone would take anything he says too seriously or personally.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    This is pretty funny.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    They had an initially corrupt trajectory which saw them heavily involved in organized crime, but the same was true of the Irish and the Jews. These days the mafia is just a bunch of overweight 70 year olds in track suits trying to avoid indictment talking about the movie Goodfellas.
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  70. @Polish Perspective
    Italy's new populist government reacts furiously to Juncker suggesting southern Italy is corrupt and lazy


    People always complain that politicians are not honest enough. Well, the reason is simple: the few times they dare to be, people don't typically like to hear the truth.

    “We must be aware that those who observe us from afar are worried. We have seen and heard many leaders of other planets are very worried because they ask questions concerning the way in which the EU will follow. So we must insure Europeans as well as those who observe us from afar.” – Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission President.

    I don’t know why anyone would take anything he says too seriously or personally.

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    • Replies: @German_reader
    He's an alcoholic from an insignificant country that probably shouldn't even exist and is only important as a tax haven. But if he manages to enrage the Italians even more, maybe he'll have done at least some good.
    , @Hyperborean
    I am sure the Martians will exterminate us anyway, no matter what we say.
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  71. @Daniel Chieh
    “We must be aware that those who observe us from afar are worried. We have seen and heard many leaders of other planets are very worried because they ask questions concerning the way in which the EU will follow. So we must insure Europeans as well as those who observe us from afar.” – Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission President.

    I don't know why anyone would take anything he says too seriously or personally.

    He’s an alcoholic from an insignificant country that probably shouldn’t even exist and is only important as a tax haven. But if he manages to enrage the Italians even more, maybe he’ll have done at least some good.

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  72. Anonymous[392] • Disclaimer says:
    @anonymous coward

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.
     
    Freezing fish roe is an absolute travesty. Only 'American Cheese' can be compared in sheer, mind-boggling blasphemy.

    Visit the Far East (Sakhalin/Kamchatka) and try some real fish roe.

    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.

    Even top end sushi places freeze sushi and roe first.

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    • Replies: @songbird
    I'd never eat anything raw - including fish.

    Not only the bacteria, but the worms. Some of them probably have life cycles that involve stages in mammals. Sometimes, if worms get into the wrong host, they become confused and go into places they wouldn't normally go - like the eyeball or brain.

    Sure, freezing will kill a lot of that, but it is not as psychologically satisfying as fire.
    , @anonymous coward

    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.
     
    You are mad. Frozen and thawed roe is inedible. The correct and traditional way of treating roe is with salt. (That kills parasites and also preserves it.)
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  73. songbird says:
    @Mitleser
    Any potential EU member is per definition European.

    I’ve seen maps that included not only Turkey but all of North Africa. I get the idea that Juncker and his pals would fully support it.

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  74. AP says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Don't know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children). Happy to be corrected if not, but that is what would make the two equivalent.

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing. However, I dislike dressed herring too, and selyodka in general.

    Don’t know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children).

    Doesn’t seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when Ukraine had gotten its territory taken by Russia and when Russian volunteers and weapons were killing Ukrainians. Unlike Babchenko, Buzina didn’t flee, so he was either braver or more foolish. He worked for a Donbas oligarch’s newspaper so may have thought he was protected.

    Were Babchenko’s articles full of lies?

    In openly celebrating the deaths of soldiers, Babchenko was more nasty towards his own country and people, but the two had in common the fact that they were both trolling their own people and country’s government and taking the side of the enemy during a time of conflict.

    Here’s a pro-Ukrainian take on the Babchenko case:

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2018/05/31/in-ukraine-a-russian-journalists-staged-murder-casts-attention-on-a-forgotten-war/

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing

    That’s true. Of course thinking this way about jello makes it less appetizing.

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    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    Doesn’t seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when...
     
    You just admitted that taking a "pro-Russian approach" in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn't punish Buzina's killers). So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine? This isn't a free country we're talking about, regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.

    You can point to the results of recent elections , but these are "elections", supervised by the Azov batallion. I can guarantee you that an election in Kiev overseen by the Army of Novorossia would produce markedly different results.

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  75. @Daniel Chieh
    “We must be aware that those who observe us from afar are worried. We have seen and heard many leaders of other planets are very worried because they ask questions concerning the way in which the EU will follow. So we must insure Europeans as well as those who observe us from afar.” – Jean-Claude Juncker, European Commission President.

    I don't know why anyone would take anything he says too seriously or personally.

    I am sure the Martians will exterminate us anyway, no matter what we say.

    Read More
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  76. songbird says:
    @Anonymous
    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.

    Even top end sushi places freeze sushi and roe first.

    I’d never eat anything raw – including fish.

    Not only the bacteria, but the worms. Some of them probably have life cycles that involve stages in mammals. Sometimes, if worms get into the wrong host, they become confused and go into places they wouldn’t normally go – like the eyeball or brain.

    Sure, freezing will kill a lot of that, but it is not as psychologically satisfying as fire.

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  77. @Anonymous
    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.

    Even top end sushi places freeze sushi and roe first.

    You need to freeze it to eliminate worms and parasites.

    You are mad. Frozen and thawed roe is inedible. The correct and traditional way of treating roe is with salt. (That kills parasites and also preserves it.)

    Read More
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  78. @Anatoly Karlin
    I think it's an acquired taste (addiction).

    Also one that almost all Russians over 50 suffer from. I'm surprised Dmitry is in those ranks, though, since he's reasonably young and likes the Mediterranean clime and lifestyle.

    Sunflower seeds are delicious to chew on.

    The oil is inferior to EVOO in every respect, and given its health consequences there is no reason to use it.

    The Wehrmacht however found it useful as a machinery lubricant.

    So Russians who love sunflower oil are simply aiding and abetting German panzer armies. Traitors!

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  79. @anonymous coward

    According to my Finnish friend, roe in Finland is only slightly salted, preserved through simple freezing, and tastes fresh upon defrosting.
     
    Freezing fish roe is an absolute travesty. Only 'American Cheese' can be compared in sheer, mind-boggling blasphemy.

    Visit the Far East (Sakhalin/Kamchatka) and try some real fish roe.

    There’s nothing wrong with American cheese.

    It’s a processed cheese product which is mostly cheese. The additional ingredients are just whey and enzymes.

    It’s not flavorful, but that’s not the point. The point is superior meltability and thus texture in cheeseburgers.

    See here: https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/07/whats-really-in-american-cheese.html

    Read More
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  80. @Polish Perspective
    Italy's new populist government reacts furiously to Juncker suggesting southern Italy is corrupt and lazy


    People always complain that politicians are not honest enough. Well, the reason is simple: the few times they dare to be, people don't typically like to hear the truth.

    This is pretty funny.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    They had an initially corrupt trajectory which saw them heavily involved in organized crime, but the same was true of the Irish and the Jews. These days the mafia is just a bunch of overweight 70 year olds in track suits trying to avoid indictment talking about the movie Goodfellas.

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    • Replies: @Mitleser

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.
     
    Think of North Italians and South Italians as North Europeans and South Europeans in one nation state which was primarily created and run by the former.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.
     
    Not in the 19th century. Otherwise, it would not have fallen so easily.
    , @DFH

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.
     
    It was notoriously backward since at least the 18th century. Maybe it was relatively advanced in the 13th century.
    , @Anonymous

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.
     
    Other than Scalia and outside of the arts, there doesn't appear to be a single Sicilian in America who has a big intellectual achievement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Sicilian_Americans

    Considering Italian Americans are overall 5% of the US population and their lack of contributions in proportion to numbers, the Mezzogiorno migration has been a net drain for America.
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  81. songbird says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Yeah, the same thought crossed my mind. Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if quite a few Nowak's tipped the scaled for us, too, though we aren't as numerous as turks in Germany are. Secondly, we weren't put in the either/or category like Turkey, which means that the results for us were much more lop-sided. Therefore quite a few of ethnic Germans at least in that sub really must see us as Central Europeans, but the reasons(benevolent or future Ostsiedlung) for this can only be speculated on :)

    Purely based on geography, I’d consider a lot of what has traditionally been called Eastern Europe to actually be Central Europe, but I think people naturally like a dichotomy more.

    For instance, I think it would make more sense to include Finland as an honorary member of Scandinavia, than to call the whole group Northern Europe, which is a term that I think makes more sense with a wider aspect: Northern vs. Southern.

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  82. Yevardian says:

    Looks like Japan is going to start mass labor importation. Under the nationalist Abe no less.

    F

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  83. Mitleser says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    This is pretty funny.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    They had an initially corrupt trajectory which saw them heavily involved in organized crime, but the same was true of the Irish and the Jews. These days the mafia is just a bunch of overweight 70 year olds in track suits trying to avoid indictment talking about the movie Goodfellas.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Think of North Italians and South Italians as North Europeans and South Europeans in one nation state which was primarily created and run by the former.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Not in the 19th century. Otherwise, it would not have fallen so easily.

    Read More
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  84. DFH says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    This is pretty funny.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    They had an initially corrupt trajectory which saw them heavily involved in organized crime, but the same was true of the Irish and the Jews. These days the mafia is just a bunch of overweight 70 year olds in track suits trying to avoid indictment talking about the movie Goodfellas.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    It was notoriously backward since at least the 18th century. Maybe it was relatively advanced in the 13th century.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    I believe they used to call anyone who could read professore. Differences in height were quite remarked upon, but they are at least partly genetic.
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  85. songbird says:
    @DFH

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.
     
    It was notoriously backward since at least the 18th century. Maybe it was relatively advanced in the 13th century.

    I believe they used to call anyone who could read professore. Differences in height were quite remarked upon, but they are at least partly genetic.

    Read More
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  86. However, that solution would be hard to accept, as it predicts a future for our own civilization that is even worse than extinction.

    If I understand it correctly, the article proposes that we are the first and, provided we start colonizing the Galaxy, will exterminate all the others. Why is it worse than extinction? Nothing is worse than extinction.

    Though it’s possible it won’t be us but our AIs who will colonize the Galaxy. Which would be extinction for all practical purposes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    I honestly think it would be pretty disturbing if aliens showed up. It is not about my fear of them directly, but rather what it would mean for our psychology. I've encountered many blacks that I would consider to have been driven insane by living in the constant shadow of whites, so much so, that I've come to think re-segregation would be a compassion, provided the worlds did not intersect and were completely isolated.
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  87. @AP

    Don’t know if Buzina ever expressed joy over the deaths of Ukrainian soldiers (let alone people loosely affiliated to them, or Ukrainian children).
     
    Doesn't seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when Ukraine had gotten its territory taken by Russia and when Russian volunteers and weapons were killing Ukrainians. Unlike Babchenko, Buzina didn't flee, so he was either braver or more foolish. He worked for a Donbas oligarch's newspaper so may have thought he was protected.

    Were Babchenko's articles full of lies?

    In openly celebrating the deaths of soldiers, Babchenko was more nasty towards his own country and people, but the two had in common the fact that they were both trolling their own people and country's government and taking the side of the enemy during a time of conflict.

    Here's a pro-Ukrainian take on the Babchenko case:

    https://www.dailysignal.com/2018/05/31/in-ukraine-a-russian-journalists-staged-murder-casts-attention-on-a-forgotten-war/

    Kholodets is essentially just a very thick bone broth that has gone cool. Thinkinv of it that way makes it far more appetizing
     
    That's true. Of course thinking this way about jello makes it less appetizing.

    Doesn’t seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when…

    You just admitted that taking a “pro-Russian approach” in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn’t punish Buzina’s killers). So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine? This isn’t a free country we’re talking about, regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.

    You can point to the results of recent elections , but these are “elections”, supervised by the Azov batallion. I can guarantee you that an election in Kiev overseen by the Army of Novorossia would produce markedly different results.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    You just admitted that taking a “pro-Russian approach” in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn’t punish Buzina’s killers
     
    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war. He was a provocateur. Such people shouldn't be killed and turned into martyrs of course.

    Comparing his situation to that of someone "taking a Russian approach" in the voting booth or when answering a poll is absurd.


    So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine?
     
    Demographics, polls and voting. Even if nothing else changes, removing Crimea and Donbas alone results in a solid pro-Western majority. Add the war, and the advantage grows.

    This isn’t a free country we’re talking about.. regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.
     
    After 9-11 some people wearing turbans were shot in America.

    Apparently, according to your logic, there was a lot of pro-Muslim sentiment in America after 9-11 but people were afraid to express it because it isn't a free country and someone could get killed.

    Russian skinheads sometimes kill Tajiks in Russia. Apparently according to your logic there is strong support for Islam in Russia but people are afraid to express it. Nemtsov's killing proves that elections don't mean anything the Russia - the liberal majority is silenced.

    In the world of Felix Keverich, whenever someone is killed who holds unpopular or offensive views, it really means those views are popular, but suppressed.


    but these are “elections”, supervised by the Azov batallion.
     
    You are not ashamed to mention Azov battalion after you were caught stupidly claiming they were western Ukrainians, revealing your ignorance.
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  88. songbird says:
    @reiner Tor

    However, that solution would be hard to accept, as it predicts a future for our own civilization that is even worse than extinction.
     
    If I understand it correctly, the article proposes that we are the first and, provided we start colonizing the Galaxy, will exterminate all the others. Why is it worse than extinction? Nothing is worse than extinction.

    Though it's possible it won't be us but our AIs who will colonize the Galaxy. Which would be extinction for all practical purposes.

    I honestly think it would be pretty disturbing if aliens showed up. It is not about my fear of them directly, but rather what it would mean for our psychology. I’ve encountered many blacks that I would consider to have been driven insane by living in the constant shadow of whites, so much so, that I’ve come to think re-segregation would be a compassion, provided the worlds did not intersect and were completely isolated.

    Read More
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  89. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich

    Doesn’t seem to be the case. He just lied repeatedly, and took a pro-Russian approach in Kiev at a time when...
     
    You just admitted that taking a "pro-Russian approach" in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn't punish Buzina's killers). So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine? This isn't a free country we're talking about, regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.

    You can point to the results of recent elections , but these are "elections", supervised by the Azov batallion. I can guarantee you that an election in Kiev overseen by the Army of Novorossia would produce markedly different results.

    You just admitted that taking a “pro-Russian approach” in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn’t punish Buzina’s killers

    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war. He was a provocateur. Such people shouldn’t be killed and turned into martyrs of course.

    Comparing his situation to that of someone “taking a Russian approach” in the voting booth or when answering a poll is absurd.

    So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine?

    Demographics, polls and voting. Even if nothing else changes, removing Crimea and Donbas alone results in a solid pro-Western majority. Add the war, and the advantage grows.

    This isn’t a free country we’re talking about.. regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.

    After 9-11 some people wearing turbans were shot in America.

    Apparently, according to your logic, there was a lot of pro-Muslim sentiment in America after 9-11 but people were afraid to express it because it isn’t a free country and someone could get killed.

    Russian skinheads sometimes kill Tajiks in Russia. Apparently according to your logic there is strong support for Islam in Russia but people are afraid to express it. Nemtsov’s killing proves that elections don’t mean anything the Russia – the liberal majority is silenced.

    In the world of Felix Keverich, whenever someone is killed who holds unpopular or offensive views, it really means those views are popular, but suppressed.

    but these are “elections”, supervised by the Azov batallion.

    You are not ashamed to mention Azov battalion after you were caught stupidly claiming they were western Ukrainians, revealing your ignorance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war.
     
    Ukrainian "patriots" deserve to be ridiculed. Just look what at the stunt they pulled with Babchenko. They actually think it was some brilliant operation they executed. Describing Ukrainian regime as fascist would be giving it too much credit. They are, in the words of Mikhail Saakashvili, допотопныe бандерлоги.

    Poll after poll shows, that бандерлоги running the Ukraine at this time are extremely unpopular. In this situation, it is natural for people to search for the alternatives. This is why the regime takes care to shut down disseting opinions - they recognise their vulnerability.
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  90. I just tried and failed to purchase a side of salmon at Kroger.

    I went to the self checkout, and to my dismay there was an item rung up in the till. Required an employee intervention to void.

    The salmon was not bar coded and thus could not be scanned.

    I looked over at the regular checkouts, and there were deep lines of geriatrics buying 800 tons of cake mix so they could bake dry, tasteless desserts for their fat proletarian prediabetic grandchildren.

    I just dropped the salmon and walked out.

    Never going shopping ever again.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    deep lines of geriatrics buying 800 tons of cake mix so they could bake dry, tasteless desserts for their fat proletarian prediabetic grandchildren.
     
    Due to the superior Scandinavian genes of the inhabitants of backwoods Wisconsin to what extent is underclass decay limited compared to other rural regions (e.g. Ohio and West Virginia) with a poorer stock of human capital?
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  91. @AP

    You just admitted that taking a “pro-Russian approach” in Kiev at this time will get you killed (with full complicity of the regime, that didn’t punish Buzina’s killers
     
    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war. He was a provocateur. Such people shouldn't be killed and turned into martyrs of course.

    Comparing his situation to that of someone "taking a Russian approach" in the voting booth or when answering a poll is absurd.


    So how can you argue that pro-Russian approaches are unpopular in the Ukraine?
     
    Demographics, polls and voting. Even if nothing else changes, removing Crimea and Donbas alone results in a solid pro-Western majority. Add the war, and the advantage grows.

    This isn’t a free country we’re talking about.. regime has effectively outlawed pro-Russian views under threat of death.
     
    After 9-11 some people wearing turbans were shot in America.

    Apparently, according to your logic, there was a lot of pro-Muslim sentiment in America after 9-11 but people were afraid to express it because it isn't a free country and someone could get killed.

    Russian skinheads sometimes kill Tajiks in Russia. Apparently according to your logic there is strong support for Islam in Russia but people are afraid to express it. Nemtsov's killing proves that elections don't mean anything the Russia - the liberal majority is silenced.

    In the world of Felix Keverich, whenever someone is killed who holds unpopular or offensive views, it really means those views are popular, but suppressed.


    but these are “elections”, supervised by the Azov batallion.
     
    You are not ashamed to mention Azov battalion after you were caught stupidly claiming they were western Ukrainians, revealing your ignorance.

    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war.

    Ukrainian “patriots” deserve to be ridiculed. Just look what at the stunt they pulled with Babchenko. They actually think it was some brilliant operation they executed. Describing Ukrainian regime as fascist would be giving it too much credit. They are, in the words of Mikhail Saakashvili, допотопныe бандерлоги.

    Poll after poll shows, that бандерлоги running the Ukraine at this time are extremely unpopular. In this situation, it is natural for people to search for the alternatives. This is why the regime takes care to shut down disseting opinions – they recognise their vulnerability.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    A good deal of whataboutism that you received. As one svido extraordinaire put it:

    http://russiafeed.com/crazy-ukrainian-leader-says-half-of-ukraine-is-mentally-retarded/

    It's probably easier to be a pro-Bandera svido in Moscow than a reasoned and openly pro-Russian advocate in Kiev.

    Recall the not too distantly deceased (not murdered) Ekho Moskvy host with a surname starting with the letter N, who praised Bandera. That station had on at least another svido leaning advocate whose name escapes me.

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  92. Matra says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Yeah, the same thought crossed my mind. Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if quite a few Nowak's tipped the scaled for us, too, though we aren't as numerous as turks in Germany are. Secondly, we weren't put in the either/or category like Turkey, which means that the results for us were much more lop-sided. Therefore quite a few of ethnic Germans at least in that sub really must see us as Central Europeans, but the reasons(benevolent or future Ostsiedlung) for this can only be speculated on :)

    Are Poles as sensitive as Czechs about being referred to as ‘Eastern’ rather than ‘Central’ Europeans? Czechs just can let it pass without correcting anyone who says it. I guess they must look down on the more Eastern Europeans and don’t like being mixed in with them, otherwise why take it so personally?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Hungarians are.
    , @Polish Perspective
    Not as much as the Czechs, who are hypersensitive about it, but I am certainly annoyed by the rather large amount of Poles who indeed are.

    Poland is fundamentally not a Western country. The arguments I've heard in favor of it ("we used the latin alphabet while the East used cyrillic!") or ("we were the last bastion of Latin Christendom against the barbarous Eastern Orthodox!") are all unconvincing. Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there's always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly "sarmatians" and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we're supposedly these 'Central Europeans'. It's all rather bullshit to me.

    I pin it down to status anxiety, and not much else. It's a sad reflection on how insecure many Poles feel about their own culture and history, as well as many other Eastern European peoples, because deep down they know we belong to the Eastern sphere in a very decisive way and we're just larping as Westerners.

    This is amplified with the significant amount of Russophobia in Poland. We have far more in common culturally and socially with Russians than we do with the French, despite being supposed 'enemies' with Russia. We are not Westerners and this 'we wuz Central Europeans' is an attempt at that.

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  93. Anonymous[668] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I just tried and failed to purchase a side of salmon at Kroger.

    I went to the self checkout, and to my dismay there was an item rung up in the till. Required an employee intervention to void.

    The salmon was not bar coded and thus could not be scanned.

    I looked over at the regular checkouts, and there were deep lines of geriatrics buying 800 tons of cake mix so they could bake dry, tasteless desserts for their fat proletarian prediabetic grandchildren.

    I just dropped the salmon and walked out.

    Never going shopping ever again.

    deep lines of geriatrics buying 800 tons of cake mix so they could bake dry, tasteless desserts for their fat proletarian prediabetic grandchildren.

    Due to the superior Scandinavian genes of the inhabitants of backwoods Wisconsin to what extent is underclass decay limited compared to other rural regions (e.g. Ohio and West Virginia) with a poorer stock of human capital?

    Read More
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  94. @Matra
    Are Poles as sensitive as Czechs about being referred to as 'Eastern' rather than 'Central' Europeans? Czechs just can let it pass without correcting anyone who says it. I guess they must look down on the more Eastern Europeans and don't like being mixed in with them, otherwise why take it so personally?

    Hungarians are.

    Read More
    • Replies: @for-the-record
    As my Lithuanian friends are wont to remind me, the geographic center of Europe is in
    Purnuškės, Lithuania

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Lithuania_Centre_of_Europe.jpg

    which I guess means that Hungary must be in southern Europe, or perhaps south-central Europe.
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  95. @Erik Sieven
    though foreign workers form China would be a good thing. East Asia needs some cultural diplomacy. They need to get to know each other, so military tensions can be avoided.

    This is Gordon Allport’s completely discredited Contact Theory, one of the sociological theories used to justify the disastrous integration experiment in America.

    Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more.

    And Japan already has quite a few Chinese guest workers and students. It’s not the 1980s anymore.

    I do, however, have a radical proposal involving foreigners. Japan could relegalize polygamy with foreign women, provided you already have a Japanese wife and she has borne at least four children. Naturally the foreign wives would need to be scrutinized by the intelligence services and a eugenic board.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    "Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more."
    I don't think this would be a problem in Japan with Chinese workers. Japanese would simply learn that Chinese are pretty similar to themselves, with all the strengths an weaknesses. Of course poorer, with a higher tendency to cheat, but in this regard Chinese will converge to Japanese in the the next decades anyway. Thats something different than for Euro-Americans getting to know African-Americans better and learning that behavioral differences are bigger than expected.
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  96. @Thorfinnsson
    This is Gordon Allport's completely discredited Contact Theory, one of the sociological theories used to justify the disastrous integration experiment in America.

    Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more.

    And Japan already has quite a few Chinese guest workers and students. It's not the 1980s anymore.

    I do, however, have a radical proposal involving foreigners. Japan could relegalize polygamy with foreign women, provided you already have a Japanese wife and she has borne at least four children. Naturally the foreign wives would need to be scrutinized by the intelligence services and a eugenic board.

    “Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more.”
    I don’t think this would be a problem in Japan with Chinese workers. Japanese would simply learn that Chinese are pretty similar to themselves, with all the strengths an weaknesses. Of course poorer, with a higher tendency to cheat, but in this regard Chinese will converge to Japanese in the the next decades anyway. Thats something different than for Euro-Americans getting to know African-Americans better and learning that behavioral differences are bigger than expected.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Ever hear of the narcissism of small differences?

    Below is a video of Japanese nationalists attacking a Korean school:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8C1NbntRWDI

    And then of course on mainland China you have anti-Japanese riots.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_China_anti-Japanese_demonstrations

    And my personal favorite, Honda China workers going on strike and attempting to physically attack a Japanese executive who made some unfortunate remarks about the Second Sino-Japanese War: http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-workers-strike-after-japanese-execs-controversial-comments-1618010

    You can find this sort of thing with whites as well.

    Americans think Canadians are gay.

    Russians think Ukrainians are neo-nazi Banderists.

    Swedes think Danes are extremely tricky and dishonest.

    The English believe that "wogs begin at Calais" and everyone on the Continent is a fool.

    The French think that the Germans are violent barbarians.

    http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Culture/foreigners.html
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  97. Not Raul says:
    @German_reader
    I don't know, if there's a war against Iran (which seems like a real possibility), the Jewish angle will be hard to cover up, given how Sheldon Adelson, Paul Singer etc. have literally bought influence with Trump and other politicians. And since such a war will probably end in a catastrophe, I could even imagine the US becoming seriously antisemitic as a reaction.

    I dunno. There wasn’t such a reaction to the Iraq War.

    Read More
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  98. Anonymous[128] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    This is pretty funny.

    I wonder what exactly the deal is with the Mezzogiorno.

    Two Sicilies was reportedly relatively advanced prior to unification.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    They had an initially corrupt trajectory which saw them heavily involved in organized crime, but the same was true of the Irish and the Jews. These days the mafia is just a bunch of overweight 70 year olds in track suits trying to avoid indictment talking about the movie Goodfellas.

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.

    Other than Scalia and outside of the arts, there doesn’t appear to be a single Sicilian in America who has a big intellectual achievement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Sicilian_Americans

    Considering Italian Americans are overall 5% of the US population and their lack of contributions in proportion to numbers, the Mezzogiorno migration has been a net drain for America.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Why not just look at a list of all Italian-Americans, instead of strictly Sicily? There are exceptions, but most Italian-Americans came from the Mezzogiorno.

    Lee Iacocca, one of the greatest automotive executives in American history, has his origins in Campania.

    The legendary investor Ray Dalio is of Italian descent, though I'm unable to find his origins in Italy as searching for it keeps turning up stuff about his Italian bets.

    The real harm Italians inflicted on America is contributing to the decline of the Northern European phenotype.
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  99. @Erik Sieven
    "Often getting to know foreigners just makes you hate them more."
    I don't think this would be a problem in Japan with Chinese workers. Japanese would simply learn that Chinese are pretty similar to themselves, with all the strengths an weaknesses. Of course poorer, with a higher tendency to cheat, but in this regard Chinese will converge to Japanese in the the next decades anyway. Thats something different than for Euro-Americans getting to know African-Americans better and learning that behavioral differences are bigger than expected.

    Ever hear of the narcissism of small differences?

    Below is a video of Japanese nationalists attacking a Korean school:

    And then of course on mainland China you have anti-Japanese riots.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2012_China_anti-Japanese_demonstrations

    And my personal favorite, Honda China workers going on strike and attempting to physically attack a Japanese executive who made some unfortunate remarks about the Second Sino-Japanese War: http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-workers-strike-after-japanese-execs-controversial-comments-1618010

    You can find this sort of thing with whites as well.

    Americans think Canadians are gay.

    Russians think Ukrainians are neo-nazi Banderists.

    Swedes think Danes are extremely tricky and dishonest.

    The English believe that “wogs begin at Calais” and everyone on the Continent is a fool.

    The French think that the Germans are violent barbarians.

    http://www.johnderbyshire.com/Opinions/Culture/foreigners.html

    Read More
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  100. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Felix Keverich

    He was a public figure who not only took a pro-Russian approach but publicly mocked and ridiculed Ukrainian patriots at a time of war.
     
    Ukrainian "patriots" deserve to be ridiculed. Just look what at the stunt they pulled with Babchenko. They actually think it was some brilliant operation they executed. Describing Ukrainian regime as fascist would be giving it too much credit. They are, in the words of Mikhail Saakashvili, допотопныe бандерлоги.

    Poll after poll shows, that бандерлоги running the Ukraine at this time are extremely unpopular. In this situation, it is natural for people to search for the alternatives. This is why the regime takes care to shut down disseting opinions - they recognise their vulnerability.

    A good deal of whataboutism that you received. As one svido extraordinaire put it:

    http://russiafeed.com/crazy-ukrainian-leader-says-half-of-ukraine-is-mentally-retarded/

    It’s probably easier to be a pro-Bandera svido in Moscow than a reasoned and openly pro-Russian advocate in Kiev.

    Recall the not too distantly deceased (not murdered) Ekho Moskvy host with a surname starting with the letter N, who praised Bandera. That station had on at least another svido leaning advocate whose name escapes me.

    Read More
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  101. @Anonymous

    Most Italian-Americans hail from Sicily and Calabria, and they do not differ from other American whites in achievement.
     
    Other than Scalia and outside of the arts, there doesn't appear to be a single Sicilian in America who has a big intellectual achievement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Sicilian_Americans

    Considering Italian Americans are overall 5% of the US population and their lack of contributions in proportion to numbers, the Mezzogiorno migration has been a net drain for America.

    Why not just look at a list of all Italian-Americans, instead of strictly Sicily? There are exceptions, but most Italian-Americans came from the Mezzogiorno.

    Lee Iacocca, one of the greatest automotive executives in American history, has his origins in Campania.

    The legendary investor Ray Dalio is of Italian descent, though I’m unable to find his origins in Italy as searching for it keeps turning up stuff about his Italian bets.

    The real harm Italians inflicted on America is contributing to the decline of the Northern European phenotype.

    Read More
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  102. Mikhail says: • Website

    From JRL promoted McFaul:

    http://russialist.org/jrl-newswatch-assassins-were-trying-kill-babchenko-he-has-every-right-to-do-anything-to-survive-as-someone-who-also-has-had-death-threats-lodged-against-me-i-find-lectures-about-how-hunted-pe/

    To be expected from someone who lauds Julia Ioffe. So much for Mr. Meduza (Kevin Rothrock) describing McFaul as a Russophile.

    Like McFaul has proof that there was a murder attempt on Babchenko as described by the Kiev regime. On the other hand, there’s considerable proof that the Kiev regime has launched negative lies about Russia.

    Read More
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  103. @reiner Tor
    Hungarians are.

    As my Lithuanian friends are wont to remind me, the geographic center of Europe is in
    Purnuškės, Lithuania

    which I guess means that Hungary must be in southern Europe, or perhaps south-central Europe.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Hungary claims the same:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographical_midpoint_of_Europe?wprov=sfti1

    It depends how you calculate or weight places like Iceland or Svalbard.
    , @Mitleser
    Lithuania? Never! Germany is center.

    GADHEIM, POPULATION 89, IS A quiet village surrounded by farms in central Germany’s wine country. It may be just a small dot on the map, but Gadheim is about to be a symbolically important dot. When Brexit is finalized in 2019, the town will be the new geographic center of the European Union.

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler. An EU flag will soon fly there to mark the spot, but Kessler has mixed feelings about the designation. “The fact that it’s only happening because of this Brexit is a bit of a shame for me,” she told German news site The Local.

    The geographic center of the EU shifts each time a country joins or leaves. The current center is in Westerngrund, about 37 miles northwest of Gadheim, but it has only held the title since 2013, when Croatia joined the coalition. Before that, the inclusion of Bulgaria and Romania put the center in Meerholz, Germany. If Scotland votes to withdraw from the United Kingdom and independently rejoin the EU, the geographic center will move (slightly) once again, back toward Westerngrund.
     
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/geographic-center-european-union-brexit
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  104. @Hyperborean
    EU values are un-European.

    EU values are anti-European.

    Read More
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  105. @Matra
    Are Poles as sensitive as Czechs about being referred to as 'Eastern' rather than 'Central' Europeans? Czechs just can let it pass without correcting anyone who says it. I guess they must look down on the more Eastern Europeans and don't like being mixed in with them, otherwise why take it so personally?

    Not as much as the Czechs, who are hypersensitive about it, but I am certainly annoyed by the rather large amount of Poles who indeed are.

    Poland is fundamentally not a Western country. The arguments I’ve heard in favor of it (“we used the latin alphabet while the East used cyrillic!”) or (“we were the last bastion of Latin Christendom against the barbarous Eastern Orthodox!”) are all unconvincing. Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there’s always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly “sarmatians” and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we’re supposedly these ‘Central Europeans’. It’s all rather bullshit to me.

    I pin it down to status anxiety, and not much else. It’s a sad reflection on how insecure many Poles feel about their own culture and history, as well as many other Eastern European peoples, because deep down they know we belong to the Eastern sphere in a very decisive way and we’re just larping as Westerners.

    This is amplified with the significant amount of Russophobia in Poland. We have far more in common culturally and socially with Russians than we do with the French, despite being supposed ‘enemies’ with Russia. We are not Westerners and this ‘we wuz Central Europeans’ is an attempt at that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    If Poland is to be Eastern European who is left to be Central European? Austrians and Czechs only? Do we need this Central European term for just two inky dinky countries? Then we could say we have Eastern and Western Europe plus Austria and Czechia which also happen to be in Europe.

    I looked up about Czechs and how they feel about it. Indeed they seem to be touchy. More so than I would fit my concept of Czechs.

    Anyway, it is all a pointless nonsense.
    , @Mitleser

    Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there’s always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly “sarmatians” and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we’re supposedly these ‘Central Europeans’. It’s all rather bullshit to me.
     

    https://i.imgur.com/LYsBIyI.png

    Barbarian man of Poland [Boluniya] in the Great Western Ocean, and his barbarian wife + random bear
     

    This country is east of Germany. Because the area is frigid, its inhabitants all wear coats of fox pelt even into early summer. The Poles like sword-fighting, and they also train bears in their houses and make them perform tricks. The women are in charge of all household affairs. Their laws are harsh both within and abroad. This country produces amber.
     
    https://www.reddit.com/r/China/comments/7wrgvs/18thcentury_chinese_drawing_of_a_swiss_mercenary/du2mb2c/

    Bear Poland could be described as Eastern, but Poland was moved westwards in the last century, hence Central Europeans is the correct term for the new Poles.

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  106. Hey, Anatoly, when you are in Bucharest we should meet.

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  107. utu says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Not as much as the Czechs, who are hypersensitive about it, but I am certainly annoyed by the rather large amount of Poles who indeed are.

    Poland is fundamentally not a Western country. The arguments I've heard in favor of it ("we used the latin alphabet while the East used cyrillic!") or ("we were the last bastion of Latin Christendom against the barbarous Eastern Orthodox!") are all unconvincing. Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there's always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly "sarmatians" and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we're supposedly these 'Central Europeans'. It's all rather bullshit to me.

    I pin it down to status anxiety, and not much else. It's a sad reflection on how insecure many Poles feel about their own culture and history, as well as many other Eastern European peoples, because deep down they know we belong to the Eastern sphere in a very decisive way and we're just larping as Westerners.

    This is amplified with the significant amount of Russophobia in Poland. We have far more in common culturally and socially with Russians than we do with the French, despite being supposed 'enemies' with Russia. We are not Westerners and this 'we wuz Central Europeans' is an attempt at that.

    If Poland is to be Eastern European who is left to be Central European? Austrians and Czechs only? Do we need this Central European term for just two inky dinky countries? Then we could say we have Eastern and Western Europe plus Austria and Czechia which also happen to be in Europe.

    I looked up about Czechs and how they feel about it. Indeed they seem to be touchy. More so than I would fit my concept of Czechs.

    Anyway, it is all a pointless nonsense.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ERM
    The Czechs are capable of being self-aware about this particular hang-up. There is a famous Czech comedy set in 1946, where the father of the main character gives a patriotic speech that includes the line. "We're Slavs! But Western Slavs!"

    For me, the concept of Central Europe is inseparable from the legacy of the former Habsburg realm. There's a certain architectural, culinary, bureaucratic, and general cultural overlay in those areas that you notice the presence or absence of when passing in or out of the region. Even a dimwit wouldn't take too long to start suspecting that Budapest and Prague used to be in the same country, or that Vienna was too but Berlin wasn't.
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  108. I’m writing a screenplay about Noah’s flood, except the movie is from the perspective of a family that isn’t on the Ark.

    Assuming that the film is well written (which it will be since I’m the one writing it) is that a movie that any of you would be interested in seeing?

    I have a friend who is a writer in Hollywood and he was super negative about the idea when I pitched it to him. He said no Hollywood studio would ever touch it. He added that the only market for such a film would be Evangelical Christians but that they would never allow their children to see a movie that humanized the flood’s victims so they are out as potential ticket buyers as well. He basically thought that it was a film with no audience.

    Whatever. I think that if you make a good movie with an original plot people will want to see it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    Maybe you could also include a plot about the animals that died in the flood, like dinosaurs. That could make it interesting for creationists.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Does it have Taylor Swift?
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  109. https://www.rt.com/news/428493-india-buy-s-400-systems-russia/

    India decided to proceed with the long-anticipated $5.5 bln deal to purchase Russia’s S-400 surface-to-air missile units despite the US saying the purchase may affect the relations between Washington and New Dehli.

    According to the Hindustan Times, India’s Defense Ministry is to ask the apex Cabinet Committee to approve the purchase of the five S-400 Triumf systems, thus finalizing the agreement.

    The deal is set to go through despite the fact that the Trump administration warning New Delhi of the possible ramifications of India’s intention to cultivate military ties with Russia, that would imminently jeopardise its relations with the US.

    There was a noticeable attempt to shift away from Russia – which has traditionally been India’s main arms supplier – to the US during the Modi era. Though any shift takes a long time and Russia still had the lion’s share of arms deals. He has tried very hard to align India with the US and during Obama’s presidency this came into full bloom.

    However, we have to thank Trump for souring relations, in no small part because of Washington’s hassling the Indians on H1B and related visas, as well as Trump naming India’s trade deficit as a potential problem. The Trump administration has also taken many cases against India in the WTO and has threatened to remove GSP, which are a series of trade concessions to developing countries that the US and the EU give to poor countries. None of these moves are very friendly to India.

    The Indians knew that the S-400 was superior even before Trump, but refrained from buying during the Obama era as they sought closer ties with DC. This is now in shatters, and we can thank Trump. Outside of MENA, where he continues to be a puppet of the Israeli lobby, he has actually had a quite decent foreign policy, at least from my worldview. Moving India closer to Russia is a net win. Alienating the EU is a net win, which weakens the hand of the ‘Atlanticist’ servile class that Merkel belongs to and strengthens the voices of those calling for greater distance. He calls African countries shitholes. He has tried to unify NK with SK (though with considerable help from China). All around, not a bad record.

    Read More
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  110. songbird says:

    That food map of Africa will probably change a lot by 2100.

    Read More
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  111. @Greasy William
    I'm writing a screenplay about Noah's flood, except the movie is from the perspective of a family that isn't on the Ark.

    Assuming that the film is well written (which it will be since I'm the one writing it) is that a movie that any of you would be interested in seeing?

    I have a friend who is a writer in Hollywood and he was super negative about the idea when I pitched it to him. He said no Hollywood studio would ever touch it. He added that the only market for such a film would be Evangelical Christians but that they would never allow their children to see a movie that humanized the flood's victims so they are out as potential ticket buyers as well. He basically thought that it was a film with no audience.

    Whatever. I think that if you make a good movie with an original plot people will want to see it.

    Maybe you could also include a plot about the animals that died in the flood, like dinosaurs. That could make it interesting for creationists.

    Read More
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  112. Maybe you can visit Vee when your in Romania? Of course that may just be a waist of time hahahahahah!!

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  113. Since we are all “nationalists”, I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:

    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American–I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The “immigrant nation” stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don’t blame you or Patrick’s parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can’t connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn’t know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    Did you really write that and feel like that?
    , @reiner Tor
    I started to have similar feelings around age 32, by which time I had made a number of irreversible or near irreversible decisions.

    Anyway, it’s worthless to obsess over things you cannot change, but identity is something you need to provide for your children. That’s what globalization eventually deprives all of us of.
    , @AP
    If it's a consolation - it's not an uncommon feeling. Unfortunately for you, there is not a diaspora community of similar individuals with similar backgrounds to you, you might have had a community.

    I grew up not too close to my diaspora. My best friend in HS was a kid with German parents. I dated an exchange student. In university, also almost always among foreigners, eventually marrying one. Perhaps the trick to not feel uncomfortable is not to take too seriously a personal national identity. You come from aristocracy, right? In that case your family tradition was always to be different from the masses around you, this may have been national also. Think in such terms, not focusing on alienation from the happy hobbits in your Midwestern idyll with whom you feel such a distance. But don't allow your distance to become contempt, despite temptation.

    , @Polish Perspective

    And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can’t connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn’t know this in 1974.
     
    I've always found it distasteful when European nationalists disparage and mock Americans for being "mutts" and "not having a real identity". I hope you didn't absorb too much of that. American whites did go through ethnogenesis. Just as Swabians and the other German regional identities underwent ethnogensis to become Germans, a country which is actually younger than America.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     
    Do your kids know Swedish?
    , @Ali Choudhury
    I had a few friends who felt the same dislocation. That generally abated after they married and had children and had no time to do anything but work\sleep\look after the kids.
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  114. @Thorfinnsson
    Since we are all "nationalists", I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:


    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American--I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The "immigrant nation" stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don't blame you or Patrick's parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can't connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn't know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     

    Did you really write that and feel like that?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Yes. :(
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  115. @German_reader
    Did you really write that and feel like that?

    Yes. :(

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    Sounds bad, I feel sorry for you.
    I get the impression though that America doesn't even work that well for many people with deep roots in the country nowadays. If you define a country solely by reference to abstract values and have permanent mass immigration, that's bound to be pretty alienating.
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  116. @Thorfinnsson
    Yes. :(

    Sounds bad, I feel sorry for you.
    I get the impression though that America doesn’t even work that well for many people with deep roots in the country nowadays. If you define a country solely by reference to abstract values and have permanent mass immigration, that’s bound to be pretty alienating.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I am going to redeem this country.

    I don't know how yet, but I will.

    Thank you for your kind remarks. I appreciate it.
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  117. @German_reader
    Sounds bad, I feel sorry for you.
    I get the impression though that America doesn't even work that well for many people with deep roots in the country nowadays. If you define a country solely by reference to abstract values and have permanent mass immigration, that's bound to be pretty alienating.

    I am going to redeem this country.

    I don’t know how yet, but I will.

    Thank you for your kind remarks. I appreciate it.

    Read More
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  118. @for-the-record
    As my Lithuanian friends are wont to remind me, the geographic center of Europe is in
    Purnuškės, Lithuania

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Lithuania_Centre_of_Europe.jpg

    which I guess means that Hungary must be in southern Europe, or perhaps south-central Europe.

    Hungary claims the same:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographical_midpoint_of_Europe?wprov=sfti1

    It depends how you calculate or weight places like Iceland or Svalbard.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    So does Ukraine:

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/ukraine/rakhiv/attractions/geographical-centre-of-europe/a/poi-sig/1383331/360939
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  119. AP says:
    @reiner Tor
    Hungary claims the same:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographical_midpoint_of_Europe?wprov=sfti1

    It depends how you calculate or weight places like Iceland or Svalbard.
    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Part of then Hungary. Curious how the calculations slightly changed a few hundred kilometers to the east when it no longer belonged to Hungary.
    , @for-the-record
    So does Ukraine

    A map with various "centres",

    http://assets4.bigthink.com/system/idea_thumbnails/26658/size_896/europecropped.jpg?1295997571

    as well an interesting article setting out some of the history of the issue:

    http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/498-monumental-drift-europes-many-midpoints
    , @Dmitry
    AP have you been in these village?


    https://uzh-city.livejournal.com/10789.html

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  120. @Thorfinnsson
    Since we are all "nationalists", I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:


    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American--I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The "immigrant nation" stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don't blame you or Patrick's parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can't connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn't know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     

    I started to have similar feelings around age 32, by which time I had made a number of irreversible or near irreversible decisions.

    Anyway, it’s worthless to obsess over things you cannot change, but identity is something you need to provide for your children. That’s what globalization eventually deprives all of us of.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I get a little maudlin sometimes.

    To be clear I do not obsess over this in general, and am much more comfortable being an American than most other first generation people.

    I had the good fortune of growing up with upper class American WASPs who unthinkingly accepted me because I look, talk, and act like them. Right down to go-to-hell pants and boat shoes. But I still had the luxury of summers in Sweden with family.

    But yes, globalization eradicates identity. I understand that materialism is powerful and even important, but at the end of the day we're all here fighting for identity (and beauty--see BAP and Handsome Thursday).
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  121. @AP
    So does Ukraine:

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/ukraine/rakhiv/attractions/geographical-centre-of-europe/a/poi-sig/1383331/360939

    Part of then Hungary. Curious how the calculations slightly changed a few hundred kilometers to the east when it no longer belonged to Hungary.

    Read More
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  122. AP says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    Since we are all "nationalists", I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:


    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American--I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The "immigrant nation" stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don't blame you or Patrick's parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can't connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn't know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     

    If it’s a consolation – it’s not an uncommon feeling. Unfortunately for you, there is not a diaspora community of similar individuals with similar backgrounds to you, you might have had a community.

    I grew up not too close to my diaspora. My best friend in HS was a kid with German parents. I dated an exchange student. In university, also almost always among foreigners, eventually marrying one. Perhaps the trick to not feel uncomfortable is not to take too seriously a personal national identity. You come from aristocracy, right? In that case your family tradition was always to be different from the masses around you, this may have been national also. Think in such terms, not focusing on alienation from the happy hobbits in your Midwestern idyll with whom you feel such a distance. But don’t allow your distance to become contempt, despite temptation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).

    And I should point out the lack of large diaspora was helpful to me. It wasn't until I became a man that I started wondering about this. I'm much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.

    Like I told the Magyar Miracle, this is not actually that much of a problem for me. These days I feel more isolated as a result of class.

    And, of course, by personality. Probably like many of us.

    I have always enjoyed being different, but we different people still have a need to be heard. That's why the internet is such a godsend.

    Oddly one of my proletarian female employees seems to understand me and is very curious. But I can't get too close for very obvious reasons. None the less next weekend I will attend a charity benefit on behalf of her terminally ill daughter (talk about having real problems).

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  123. It is really astounding how badly the US does on health-related matters compared to its high national income.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    It's because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more. If Belgium had annexed Congo it would have much worse stats.
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  124. @Thorfinnsson
    Since we are all "nationalists", I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:


    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American--I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The "immigrant nation" stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don't blame you or Patrick's parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can't connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn't know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     

    And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can’t connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn’t know this in 1974.

    I’ve always found it distasteful when European nationalists disparage and mock Americans for being “mutts” and “not having a real identity”. I hope you didn’t absorb too much of that. American whites did go through ethnogenesis. Just as Swabians and the other German regional identities underwent ethnogensis to become Germans, a country which is actually younger than America.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.

    Do your kids know Swedish?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Do your kids know Swedish?
     
    He "dates" younger women and goes on sex trips to the Philippines. I doubt he has any children he recognizes.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    Americans have a real identity, in fact a glorious one which they deny themselves owing to what has happened in this country. My comment was about how I don't.

    I don't know anything about my kids as they are the result of R-selection.

    I mean future k-selected children I am planning on as legitimate heirs. Unless I marry a Swede, I will not teach them Swedish. I'm committed to this country.

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We're a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.

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  125. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @Polish Perspective

    And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can’t connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn’t know this in 1974.
     
    I've always found it distasteful when European nationalists disparage and mock Americans for being "mutts" and "not having a real identity". I hope you didn't absorb too much of that. American whites did go through ethnogenesis. Just as Swabians and the other German regional identities underwent ethnogensis to become Germans, a country which is actually younger than America.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     
    Do your kids know Swedish?

    Do your kids know Swedish?

    He “dates” younger women and goes on sex trips to the Philippines. I doubt he has any children he recognizes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    The Philippines?

    Never been there.

    Where do you get this stuff?
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  126. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:

    I will be departing for Romania very early tomorrow. Any last tips/recs?

    Since this blog is in particular interested in ethnography can you go to the two counties in the middle of Transylvania that are majority Hungarian? I would like to hear your observations on how the Hungarian minority has avoided assimilation. Are they constantly hostile towards the majority (e.g. grocery clerks only speaking Hungarian to keep Romanians out)? What other strategies do the Hungarians use?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The strategy they used was having come under Romanian rule relatively recently, only a century ago. The majority Hungarian areas are constantly shrinking.
    , @Yevardian
    Many of them in fact speak very poor Romanian. Outside of the major cities they mostly live in self-segregated villages. Driving through such areas you see Sekely flags or Hungarian tricolours everywhere.
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  127. @Anonymous

    I will be departing for Romania very early tomorrow. Any last tips/recs?
     
    Since this blog is in particular interested in ethnography can you go to the two counties in the middle of Transylvania that are majority Hungarian? I would like to hear your observations on how the Hungarian minority has avoided assimilation. Are they constantly hostile towards the majority (e.g. grocery clerks only speaking Hungarian to keep Romanians out)? What other strategies do the Hungarians use?

    The strategy they used was having come under Romanian rule relatively recently, only a century ago. The majority Hungarian areas are constantly shrinking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Oh c'mon. The treaty ceding over Transylvania from Hungary to Romania was 99 years, 6 months ago. Considering one county is even 75% Hungarian according to the last census, the decline isn't happening very fast.

    I'm also curious to know what is the scholastic performance and overall quality of life of Hungarians in Romania versus Romanians. A popular explanation from American sociologists for explaining the test gap between whites and blacks in America is that there is a residual benefit to academic performance for students from a historically privileged group in a herrenvolk society. The poorer performance of Afrikaners compared to the English in South Africa is given as an example of this phenomenon. Considering Hungarians ran things for so long in Romania, even if they had a lot of property confiscated, they should still perform better than Romanians according to the idea.
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  128. Mitleser says:
    @for-the-record
    As my Lithuanian friends are wont to remind me, the geographic center of Europe is in
    Purnuškės, Lithuania

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Lithuania_Centre_of_Europe.jpg

    which I guess means that Hungary must be in southern Europe, or perhaps south-central Europe.

    Lithuania? Never! Germany is center.

    GADHEIM, POPULATION 89, IS A quiet village surrounded by farms in central Germany’s wine country. It may be just a small dot on the map, but Gadheim is about to be a symbolically important dot. When Brexit is finalized in 2019, the town will be the new geographic center of the European Union.

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler. An EU flag will soon fly there to mark the spot, but Kessler has mixed feelings about the designation. “The fact that it’s only happening because of this Brexit is a bit of a shame for me,” she told German news site The Local.

    The geographic center of the EU shifts each time a country joins or leaves. The current center is in Westerngrund, about 37 miles northwest of Gadheim, but it has only held the title since 2013, when Croatia joined the coalition. Before that, the inclusion of Bulgaria and Romania put the center in Meerholz, Germany. If Scotland votes to withdraw from the United Kingdom and independently rejoin the EU, the geographic center will move (slightly) once again, back toward Westerngrund.

    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/geographic-center-european-union-brexit

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler.
     
    *giggles* The new cartographic center of the EU is a field of rape.
    , @songbird
    But we must calculate based on Juncker's future plans: what will be the center when Turkey and all the MENA countries are added?
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  129. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @reiner Tor
    The strategy they used was having come under Romanian rule relatively recently, only a century ago. The majority Hungarian areas are constantly shrinking.

    Oh c’mon. The treaty ceding over Transylvania from Hungary to Romania was 99 years, 6 months ago. Considering one county is even 75% Hungarian according to the last census, the decline isn’t happening very fast.

    I’m also curious to know what is the scholastic performance and overall quality of life of Hungarians in Romania versus Romanians. A popular explanation from American sociologists for explaining the test gap between whites and blacks in America is that there is a residual benefit to academic performance for students from a historically privileged group in a herrenvolk society. The poorer performance of Afrikaners compared to the English in South Africa is given as an example of this phenomenon. Considering Hungarians ran things for so long in Romania, even if they had a lot of property confiscated, they should still perform better than Romanians according to the idea.

    Read More
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  130. Mitleser says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Not as much as the Czechs, who are hypersensitive about it, but I am certainly annoyed by the rather large amount of Poles who indeed are.

    Poland is fundamentally not a Western country. The arguments I've heard in favor of it ("we used the latin alphabet while the East used cyrillic!") or ("we were the last bastion of Latin Christendom against the barbarous Eastern Orthodox!") are all unconvincing. Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there's always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly "sarmatians" and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we're supposedly these 'Central Europeans'. It's all rather bullshit to me.

    I pin it down to status anxiety, and not much else. It's a sad reflection on how insecure many Poles feel about their own culture and history, as well as many other Eastern European peoples, because deep down they know we belong to the Eastern sphere in a very decisive way and we're just larping as Westerners.

    This is amplified with the significant amount of Russophobia in Poland. We have far more in common culturally and socially with Russians than we do with the French, despite being supposed 'enemies' with Russia. We are not Westerners and this 'we wuz Central Europeans' is an attempt at that.

    Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there’s always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly “sarmatians” and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we’re supposedly these ‘Central Europeans’. It’s all rather bullshit to me.

    Barbarian man of Poland [Boluniya] in the Great Western Ocean, and his barbarian wife + random bear

    This country is east of Germany. Because the area is frigid, its inhabitants all wear coats of fox pelt even into early summer. The Poles like sword-fighting, and they also train bears in their houses and make them perform tricks. The women are in charge of all household affairs. Their laws are harsh both within and abroad. This country produces amber.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/China/comments/7wrgvs/18thcentury_chinese_drawing_of_a_swiss_mercenary/du2mb2c/

    Bear Poland could be described as Eastern, but Poland was moved westwards in the last century, hence Central Europeans is the correct term for the new Poles.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polish Perspective

    Poland was moved westwards in the last century
     
    Yes, was moved rather than has moved. You're using the correct terminology, which implies that our movement was done by others (Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia) because of external circumstances (WWII and the Cold War) and we just adapted to those. These movements are recent in our long life as a nation and should be seen as historical anomalies.

    Over the next 20 years, as the boomers die off, we will start the procress of rebalancing. The Western orientation will still remain dominant, as we are part of the EU, but it won't be overwhelming as it is now. Most Young Poles want a balanced mix, whereas most Hungarians and Czechs want to remain totally in the Western camp.

    https://i.imgur.com/81OmSQP.png

    The Polish Boomer question which I keep harping on is very real.

    https://i.imgur.com/nTjGVJv.png

    We will never be as Eastern as Russia simply because our geography does not allow for it, rather we will move towards a hybrid culture with a stronger re-orientation towards our long-neglected Eastern heritage while still balancing the Western impulses. That is not as far as I'd like to go, but it will nevertheless be better than the blatant and inauthentic LARPing as Westerners and the absurd denial far too many Poles engage in that we have strong roots in Eastern Europe, to a frankly much greater extent than the Czechs.

    https://lowiczanka.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/polmap.jpg

    , @songbird
    Quite a tangent - but I have always been a fan of the Berlin Bear and the other heraldic symbols and flags of German cities. I know that a lot of people don't like the current flag of Germany - but it is my hope that Germans will someday rally locally along these great, old feudalistic symbols.
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  131. Anonymous[123] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mitleser
    Lithuania? Never! Germany is center.

    GADHEIM, POPULATION 89, IS A quiet village surrounded by farms in central Germany’s wine country. It may be just a small dot on the map, but Gadheim is about to be a symbolically important dot. When Brexit is finalized in 2019, the town will be the new geographic center of the European Union.

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler. An EU flag will soon fly there to mark the spot, but Kessler has mixed feelings about the designation. “The fact that it’s only happening because of this Brexit is a bit of a shame for me,” she told German news site The Local.

    The geographic center of the EU shifts each time a country joins or leaves. The current center is in Westerngrund, about 37 miles northwest of Gadheim, but it has only held the title since 2013, when Croatia joined the coalition. Before that, the inclusion of Bulgaria and Romania put the center in Meerholz, Germany. If Scotland votes to withdraw from the United Kingdom and independently rejoin the EU, the geographic center will move (slightly) once again, back toward Westerngrund.
     
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/geographic-center-european-union-brexit

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler.

    *giggles* The new cartographic center of the EU is a field of rape.

    Read More
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  132. ERM says:
    @utu
    If Poland is to be Eastern European who is left to be Central European? Austrians and Czechs only? Do we need this Central European term for just two inky dinky countries? Then we could say we have Eastern and Western Europe plus Austria and Czechia which also happen to be in Europe.

    I looked up about Czechs and how they feel about it. Indeed they seem to be touchy. More so than I would fit my concept of Czechs.

    Anyway, it is all a pointless nonsense.

    The Czechs are capable of being self-aware about this particular hang-up. There is a famous Czech comedy set in 1946, where the father of the main character gives a patriotic speech that includes the line. “We’re Slavs! But Western Slavs!”

    For me, the concept of Central Europe is inseparable from the legacy of the former Habsburg realm. There’s a certain architectural, culinary, bureaucratic, and general cultural overlay in those areas that you notice the presence or absence of when passing in or out of the region. Even a dimwit wouldn’t take too long to start suspecting that Budapest and Prague used to be in the same country, or that Vienna was too but Berlin wasn’t.

    Read More
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  133. @Mitleser

    Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there’s always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly “sarmatians” and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we’re supposedly these ‘Central Europeans’. It’s all rather bullshit to me.
     

    https://i.imgur.com/LYsBIyI.png

    Barbarian man of Poland [Boluniya] in the Great Western Ocean, and his barbarian wife + random bear
     

    This country is east of Germany. Because the area is frigid, its inhabitants all wear coats of fox pelt even into early summer. The Poles like sword-fighting, and they also train bears in their houses and make them perform tricks. The women are in charge of all household affairs. Their laws are harsh both within and abroad. This country produces amber.
     
    https://www.reddit.com/r/China/comments/7wrgvs/18thcentury_chinese_drawing_of_a_swiss_mercenary/du2mb2c/

    Bear Poland could be described as Eastern, but Poland was moved westwards in the last century, hence Central Europeans is the correct term for the new Poles.

    Poland was moved westwards in the last century

    Yes, was moved rather than has moved. You’re using the correct terminology, which implies that our movement was done by others (Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia) because of external circumstances (WWII and the Cold War) and we just adapted to those. These movements are recent in our long life as a nation and should be seen as historical anomalies.

    Over the next 20 years, as the boomers die off, we will start the procress of rebalancing. The Western orientation will still remain dominant, as we are part of the EU, but it won’t be overwhelming as it is now. Most Young Poles want a balanced mix, whereas most Hungarians and Czechs want to remain totally in the Western camp.

    The Polish Boomer question which I keep harping on is very real.

    We will never be as Eastern as Russia simply because our geography does not allow for it, rather we will move towards a hybrid culture with a stronger re-orientation towards our long-neglected Eastern heritage while still balancing the Western impulses. That is not as far as I’d like to go, but it will nevertheless be better than the blatant and inauthentic LARPing as Westerners and the absurd denial far too many Poles engage in that we have strong roots in Eastern Europe, to a frankly much greater extent than the Czechs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Poland, of course, would’ve been much better off without the war, inside its pre-1938 borders. I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless. It’d probably be different if there was a strong German nationalism, then they’d feel under threat and be more nationalistic, similarly to how eastern Germans felt under Polish threat between the wars and voted nationalist. But as it is, it’s not very good for Poland, though of course changing the borders would be pointless now.
    , @reiner Tor
    Regarding Jobbik. They are currently slightly to the left of Fidesz for most practical purposes.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    The school mentioned above taught anti-science views (I think they rejected the theory of evolution, for example - it might endear them to some commenters but not to others), and while I’m unsure about the school itself, but some of the Vona supporters or moderates continue to be extremists when it comes to the idiotic we wuz kangs (we wuz Sumerians, we wuz Jesus Christ, etc.) strain of Hungarian nationalism, which came into being after the war in the emigration, and possibly was a diversion created or cultivated by the communist intelligence services, but which definitely took on a life of its own.

    As to their alliance with the leftists. Since 2014 they have been doing that in by-elections (but not in the general election), and they openly stated the possibility of an electoral agreement with one of the leftist parties, LMP, which was founded only in 2009, and which until the election explicitly rejected any cooperation with the other leftist parties (whose main forces are the former communist socialists and a spinoff of the socialists, therefore implicated in both pre-1990 communism and the horrible 2002-10 leftist government), and they had been better on most questions than the other leftist parties. I think it might have been possible to form a coalition with them where they accept strict immigration enforcement etc. in exchange for some minor concessions. However, since their former leader resigned in 2016, they seem to be drifting leftwards, so probably they will now just join the rest of the leftist parties. I don’t know if Jobbik will ever consider joining up with these, or what will happen.

    It must be noted that Fidesz tried really hard to push them to the left, probably because after moderating their image, they seemed to be more dangerous than the socialists. So they gave them an extreme fine for doing something which Fidesz also did. (All opposition parties received fines, except smaller. Fidesz didn’t receive, because - you want believe it - the authorities only audited the opposition parties, they explained that they were not chosen randomly.)

    Jobbik now has no money (because of the extreme fine) to run a candidate in the by-election, so they decided to just support it. Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.
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  134. @Polish Perspective

    Poland was moved westwards in the last century
     
    Yes, was moved rather than has moved. You're using the correct terminology, which implies that our movement was done by others (Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia) because of external circumstances (WWII and the Cold War) and we just adapted to those. These movements are recent in our long life as a nation and should be seen as historical anomalies.

    Over the next 20 years, as the boomers die off, we will start the procress of rebalancing. The Western orientation will still remain dominant, as we are part of the EU, but it won't be overwhelming as it is now. Most Young Poles want a balanced mix, whereas most Hungarians and Czechs want to remain totally in the Western camp.

    https://i.imgur.com/81OmSQP.png

    The Polish Boomer question which I keep harping on is very real.

    https://i.imgur.com/nTjGVJv.png

    We will never be as Eastern as Russia simply because our geography does not allow for it, rather we will move towards a hybrid culture with a stronger re-orientation towards our long-neglected Eastern heritage while still balancing the Western impulses. That is not as far as I'd like to go, but it will nevertheless be better than the blatant and inauthentic LARPing as Westerners and the absurd denial far too many Poles engage in that we have strong roots in Eastern Europe, to a frankly much greater extent than the Czechs.

    https://lowiczanka.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/polmap.jpg

    Poland, of course, would’ve been much better off without the war, inside its pre-1938 borders. I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless. It’d probably be different if there was a strong German nationalism, then they’d feel under threat and be more nationalistic, similarly to how eastern Germans felt under Polish threat between the wars and voted nationalist. But as it is, it’s not very good for Poland, though of course changing the borders would be pointless now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser

    I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless.
     
    Just like Western Poland.

    http://assets3.bigthink.com/system/tinymce_assets/3769/original/Poland_Germany_Election_Map.png

    https://i.imgur.com/mMGYYva.jpg
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  135. @Polish Perspective

    Poland was moved westwards in the last century
     
    Yes, was moved rather than has moved. You're using the correct terminology, which implies that our movement was done by others (Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia) because of external circumstances (WWII and the Cold War) and we just adapted to those. These movements are recent in our long life as a nation and should be seen as historical anomalies.

    Over the next 20 years, as the boomers die off, we will start the procress of rebalancing. The Western orientation will still remain dominant, as we are part of the EU, but it won't be overwhelming as it is now. Most Young Poles want a balanced mix, whereas most Hungarians and Czechs want to remain totally in the Western camp.

    https://i.imgur.com/81OmSQP.png

    The Polish Boomer question which I keep harping on is very real.

    https://i.imgur.com/nTjGVJv.png

    We will never be as Eastern as Russia simply because our geography does not allow for it, rather we will move towards a hybrid culture with a stronger re-orientation towards our long-neglected Eastern heritage while still balancing the Western impulses. That is not as far as I'd like to go, but it will nevertheless be better than the blatant and inauthentic LARPing as Westerners and the absurd denial far too many Poles engage in that we have strong roots in Eastern Europe, to a frankly much greater extent than the Czechs.

    https://lowiczanka.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/polmap.jpg

    Regarding Jobbik. They are currently slightly to the left of Fidesz for most practical purposes.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    The school mentioned above taught anti-science views (I think they rejected the theory of evolution, for example – it might endear them to some commenters but not to others), and while I’m unsure about the school itself, but some of the Vona supporters or moderates continue to be extremists when it comes to the idiotic we wuz kangs (we wuz Sumerians, we wuz Jesus Christ, etc.) strain of Hungarian nationalism, which came into being after the war in the emigration, and possibly was a diversion created or cultivated by the communist intelligence services, but which definitely took on a life of its own.

    As to their alliance with the leftists. Since 2014 they have been doing that in by-elections (but not in the general election), and they openly stated the possibility of an electoral agreement with one of the leftist parties, LMP, which was founded only in 2009, and which until the election explicitly rejected any cooperation with the other leftist parties (whose main forces are the former communist socialists and a spinoff of the socialists, therefore implicated in both pre-1990 communism and the horrible 2002-10 leftist government), and they had been better on most questions than the other leftist parties. I think it might have been possible to form a coalition with them where they accept strict immigration enforcement etc. in exchange for some minor concessions. However, since their former leader resigned in 2016, they seem to be drifting leftwards, so probably they will now just join the rest of the leftist parties. I don’t know if Jobbik will ever consider joining up with these, or what will happen.

    It must be noted that Fidesz tried really hard to push them to the left, probably because after moderating their image, they seemed to be more dangerous than the socialists. So they gave them an extreme fine for doing something which Fidesz also did. (All opposition parties received fines, except smaller. Fidesz didn’t receive, because – you want believe it – the authorities only audited the opposition parties, they explained that they were not chosen randomly.)

    Jobbik now has no money (because of the extreme fine) to run a candidate in the by-election, so they decided to just support it. Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Regarding LMP. They are nominally a green party, and they took it seriously, so they were anti-globalists and anti-TTIP etc. They weren’t that good news for the globalist masters, except that I’d expect them to cave in at the end, just as Tsipras did. Anyway, now they are about to split up with the majority just joining up with the socialists. It’s somewhat surprising, because in 2013 they already had a split with a minority of them joining the socialists and leaving the party. But apparently now those who stayed have no better idea either.
    , @Polish Perspective
    Thank you for the native account.


    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.
     
    That's the part which I still struggle with, if they weren't genuine far-right, how come nobody caught them. Or if they were - and presumably still are - then I fail to see the 4D chess here.

    It seems the most banal explanation is also the most likely: they never had any real principles and just went for whatever the most expedient position was possible at the time. Though your point about Vona setting up a traditionalist academy seems to fly in the face of that thesis.

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly. It's definitely an issue that I will track over the years, maybe there will be a book by some of the insiders. I am still holding out for the June 23rd platform fight for Jobbik. It seems that the challenger has about half the party with him and at least that is something he could salvage.

    Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.
     
    Depressing tactic even if the stakes are low. The most optimistic interpretation is that Fidesz doesn't really believe that BS but feels compelled to push it since it's (comparatively) liberal Budapest.

    Regarding LMP. They are nominally a green party, and they took it seriously, so they were anti-globalists and anti-TTIP etc. They weren’t that good news for the globalist masters, except that I’d expect them to cave in at the end, just as Tsipras did. Anyway, now they are about to split up with the majority just joining up with the socialists. It’s somewhat surprising, because in 2013 they already had a split with a minority of them joining the socialists and leaving the party. But apparently now those who stayed have no better idea either.
     
    Hopefully they could evolve to play the same role that M5S plays in Italy. There is certainly common currency between right and left on stuff like globalisation, free trade, neoliberal economics etc. M5S is deeply split on the issue of migration (and similar identity issues), though I am too lacking in knowledge of the Hungarian left to make any judgement on those guys. It was my impression that much of the Hungarian left are some of the worst shitlibs imaginable (some were even outright calling for tearing down the border fence, IIRC). Is there space for a pragmatic left? From your words, it seems the mainstream socialists are just eating them all up. Are there factions within the socialists who would possibly emulate the stance of M5S?
    , @DFH
    Yet more evidence that Evola, Spengler and their ilk should be vigorously purged from nationalist thought
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  136. @reiner Tor
    Regarding Jobbik. They are currently slightly to the left of Fidesz for most practical purposes.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    The school mentioned above taught anti-science views (I think they rejected the theory of evolution, for example - it might endear them to some commenters but not to others), and while I’m unsure about the school itself, but some of the Vona supporters or moderates continue to be extremists when it comes to the idiotic we wuz kangs (we wuz Sumerians, we wuz Jesus Christ, etc.) strain of Hungarian nationalism, which came into being after the war in the emigration, and possibly was a diversion created or cultivated by the communist intelligence services, but which definitely took on a life of its own.

    As to their alliance with the leftists. Since 2014 they have been doing that in by-elections (but not in the general election), and they openly stated the possibility of an electoral agreement with one of the leftist parties, LMP, which was founded only in 2009, and which until the election explicitly rejected any cooperation with the other leftist parties (whose main forces are the former communist socialists and a spinoff of the socialists, therefore implicated in both pre-1990 communism and the horrible 2002-10 leftist government), and they had been better on most questions than the other leftist parties. I think it might have been possible to form a coalition with them where they accept strict immigration enforcement etc. in exchange for some minor concessions. However, since their former leader resigned in 2016, they seem to be drifting leftwards, so probably they will now just join the rest of the leftist parties. I don’t know if Jobbik will ever consider joining up with these, or what will happen.

    It must be noted that Fidesz tried really hard to push them to the left, probably because after moderating their image, they seemed to be more dangerous than the socialists. So they gave them an extreme fine for doing something which Fidesz also did. (All opposition parties received fines, except smaller. Fidesz didn’t receive, because - you want believe it - the authorities only audited the opposition parties, they explained that they were not chosen randomly.)

    Jobbik now has no money (because of the extreme fine) to run a candidate in the by-election, so they decided to just support it. Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.

    Regarding LMP. They are nominally a green party, and they took it seriously, so they were anti-globalists and anti-TTIP etc. They weren’t that good news for the globalist masters, except that I’d expect them to cave in at the end, just as Tsipras did. Anyway, now they are about to split up with the majority just joining up with the socialists. It’s somewhat surprising, because in 2013 they already had a split with a minority of them joining the socialists and leaving the party. But apparently now those who stayed have no better idea either.

    Read More
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  137. AP says:
    @Polish Perspective
    https://i.imgur.com/NhCK6iu.png

    It is really astounding how badly the US does on health-related matters compared to its high national income.

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more. If Belgium had annexed Congo it would have much worse stats.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Hispanics’ life expectancy is longer than that of whites. Probably good Amerindian genetics.

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/usa/life-expectancy-hispanic

    , @Polish Perspective

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.
     
    Not sure about the Mexican part.

    https://i.imgur.com/TdvZi3e.png

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing.

    https://i.imgur.com/yQDmyE4.png

    Finally, the US life expectancy actually fell in the last recorded year we have (2016) and the white death rate, particularly among the high-school educated white middle-age men, is now as high as it was in Russia in the 1990s, except that the US has (on paper) a booming economy.
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  138. @AP
    It's because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more. If Belgium had annexed Congo it would have much worse stats.

    Hispanics’ life expectancy is longer than that of whites. Probably good Amerindian genetics.

    http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/usa/life-expectancy-hispanic

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  139. @reiner Tor
    I started to have similar feelings around age 32, by which time I had made a number of irreversible or near irreversible decisions.

    Anyway, it’s worthless to obsess over things you cannot change, but identity is something you need to provide for your children. That’s what globalization eventually deprives all of us of.

    I get a little maudlin sometimes.

    To be clear I do not obsess over this in general, and am much more comfortable being an American than most other first generation people.

    I had the good fortune of growing up with upper class American WASPs who unthinkingly accepted me because I look, talk, and act like them. Right down to go-to-hell pants and boat shoes. But I still had the luxury of summers in Sweden with family.

    But yes, globalization eradicates identity. I understand that materialism is powerful and even important, but at the end of the day we’re all here fighting for identity (and beauty–see BAP and Handsome Thursday).

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  140. @AP
    If it's a consolation - it's not an uncommon feeling. Unfortunately for you, there is not a diaspora community of similar individuals with similar backgrounds to you, you might have had a community.

    I grew up not too close to my diaspora. My best friend in HS was a kid with German parents. I dated an exchange student. In university, also almost always among foreigners, eventually marrying one. Perhaps the trick to not feel uncomfortable is not to take too seriously a personal national identity. You come from aristocracy, right? In that case your family tradition was always to be different from the masses around you, this may have been national also. Think in such terms, not focusing on alienation from the happy hobbits in your Midwestern idyll with whom you feel such a distance. But don't allow your distance to become contempt, despite temptation.

    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).

    And I should point out the lack of large diaspora was helpful to me. It wasn’t until I became a man that I started wondering about this. I’m much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.

    Like I told the Magyar Miracle, this is not actually that much of a problem for me. These days I feel more isolated as a result of class.

    And, of course, by personality. Probably like many of us.

    I have always enjoyed being different, but we different people still have a need to be heard. That’s why the internet is such a godsend.

    Oddly one of my proletarian female employees seems to understand me and is very curious. But I can’t get too close for very obvious reasons. None the less next weekend I will attend a charity benefit on behalf of her terminally ill daughter (talk about having real problems).

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    • Replies: @AP

    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).
     
    There was a nice pancake place in the old Swedish neighborhood, which has become Chicago's lesbian neighborhood (Ukrainian village has a bit of a hipster infestation, but the Ukrainians are holding on - advertising for rent only in the Ukrainian language is a great way of keeping a neighborhood intact without getting in trouble).

    I’m much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.
     
    TBH this is my solitary hobby; I don't play videogames or watch TV shows on my own. I devote a couple hours daily to it (I go to bed late) but my "work" here is not representative of daily life. Now a patient is filling out paperwork and completing surveys so I'm here.

    I had a circle of eastern European friends from various countries with whom we had often passionate political debates; most of us have gone our separate ways so this is a nice outlet for that sort of thing. As you wrote, the internet is great for such things.
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  141. Mitleser says:
    @reiner Tor
    Poland, of course, would’ve been much better off without the war, inside its pre-1938 borders. I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless. It’d probably be different if there was a strong German nationalism, then they’d feel under threat and be more nationalistic, similarly to how eastern Germans felt under Polish threat between the wars and voted nationalist. But as it is, it’s not very good for Poland, though of course changing the borders would be pointless now.

    I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless.

    Just like Western Poland.

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    • Replies: @Polish Perspective
    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    In other words, the populations who live there now have historically nothing to do with German influence, which is the impression one who is not fluent in Polish history could easily get, which is why the meme map became popular in the first place ("close to the German border = must mean that they are liberal-minded!").

    That's problematic for entirely different reasons, of course, since it implies that Polish liberalism is more deeply rooted and cannot be explained away on muh Germans/Germanic influence.

    , @utu
    This map should be used to teach people about what are the foundations of conservative and liberal sentiments. It all comes down to the connection to soil. The Poles in the western Poland lost that connection. They got uprooted. This changed their outlook.

    Bolsheviks new exactly what they were doing when the decided to exterminate kulaks. People with connection to land which thew owned could not be turned into a New Man. They would not buy indoctrination into some abstract notions.

    Capitalists and liberals love immigrants for exactly the same reason. Uprooted people can be indoctrinated and 'modernized.'

    To be modern means to be uprooted w/o a connection to the soil. Jews were always the vanguard of modernity. Modernity is Jewish. The question one should ask who ends up owning all the land in the end.
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  142. @Polish Perspective

    And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can’t connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn’t know this in 1974.
     
    I've always found it distasteful when European nationalists disparage and mock Americans for being "mutts" and "not having a real identity". I hope you didn't absorb too much of that. American whites did go through ethnogenesis. Just as Swabians and the other German regional identities underwent ethnogensis to become Germans, a country which is actually younger than America.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     
    Do your kids know Swedish?

    Americans have a real identity, in fact a glorious one which they deny themselves owing to what has happened in this country. My comment was about how I don’t.

    I don’t know anything about my kids as they are the result of R-selection.

    I mean future k-selected children I am planning on as legitimate heirs. Unless I marry a Swede, I will not teach them Swedish. I’m committed to this country.

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We’re a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.

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    • Replies: @Polish Perspective

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We’re a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.
     
    They do it to themselves, too. I noticed this strain of smugness in Denmark, even if Denmark is just Sweden T-minus 20 years. It's all very narrow-minded and idiotic, but I can't say that Polish nationalists are any better. My 'debate' with Another Polish Perspective showed as much. Many still live in a fantasy world where Poland will just magically skate by and be largely untouched.

    As they say: we either hang in there together or we'll be hanged separately.
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  143. @AP
    It's because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more. If Belgium had annexed Congo it would have much worse stats.

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.

    Not sure about the Mexican part.

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing.

    Finally, the US life expectancy actually fell in the last recorded year we have (2016) and the white death rate, particularly among the high-school educated white middle-age men, is now as high as it was in Russia in the 1990s, except that the US has (on paper) a booming economy.

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    • Replies: @AP

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.
    Not sure about the Mexican part.
     
    They impact educational statistics.

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing
     
    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it's about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.

    :::::::::::::

    In general, across all stats (crime, education, health) Americans of Europrn descent are within the range of people in Europe. America only looks "worse" when its large third-worldish population is added to produce a misleading overall "average."
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  144. @Mitleser

    I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless.
     
    Just like Western Poland.

    http://assets3.bigthink.com/system/tinymce_assets/3769/original/Poland_Germany_Election_Map.png

    https://i.imgur.com/mMGYYva.jpg

    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    In other words, the populations who live there now have historically nothing to do with German influence, which is the impression one who is not fluent in Polish history could easily get, which is why the meme map became popular in the first place (“close to the German border = must mean that they are liberal-minded!”).

    That’s problematic for entirely different reasons, of course, since it implies that Polish liberalism is more deeply rooted and cannot be explained away on muh Germans/Germanic influence.

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    • Replies: @Mitleser

    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.
     
    That is what I meant.
    They are descendants of uprooted Poles and have weaker roots than the Poles in the South-East.
    , @reiner Tor

    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.
     
    I first met that map on a Hungarian nationalist forum, and the explanation was largely that the population is probably rootless as a result of being transplanted from Eastern Poland.
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  145. @Thorfinnsson
    Americans have a real identity, in fact a glorious one which they deny themselves owing to what has happened in this country. My comment was about how I don't.

    I don't know anything about my kids as they are the result of R-selection.

    I mean future k-selected children I am planning on as legitimate heirs. Unless I marry a Swede, I will not teach them Swedish. I'm committed to this country.

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We're a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We’re a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.

    They do it to themselves, too. I noticed this strain of smugness in Denmark, even if Denmark is just Sweden T-minus 20 years. It’s all very narrow-minded and idiotic, but I can’t say that Polish nationalists are any better. My ‘debate’ with Another Polish Perspective showed as much. Many still live in a fantasy world where Poland will just magically skate by and be largely untouched.

    As they say: we either hang in there together or we’ll be hanged separately.

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    • Replies: @songbird

    Many still live in a fantasy world where Poland will just magically skate by and be largely untouched.
     
    Germany is the strategic heart of Europe - that is why I am very much concerned over Germany, even above other parts of Europe. I'm not saying Arabs and blacks have good militarily skills or anything, but it will make things much more difficult if it is lost - no part of Western Europe will be safe, especially given the complicated demographic situation in other countries. Meanwhile, they would control any entrance into the Baltic Sea.
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  146. @reiner Tor
    Regarding Jobbik. They are currently slightly to the left of Fidesz for most practical purposes.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    The school mentioned above taught anti-science views (I think they rejected the theory of evolution, for example - it might endear them to some commenters but not to others), and while I’m unsure about the school itself, but some of the Vona supporters or moderates continue to be extremists when it comes to the idiotic we wuz kangs (we wuz Sumerians, we wuz Jesus Christ, etc.) strain of Hungarian nationalism, which came into being after the war in the emigration, and possibly was a diversion created or cultivated by the communist intelligence services, but which definitely took on a life of its own.

    As to their alliance with the leftists. Since 2014 they have been doing that in by-elections (but not in the general election), and they openly stated the possibility of an electoral agreement with one of the leftist parties, LMP, which was founded only in 2009, and which until the election explicitly rejected any cooperation with the other leftist parties (whose main forces are the former communist socialists and a spinoff of the socialists, therefore implicated in both pre-1990 communism and the horrible 2002-10 leftist government), and they had been better on most questions than the other leftist parties. I think it might have been possible to form a coalition with them where they accept strict immigration enforcement etc. in exchange for some minor concessions. However, since their former leader resigned in 2016, they seem to be drifting leftwards, so probably they will now just join the rest of the leftist parties. I don’t know if Jobbik will ever consider joining up with these, or what will happen.

    It must be noted that Fidesz tried really hard to push them to the left, probably because after moderating their image, they seemed to be more dangerous than the socialists. So they gave them an extreme fine for doing something which Fidesz also did. (All opposition parties received fines, except smaller. Fidesz didn’t receive, because - you want believe it - the authorities only audited the opposition parties, they explained that they were not chosen randomly.)

    Jobbik now has no money (because of the extreme fine) to run a candidate in the by-election, so they decided to just support it. Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.

    Thank you for the native account.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    That’s the part which I still struggle with, if they weren’t genuine far-right, how come nobody caught them. Or if they were – and presumably still are – then I fail to see the 4D chess here.

    It seems the most banal explanation is also the most likely: they never had any real principles and just went for whatever the most expedient position was possible at the time. Though your point about Vona setting up a traditionalist academy seems to fly in the face of that thesis.

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly. It’s definitely an issue that I will track over the years, maybe there will be a book by some of the insiders. I am still holding out for the June 23rd platform fight for Jobbik. It seems that the challenger has about half the party with him and at least that is something he could salvage.

    Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.

    Depressing tactic even if the stakes are low. The most optimistic interpretation is that Fidesz doesn’t really believe that BS but feels compelled to push it since it’s (comparatively) liberal Budapest.

    Regarding LMP. They are nominally a green party, and they took it seriously, so they were anti-globalists and anti-TTIP etc. They weren’t that good news for the globalist masters, except that I’d expect them to cave in at the end, just as Tsipras did. Anyway, now they are about to split up with the majority just joining up with the socialists. It’s somewhat surprising, because in 2013 they already had a split with a minority of them joining the socialists and leaving the party. But apparently now those who stayed have no better idea either.

    Hopefully they could evolve to play the same role that M5S plays in Italy. There is certainly common currency between right and left on stuff like globalisation, free trade, neoliberal economics etc. M5S is deeply split on the issue of migration (and similar identity issues), though I am too lacking in knowledge of the Hungarian left to make any judgement on those guys. It was my impression that much of the Hungarian left are some of the worst shitlibs imaginable (some were even outright calling for tearing down the border fence, IIRC). Is there space for a pragmatic left? From your words, it seems the mainstream socialists are just eating them all up. Are there factions within the socialists who would possibly emulate the stance of M5S?

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    • Replies: @utu

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly.
     
    What if the little political parties are a synthetic creation? The operator in charge of them can unfold them and fold them at will. There is a room for spontaneity but most of the dancing these parties do is controlled. Somebody else is in charge of music and tunes. Assuming for a moment that indeed the political landscape in various countries is under complete control one question must be asked: To what advantage Orban was allowed to operate and succeed?

    I would consider a possibility that Orban's Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America's Deep State with strong links to Israel. Somebody is holding a protective umbrella over these two countries. Orban can afford getting rid of Soros w/o being condemned and destroy with accusations of nationalism and anti-semitism. It is harder to understand recent attacks on Poland by Holocaust Industry because it can undermine Polish commitment to America.

    Poland and Hungary are there to keep Germany from gaining too much power. The whole anti-Russia hoopla masks the true purpose of this policy which is anti-German. Poland's Russophobia is kindled to keep Russia away from Germany. The Intermarium is a trick conjured by Trump while in Poland for consumption of Poles and V4. The incentive is letting V4 countries to have their sovereign immigration police at the expense of complete subjugation to American foreign policy.
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  147. Mitleser says:
    @Polish Perspective
    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    In other words, the populations who live there now have historically nothing to do with German influence, which is the impression one who is not fluent in Polish history could easily get, which is why the meme map became popular in the first place ("close to the German border = must mean that they are liberal-minded!").

    That's problematic for entirely different reasons, of course, since it implies that Polish liberalism is more deeply rooted and cannot be explained away on muh Germans/Germanic influence.

    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    That is what I meant.
    They are descendants of uprooted Poles and have weaker roots than the Poles in the South-East.

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  148. @Polish Perspective
    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    In other words, the populations who live there now have historically nothing to do with German influence, which is the impression one who is not fluent in Polish history could easily get, which is why the meme map became popular in the first place ("close to the German border = must mean that they are liberal-minded!").

    That's problematic for entirely different reasons, of course, since it implies that Polish liberalism is more deeply rooted and cannot be explained away on muh Germans/Germanic influence.

    The problem with that meme map is that most of the Poles who live in the western parts are actually transplanted Poles from Ukraine, Belarus etc.

    I first met that map on a Hungarian nationalist forum, and the explanation was largely that the population is probably rootless as a result of being transplanted from Eastern Poland.

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  149. @Thorfinnsson
    Since we are all "nationalists", I thought you would would all be interested in this section of an e-mail I just sent to my father:


    As you know, I too am an outsider. I did not emigrate. I feel at home in America and am American. But I am not really American--I have no connection to what the Americans have done. From the Revolution the the Moon Landing. I am in fact a stranger here. Lately I have realized this is one reason I hate immigration so much and want to end it. The "immigrant nation" stuff is a pack of lies Jack Kennedy invented to get elected.

    I don't blame you or Patrick's parents for leaving of course. Who knew the American dream was a pack of lies? And in the heady days of the first 30 years after World War 2 it seemed like anything was possible.

    The truth is history never left. And here I am, with no identity. The land of my forefathers is Sweden. But I speak broken, garbled Swedish. I can't connect with Swedes, Or Americans. Of course you didn't know this in 1974.

    I hope my children have a real identity. I wake up every day wondering who I am.
     

    I had a few friends who felt the same dislocation. That generally abated after they married and had children and had no time to do anything but work\sleep\look after the kids.

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  150. @Anonymous

    Do your kids know Swedish?
     
    He "dates" younger women and goes on sex trips to the Philippines. I doubt he has any children he recognizes.

    The Philippines?

    Never been there.

    Where do you get this stuff?

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  151. Mitleser says:

    So many (poor) Nigerians, wat do?

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The way I see it, nothing wrong with Nigeria that a few millennia of evolution couldn’t cure.
    , @songbird
    If you ever want to redpill someone on race - someone who is reachable - first make all the arguments: scientific, observation, and theory - and then finally hand them a book on worldwide development. Preferably, one with a Leftist or PC author, since the question of regional differences will need to be addressed, and the excuses given for Africa will be side-splittingly funny and transparently stupid.
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  152. @Mitleser
    So many (poor) Nigerians, wat do?

    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1002882522647105537

    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1002897620421898240

    The way I see it, nothing wrong with Nigeria that a few millennia of evolution couldn’t cure.

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    • Replies: @songbird
    They would probably need to live in a different environment though - perhaps South Africa or Lesotho would be enough. Assuming total isolation of Africa.

    Probably about the most un-PC thought you could have: HIV could lead to rapid African evolution, if we stop sending the pills.
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  153. utu says:
    @Mitleser

    I read that the formerly German areas vote consistently left, probably because the inhabitants are rootless.
     
    Just like Western Poland.

    http://assets3.bigthink.com/system/tinymce_assets/3769/original/Poland_Germany_Election_Map.png

    https://i.imgur.com/mMGYYva.jpg

    This map should be used to teach people about what are the foundations of conservative and liberal sentiments. It all comes down to the connection to soil. The Poles in the western Poland lost that connection. They got uprooted. This changed their outlook.

    Bolsheviks new exactly what they were doing when the decided to exterminate kulaks. People with connection to land which thew owned could not be turned into a New Man. They would not buy indoctrination into some abstract notions.

    Capitalists and liberals love immigrants for exactly the same reason. Uprooted people can be indoctrinated and ‘modernized.’

    To be modern means to be uprooted w/o a connection to the soil. Jews were always the vanguard of modernity. Modernity is Jewish. The question one should ask who ends up owning all the land in the end.

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    • Replies: @AP
    Great comment.

    In Ukriane the more "uprooted" population in the newly-settled southern and eastern parts have been more pro-Soviet or pro-Russian, while the older longer-settled core territory has been more pro-Western.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    I am not a farmer.

    But I feel a great connection to my home.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8d/Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG/1200px-Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG

    http://data2.finalsite.com/cf82/lakeforestschoolsorg/data/media/fullsize/1652.jpg?v=102516011440

    It is my dream to return and raise a family there.

    Whenever I pass through I make a point of driving past my childhood home.

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  154. AP says:
    @Polish Perspective

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.
     
    Not sure about the Mexican part.

    https://i.imgur.com/TdvZi3e.png

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing.

    https://i.imgur.com/yQDmyE4.png

    Finally, the US life expectancy actually fell in the last recorded year we have (2016) and the white death rate, particularly among the high-school educated white middle-age men, is now as high as it was in Russia in the 1990s, except that the US has (on paper) a booming economy.

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.
    Not sure about the Mexican part.

    They impact educational statistics.

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing

    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.

    :::::::::::::

    In general, across all stats (crime, education, health) Americans of Europrn descent are within the range of people in Europe. America only looks “worse” when its large third-worldish population is added to produce a misleading overall “average.”

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    • Replies: @Polish Perspective

    They impact educational statistics.
     
    Well, sure, but my contention was about health ;)

    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.
     
    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income. Even poorer countries like Spain or Italy do better.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized. Angus Deaton, who won a Nobel prize a few years ago, has been mostly focused on poor developing countries like India for much of his career but suddenly turned his gaze to the US and he made this observation few had done before. It's actually shocking that this demographic is now on par with their Russian equivalents in the 1990s, despite living in a much wealthier country with far lower unemployment. And then there's the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many 'flyover' places.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse. And as I pointed out, Latinos and Asians actually have higher life expectancy than US whites, while the gap with blacks is decreasing. Oh, and life expenctacy fell last year. I don't think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data. The US is not falling apart by any means, but given its sky-high per capita income, the fact that it spends a far greater share of its GDP on health than any other industrialised country, I do think it is fair to say it is underperforming. And I don't really buy that it is all due to non-whites. As I said: the data doesn't show that.

    In terms of education, economics, that's a different point entirely.
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  155. AP says:
    @utu
    This map should be used to teach people about what are the foundations of conservative and liberal sentiments. It all comes down to the connection to soil. The Poles in the western Poland lost that connection. They got uprooted. This changed their outlook.

    Bolsheviks new exactly what they were doing when the decided to exterminate kulaks. People with connection to land which thew owned could not be turned into a New Man. They would not buy indoctrination into some abstract notions.

    Capitalists and liberals love immigrants for exactly the same reason. Uprooted people can be indoctrinated and 'modernized.'

    To be modern means to be uprooted w/o a connection to the soil. Jews were always the vanguard of modernity. Modernity is Jewish. The question one should ask who ends up owning all the land in the end.

    Great comment.

    In Ukriane the more “uprooted” population in the newly-settled southern and eastern parts have been more pro-Soviet or pro-Russian, while the older longer-settled core territory has been more pro-Western.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gerard2

    In Ukriane the more “uprooted” population in the newly-settled southern and eastern parts have been more pro-Soviet or pro-Russian, while the older longer-settled core territory has been more pro-Western.
     
    ...again more stupidly braindead bollocks
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  156. AP says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).

    And I should point out the lack of large diaspora was helpful to me. It wasn't until I became a man that I started wondering about this. I'm much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.

    Like I told the Magyar Miracle, this is not actually that much of a problem for me. These days I feel more isolated as a result of class.

    And, of course, by personality. Probably like many of us.

    I have always enjoyed being different, but we different people still have a need to be heard. That's why the internet is such a godsend.

    Oddly one of my proletarian female employees seems to understand me and is very curious. But I can't get too close for very obvious reasons. None the less next weekend I will attend a charity benefit on behalf of her terminally ill daughter (talk about having real problems).

    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).

    There was a nice pancake place in the old Swedish neighborhood, which has become Chicago’s lesbian neighborhood (Ukrainian village has a bit of a hipster infestation, but the Ukrainians are holding on – advertising for rent only in the Ukrainian language is a great way of keeping a neighborhood intact without getting in trouble).

    I’m much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.

    TBH this is my solitary hobby; I don’t play videogames or watch TV shows on my own. I devote a couple hours daily to it (I go to bed late) but my “work” here is not representative of daily life. Now a patient is filling out paperwork and completing surveys so I’m here.

    I had a circle of eastern European friends from various countries with whom we had often passionate political debates; most of us have gone our separate ways so this is a nice outlet for that sort of thing. As you wrote, the internet is great for such things.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    I didn't mean that as a critique, despite my irritation over small states with marginal cultures. Simply a matter of fact.

    If you stick with this country your children will be as American as I am.

    And in this comment section we're building the Reptile Ragnarok. I am more impressed with you people than I have been anywhere else on the internet (in this political culture).
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  157. @AP

    There is actually such a diaspora community. When I lived in Chicago I belonged to the Swedish American Club, which was a lot of fun (and provided a lot of dates).
     
    There was a nice pancake place in the old Swedish neighborhood, which has become Chicago's lesbian neighborhood (Ukrainian village has a bit of a hipster infestation, but the Ukrainians are holding on - advertising for rent only in the Ukrainian language is a great way of keeping a neighborhood intact without getting in trouble).

    I’m much more American in spirit than you are for instance. You obsess over the Ukraine in a way I do not about Sweden.
     
    TBH this is my solitary hobby; I don't play videogames or watch TV shows on my own. I devote a couple hours daily to it (I go to bed late) but my "work" here is not representative of daily life. Now a patient is filling out paperwork and completing surveys so I'm here.

    I had a circle of eastern European friends from various countries with whom we had often passionate political debates; most of us have gone our separate ways so this is a nice outlet for that sort of thing. As you wrote, the internet is great for such things.

    I didn’t mean that as a critique, despite my irritation over small states with marginal cultures. Simply a matter of fact.

    If you stick with this country your children will be as American as I am.

    And in this comment section we’re building the Reptile Ragnarok. I am more impressed with you people than I have been anywhere else on the internet (in this political culture).

    Read More
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  158. @utu
    This map should be used to teach people about what are the foundations of conservative and liberal sentiments. It all comes down to the connection to soil. The Poles in the western Poland lost that connection. They got uprooted. This changed their outlook.

    Bolsheviks new exactly what they were doing when the decided to exterminate kulaks. People with connection to land which thew owned could not be turned into a New Man. They would not buy indoctrination into some abstract notions.

    Capitalists and liberals love immigrants for exactly the same reason. Uprooted people can be indoctrinated and 'modernized.'

    To be modern means to be uprooted w/o a connection to the soil. Jews were always the vanguard of modernity. Modernity is Jewish. The question one should ask who ends up owning all the land in the end.

    I am not a farmer.

    But I feel a great connection to my home.

    It is my dream to return and raise a family there.

    Whenever I pass through I make a point of driving past my childhood home.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Is the bottom house on Lake Michigan? There is a great public but unmarked beach there, no lifeguards to prevent deep swimming out into the lake.
    , @Highlander
    Jesus! How many kids do you intend to have?
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  159. AP says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    I am not a farmer.

    But I feel a great connection to my home.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8d/Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG/1200px-Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG

    http://data2.finalsite.com/cf82/lakeforestschoolsorg/data/media/fullsize/1652.jpg?v=102516011440

    It is my dream to return and raise a family there.

    Whenever I pass through I make a point of driving past my childhood home.

    Is the bottom house on Lake Michigan? There is a great public but unmarked beach there, no lifeguards to prevent deep swimming out into the lake.

    Read More
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  160. Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    I wouldn't miss him. This whole image of him as some kind of benevolent reformer is totally fake anyway.
    , @Randal
    First I've heard of that, but I was away in the wilds of Scotland for a week until last weekend, and haven't really caught up.

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn't sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed - the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo. More likely he was wounded and his loyalists are keeping a lid on it while he recovers.

    Of course, he might not recover if the wounds are serious.....
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  161. @reiner Tor
    Has anyone heard of this?

    https://usa.spectator.co.uk/2018/06/will-the-real-mohammed-bin-salman-please-stand-up/

    I wouldn’t miss him. This whole image of him as some kind of benevolent reformer is totally fake anyway.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    No. But strange that he could be dead and our free media is the last one to find out. If true, then the Iranians reported it much earlier. If untrue, then there’s still a strange disappearance, which our free media is not reporting us.
    , @reiner Tor
    Another interesting story is the Malaysian minister announcing that they don’t agree that the JIT had any conclusive evidence about Russian culpability for the MH17. (This I know only from Mitleser’s comment yesterday.)

    Yesterday I shared it in a Facebook group. The commenters complained that there was no “mainstream” source. Actually, there was, but a quick online search resulted in only Asian and Russian (Sputnik, RT) sources. Interesting, eh?

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/no-conclusive-evidence-russia-behind-mh17-downing-malaysia-10290266
    , @songbird
    What is so curious to me about Saudi Arabia is why they don't ban marriages between first cousins. The leadership absolutely knows that it is bad - they've been told, and, I think, convinced, as they do offer free pre-marital genetic tests, for certain recessive diseases.

    But why do they not ban it, and, to mollify, just say you can still marry your second cousin? The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to - that is the only reason that makes sense to me. And, so the question is: how much reform can you do in a place where they are afraid to ban cousin marriage?

    I guess an alternative explanation would be the King wants stupid subjects, and I guess that is possible.
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  162. @German_reader
    I wouldn't miss him. This whole image of him as some kind of benevolent reformer is totally fake anyway.

    No. But strange that he could be dead and our free media is the last one to find out. If true, then the Iranians reported it much earlier. If untrue, then there’s still a strange disappearance, which our free media is not reporting us.

    Read More
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  163. Randal says:

    Fascinating series of posts by Craig Murray digging into the opinion management operations of a particular pro-war “anti-Semite witch”-finder on Wikipedia:

    The Philip Cross Affair

    Emma Barnett: A Classic “Philip Cross” Wikipedia Operation

    The “Philip Cross” MSM Promotion Operation Part 3 278

    Philip Cross Madness Part IV

    Credit as always to Craig Murray for having the persistence to pull on the thread until interesting things really start to get revealed.

    As an aside, though, it should be born in mind that Murray’s characterisation of “Philip Crioss” as being “right wing” is really just another example of the commonplace wishful thinking of anti-establishment leftwingers who refuse to admit that the establishment they rail against (legitimately in many cases) is overwhelmingly leftwing in every aspect except being supportive of indigenous working class interests. Every single one of the people he names as likely being behind these operations or supported by them would back every leftist social radicalism of the past few decades of political correctness, from anti-white “anti-racism” through promotion of the normalisation of homosexual activity to any mention of the problems caused by jewish lobby power, and every one of them would justify the wars and confrontations they promote by reference to a supposed need to make the world safe for feminism and homosexuality etc, from Afghanistan to Russia.

    These are Blairites, and Blairites are every bit as fundamentally of the left as you would expect from people who grew up as Trotskyists and similar and transitioned to the Labour Party in order to gain power and status. Only in their adherence to the late C20th unholy alliance of the establishment left with big business and the concomitant abandonment of the indigenous working classes have they departed from the longstanding program of the left to radically transform society.

    Read More
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  164. Randal says:
    @reiner Tor
    Has anyone heard of this?

    https://usa.spectator.co.uk/2018/06/will-the-real-mohammed-bin-salman-please-stand-up/

    First I’ve heard of that, but I was away in the wilds of Scotland for a week until last weekend, and haven’t really caught up.

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn’t sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed – the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo. More likely he was wounded and his loyalists are keeping a lid on it while he recovers.

    Of course, he might not recover if the wounds are serious…..

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Yes, very likely.
    , @Mitleser

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn’t sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed – the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo.
     
    If they were successful and want to avoid a succession fight, it would make sense to cover up his death.
    At least for awhile.
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  165. @German_reader
    I wouldn't miss him. This whole image of him as some kind of benevolent reformer is totally fake anyway.

    Another interesting story is the Malaysian minister announcing that they don’t agree that the JIT had any conclusive evidence about Russian culpability for the MH17. (This I know only from Mitleser’s comment yesterday.)

    Yesterday I shared it in a Facebook group. The commenters complained that there was no “mainstream” source. Actually, there was, but a quick online search resulted in only Asian and Russian (Sputnik, RT) sources. Interesting, eh?

    https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/no-conclusive-evidence-russia-behind-mh17-downing-malaysia-10290266

    Read More
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  166. @Randal
    First I've heard of that, but I was away in the wilds of Scotland for a week until last weekend, and haven't really caught up.

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn't sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed - the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo. More likely he was wounded and his loyalists are keeping a lid on it while he recovers.

    Of course, he might not recover if the wounds are serious.....

    Yes, very likely.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    You might find this just posted comment interesting, from longtime Sic Semper Tyrannis commenter FB Ali:

    http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/2018/06/were-taking-names-.html#disqus_thread

    FB Ali • 37 minutes ago

    Re Saudi Arabia: I have previously referred to reports regarding the death
    of the Saudi Crown Prince, MbS, as a result of the AQ attack on his palace on
    April 21. Now, pictures are circulating of his funeral.

    There is so far no official announcement, but that means nothing.

    My own hunch is that these reports may well be true. How long can the
    Saudis (and the Western media) conceal what has happened?
     
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  167. Randal says:
    @reiner Tor
    Yes, very likely.

    You might find this just posted comment interesting, from longtime Sic Semper Tyrannis commenter FB Ali:

    http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/2018/06/were-taking-names-.html#disqus_thread

    FB Ali • 37 minutes ago

    Re Saudi Arabia: I have previously referred to reports regarding the death
    of the Saudi Crown Prince, MbS, as a result of the AQ attack on his palace on
    April 21. Now, pictures are circulating of his funeral.

    There is so far no official announcement, but that means nothing.

    My own hunch is that these reports may well be true. How long can the
    Saudis (and the Western media) conceal what has happened?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The king was very active today and appointed the crown prince to head some new useless committee.

    http://saudigazette.com.sa/article/536078/SAUDI-ARABIA/King-Salman-issues-several-royal-orders
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  168. Mitleser says:
    @Randal
    First I've heard of that, but I was away in the wilds of Scotland for a week until last weekend, and haven't really caught up.

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn't sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed - the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo. More likely he was wounded and his loyalists are keeping a lid on it while he recovers.

    Of course, he might not recover if the wounds are serious.....

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn’t sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed – the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo.

    If they were successful and want to avoid a succession fight, it would make sense to cover up his death.
    At least for awhile.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    That's true, but keeping it quiet (or at any rate out of western establishment media) for over a month seems a big ask unless there is an expectation he will eventually be able to return to the public eye and refute all these rumours. Although it's true that it would be easier given he's the "power behind the throne" and not the titular head.

    Though that would not really be a coup as such but rather just an assassination of a powerful figure in the regime, with the monarchy continuing in power but under different guidance.
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  169. Mitleser says:

    China, the next drone superpower

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PhHxPJSrPOw
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  170. Randal says:
    @Mitleser

    Taking that story at face value, though, it doesn’t sound plausible as a successful coup, because if it had succeeded most likely the winners would have let us know by now. Same if he had been killed – the succession fight would have broken out immediately and probably very publicly imo.
     
    If they were successful and want to avoid a succession fight, it would make sense to cover up his death.
    At least for awhile.

    That’s true, but keeping it quiet (or at any rate out of western establishment media) for over a month seems a big ask unless there is an expectation he will eventually be able to return to the public eye and refute all these rumours. Although it’s true that it would be easier given he’s the “power behind the throne” and not the titular head.

    Though that would not really be a coup as such but rather just an assassination of a powerful figure in the regime, with the monarchy continuing in power but under different guidance.

    Read More
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  171. utu says:
    @Mitleser
    China, the next drone superpower

    http://static.atimes.com/uploads/2017/12/00300232266_f2c54a52.gif
    https://youtu.be/5LdaWMNKUHs
    https://youtu.be/5upRXXnPfvY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4ns97i65ic

    Read More
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  172. I hope I didn’t read it here.

    So India just agreed to buy S-400 Triumf systems. However, since April, Rozoboronexport, the Russian weapons exports company, falls under the very same sanctions as Rusal. This means that theoretically India itself would fall under the extraterritorial sanctions.

    Anyway, the Americans are pressuring India not to sign the deal, but it seems likely that they will sign it anyway. It’s possible that they will grant some kind of exemption to India. But it’s possible that the proposed sale of Predator drones or fighter jets might be canceled.

    I think this is good news, especially because the Indians are probably angry that the Americans are trying to tell them where they are supposed to buy their weapons.

    Though no one mentions it, I guess it might be possible that Indians will get back to the Su-57 development..?

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-to-go-ahead-with-s-400-defence-deal-with-russia/story-BgOK3oEBHkRTaW6WKMDA4J.html

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/s-400-deal-with-russia-to-complicate-india-us-interoperability-congressman/story-VPOIHKkt6LSjbflbeH7vTK.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William

    Though no one mentions it, I guess it might be possible that Indians will get back to the Su-57 development..?
     
    No way. The Indians have learned the hard way that co-developing weapons with the Russians doesn't work. The Russians refuse to share their tech, they miss deadlines and they charge way too much.
    , @Randal
    Well if you think that's potentially a ludicrous over-reaction try this report from Le Monde per South Front:

    Saudi Arabia Will Take “Military Action” Against Qatar If It Purchases Russian S-400 System – Report

    In a letter addressed to French President Emmanuel Macron, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud warned that Saudi Arabia will take a military action against Qatar if it acquires Russian-made S-400 long-range air-defense systems, the French newspaper Le Monde reported on June 1.

    The Kingdom [Saudi Arabia] would be ready to take all necessary measures to eliminate this defense system, including military action,” King Salman warned in the latter.
     
    Everyone seems to be getting excited about Russian-built AD systems these days.
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  173. @Randal
    You might find this just posted comment interesting, from longtime Sic Semper Tyrannis commenter FB Ali:

    http://turcopolier.typepad.com/sic_semper_tyrannis/2018/06/were-taking-names-.html#disqus_thread

    FB Ali • 37 minutes ago

    Re Saudi Arabia: I have previously referred to reports regarding the death
    of the Saudi Crown Prince, MbS, as a result of the AQ attack on his palace on
    April 21. Now, pictures are circulating of his funeral.

    There is so far no official announcement, but that means nothing.

    My own hunch is that these reports may well be true. How long can the
    Saudis (and the Western media) conceal what has happened?
     

    The king was very active today and appointed the crown prince to head some new useless committee.

    http://saudigazette.com.sa/article/536078/SAUDI-ARABIA/King-Salman-issues-several-royal-orders

    Read More
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  174. DFH says:
    @reiner Tor
    Regarding Jobbik. They are currently slightly to the left of Fidesz for most practical purposes.

    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.

    The school mentioned above taught anti-science views (I think they rejected the theory of evolution, for example - it might endear them to some commenters but not to others), and while I’m unsure about the school itself, but some of the Vona supporters or moderates continue to be extremists when it comes to the idiotic we wuz kangs (we wuz Sumerians, we wuz Jesus Christ, etc.) strain of Hungarian nationalism, which came into being after the war in the emigration, and possibly was a diversion created or cultivated by the communist intelligence services, but which definitely took on a life of its own.

    As to their alliance with the leftists. Since 2014 they have been doing that in by-elections (but not in the general election), and they openly stated the possibility of an electoral agreement with one of the leftist parties, LMP, which was founded only in 2009, and which until the election explicitly rejected any cooperation with the other leftist parties (whose main forces are the former communist socialists and a spinoff of the socialists, therefore implicated in both pre-1990 communism and the horrible 2002-10 leftist government), and they had been better on most questions than the other leftist parties. I think it might have been possible to form a coalition with them where they accept strict immigration enforcement etc. in exchange for some minor concessions. However, since their former leader resigned in 2016, they seem to be drifting leftwards, so probably they will now just join the rest of the leftist parties. I don’t know if Jobbik will ever consider joining up with these, or what will happen.

    It must be noted that Fidesz tried really hard to push them to the left, probably because after moderating their image, they seemed to be more dangerous than the socialists. So they gave them an extreme fine for doing something which Fidesz also did. (All opposition parties received fines, except smaller. Fidesz didn’t receive, because - you want believe it - the authorities only audited the opposition parties, they explained that they were not chosen randomly.)

    Jobbik now has no money (because of the extreme fine) to run a candidate in the by-election, so they decided to just support it. Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.

    Yet more evidence that Evola, Spengler and their ilk should be vigorously purged from nationalist thought

    Read More
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  175. @reiner Tor
    I hope I didn’t read it here.

    So India just agreed to buy S-400 Triumf systems. However, since April, Rozoboronexport, the Russian weapons exports company, falls under the very same sanctions as Rusal. This means that theoretically India itself would fall under the extraterritorial sanctions.

    Anyway, the Americans are pressuring India not to sign the deal, but it seems likely that they will sign it anyway. It’s possible that they will grant some kind of exemption to India. But it’s possible that the proposed sale of Predator drones or fighter jets might be canceled.

    I think this is good news, especially because the Indians are probably angry that the Americans are trying to tell them where they are supposed to buy their weapons.

    Though no one mentions it, I guess it might be possible that Indians will get back to the Su-57 development..?

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-to-go-ahead-with-s-400-defence-deal-with-russia/story-BgOK3oEBHkRTaW6WKMDA4J.html

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/s-400-deal-with-russia-to-complicate-india-us-interoperability-congressman/story-VPOIHKkt6LSjbflbeH7vTK.html

    Though no one mentions it, I guess it might be possible that Indians will get back to the Su-57 development..?

    No way. The Indians have learned the hard way that co-developing weapons with the Russians doesn’t work. The Russians refuse to share their tech, they miss deadlines and they charge way too much.

    Read More
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  176. Randal says:
    @reiner Tor
    I hope I didn’t read it here.

    So India just agreed to buy S-400 Triumf systems. However, since April, Rozoboronexport, the Russian weapons exports company, falls under the very same sanctions as Rusal. This means that theoretically India itself would fall under the extraterritorial sanctions.

    Anyway, the Americans are pressuring India not to sign the deal, but it seems likely that they will sign it anyway. It’s possible that they will grant some kind of exemption to India. But it’s possible that the proposed sale of Predator drones or fighter jets might be canceled.

    I think this is good news, especially because the Indians are probably angry that the Americans are trying to tell them where they are supposed to buy their weapons.

    Though no one mentions it, I guess it might be possible that Indians will get back to the Su-57 development..?

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/india-to-go-ahead-with-s-400-defence-deal-with-russia/story-BgOK3oEBHkRTaW6WKMDA4J.html

    https://m.hindustantimes.com/india-news/s-400-deal-with-russia-to-complicate-india-us-interoperability-congressman/story-VPOIHKkt6LSjbflbeH7vTK.html

    Well if you think that’s potentially a ludicrous over-reaction try this report from Le Monde per South Front:

    Saudi Arabia Will Take “Military Action” Against Qatar If It Purchases Russian S-400 System – Report

    In a letter addressed to French President Emmanuel Macron, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud warned that Saudi Arabia will take a military action against Qatar if it acquires Russian-made S-400 long-range air-defense systems, the French newspaper Le Monde reported on June 1.

    The Kingdom [Saudi Arabia] would be ready to take all necessary measures to eliminate this defense system, including military action,” King Salman warned in the latter.

    Everyone seems to be getting excited about Russian-built AD systems these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William

    Everyone seems to be getting excited about Russian-built AD systems these days.
     
    Don't you just want to see them in action? Tell your Lebanese and Syrians to attack Israel so we can see what the S-300 and S-400 can do.
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  177. @AP
    So does Ukraine:

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/ukraine/rakhiv/attractions/geographical-centre-of-europe/a/poi-sig/1383331/360939

    So does Ukraine

    A map with various “centres”,

    as well an interesting article setting out some of the history of the issue:

    http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/498-monumental-drift-europes-many-midpoints

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  178. @Randal
    Well if you think that's potentially a ludicrous over-reaction try this report from Le Monde per South Front:

    Saudi Arabia Will Take “Military Action” Against Qatar If It Purchases Russian S-400 System – Report

    In a letter addressed to French President Emmanuel Macron, Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud warned that Saudi Arabia will take a military action against Qatar if it acquires Russian-made S-400 long-range air-defense systems, the French newspaper Le Monde reported on June 1.

    The Kingdom [Saudi Arabia] would be ready to take all necessary measures to eliminate this defense system, including military action,” King Salman warned in the latter.
     
    Everyone seems to be getting excited about Russian-built AD systems these days.

    Everyone seems to be getting excited about Russian-built AD systems these days.

    Don’t you just want to see them in action? Tell your Lebanese and Syrians to attack Israel so we can see what the S-300 and S-400 can do.

    Read More
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  179. Today is the general election of Slovenia. Slovenia has been a ‘model nation’ in the eyes of the eurocrats, which is why it is interesting that the guy leading the polls – Janez Janša – has been moving from the center-right to the populist-nationalist right. He’s been remolding himself in the image of Orban and ALDE – the liberal grouping in the EU parliament – has even accused him of taking money from Orban-connected businessmen. Politico.eu, which is the house organ of the pro-EU liberal establishment, has been running scare stories about “buhuu Slovenia is turning illiberal!!”.

    There’s a good general thread over at /r/Europe that will be updated throughout the day:

    https://old.reddit.com/r/europe/comments/8o1wvj/slovenian_parliamentary_elections_megathread/

    The most likely outcome is somekind of hung parliament, but getting the center-right in Slovenia to stop being like CDU in Germany and more like Fidesz in Hungary is a very good thing. It would allow for more space for similar movements in Croatia.

    Overall, I’m very impressed by Orban and Hungary. They are doing very good work in their neighbourhood.

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  180. @AP

    It’s because America has an imported population of Africans and Mexicans, nothing more.
    Not sure about the Mexican part.
     
    They impact educational statistics.

    Furthermore, even the racial gap between blacks and whites is decreasing
     
    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it's about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.

    :::::::::::::

    In general, across all stats (crime, education, health) Americans of Europrn descent are within the range of people in Europe. America only looks "worse" when its large third-worldish population is added to produce a misleading overall "average."

    They impact educational statistics.

    Well, sure, but my contention was about health ;)

    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.

    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income. Even poorer countries like Spain or Italy do better.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized. Angus Deaton, who won a Nobel prize a few years ago, has been mostly focused on poor developing countries like India for much of his career but suddenly turned his gaze to the US and he made this observation few had done before. It’s actually shocking that this demographic is now on par with their Russian equivalents in the 1990s, despite living in a much wealthier country with far lower unemployment. And then there’s the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many ‘flyover’ places.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse. And as I pointed out, Latinos and Asians actually have higher life expectancy than US whites, while the gap with blacks is decreasing. Oh, and life expenctacy fell last year. I don’t think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data. The US is not falling apart by any means, but given its sky-high per capita income, the fact that it spends a far greater share of its GDP on health than any other industrialised country, I do think it is fair to say it is underperforming. And I don’t really buy that it is all due to non-whites. As I said: the data doesn’t show that.

    In terms of education, economics, that’s a different point entirely.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    "They impact educational statistics."

    Well, sure, but my contention was about health
     
    Point taken.

    "Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic."

    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income.
     
    It's also not as healthy. Being richer means more people have cars and drive, rather than walk. They eat more processed foods and can afford it. Obesity leads to poor health.

    I was looking at houses with a friend living in flyover country, in an expensive (average price about $750,000) subdivision. I saw an overweight family decided to visit someone a block away by riding in a golf cart rather than walking. So a lot of it is lifestyle, not an inferior healthcare system. And again, blacks do bring the averages down.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized
     
    A good point. What is the rate for these people? Suicide rates of all American whites is about 17/100,000:

    https://www.sprc.org/racial-ethnic-disparities

    This is high, but within the range, of European countries (Lithuanian 26.1, Belarus 19, Poland 18.5, Russia 17.9, Ukraine 16.6, Ireland 11.1).

    And then there’s the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many ‘flyover’ places.
     
    Also many deaths. I've seen this.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse.
     
    Largely a myth, once you take into account the population and lifestyle. Also America is much more generous with its interventions. People would be excluded from certain procedures in Europe because it isn't cost effective to treat them (if they are too overweight, or have other chronic conditions, or are too old, etc.) are often treated anyways in the USA.. Result is high cost and worse outcome. But if it is your overweight grandma who can have a chance with the procedure, wouldn't you want to go for it?

    I don’t think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data
     
    Sure, once one excludes other variables. A good way of comparing apples to apples is to focus on mostly European-settled states such as Vermont or Minnesota. Minnesota has better outcomes than Manitoba in next-door Canada, with its supposedly superior system. Vermont better than New Brunswick. Okay, West Virginia doesn't do well.
    , @Ali Choudhury
    The extra spending is because private insurance companies are not allowed to compete across state lines, so allied with state legislators they build themselves comfortable oligopolies and charge what they feel like.
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  181. AP says:
    @Polish Perspective

    They impact educational statistics.
     
    Well, sure, but my contention was about health ;)

    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.
     
    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income. Even poorer countries like Spain or Italy do better.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized. Angus Deaton, who won a Nobel prize a few years ago, has been mostly focused on poor developing countries like India for much of his career but suddenly turned his gaze to the US and he made this observation few had done before. It's actually shocking that this demographic is now on par with their Russian equivalents in the 1990s, despite living in a much wealthier country with far lower unemployment. And then there's the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many 'flyover' places.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse. And as I pointed out, Latinos and Asians actually have higher life expectancy than US whites, while the gap with blacks is decreasing. Oh, and life expenctacy fell last year. I don't think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data. The US is not falling apart by any means, but given its sky-high per capita income, the fact that it spends a far greater share of its GDP on health than any other industrialised country, I do think it is fair to say it is underperforming. And I don't really buy that it is all due to non-whites. As I said: the data doesn't show that.

    In terms of education, economics, that's a different point entirely.

    “They impact educational statistics.”

    Well, sure, but my contention was about health

    Point taken.

    “Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.”

    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income.

    It’s also not as healthy. Being richer means more people have cars and drive, rather than walk. They eat more processed foods and can afford it. Obesity leads to poor health.

    I was looking at houses with a friend living in flyover country, in an expensive (average price about $750,000) subdivision. I saw an overweight family decided to visit someone a block away by riding in a golf cart rather than walking. So a lot of it is lifestyle, not an inferior healthcare system. And again, blacks do bring the averages down.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized

    A good point. What is the rate for these people? Suicide rates of all American whites is about 17/100,000:

    https://www.sprc.org/racial-ethnic-disparities

    This is high, but within the range, of European countries (Lithuanian 26.1, Belarus 19, Poland 18.5, Russia 17.9, Ukraine 16.6, Ireland 11.1).

    And then there’s the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many ‘flyover’ places.

    Also many deaths. I’ve seen this.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse.

    Largely a myth, once you take into account the population and lifestyle. Also America is much more generous with its interventions. People would be excluded from certain procedures in Europe because it isn’t cost effective to treat them (if they are too overweight, or have other chronic conditions, or are too old, etc.) are often treated anyways in the USA.. Result is high cost and worse outcome. But if it is your overweight grandma who can have a chance with the procedure, wouldn’t you want to go for it?

    I don’t think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data

    Sure, once one excludes other variables. A good way of comparing apples to apples is to focus on mostly European-settled states such as Vermont or Minnesota. Minnesota has better outcomes than Manitoba in next-door Canada, with its supposedly superior system. Vermont better than New Brunswick. Okay, West Virginia doesn’t do well.

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  182. Highlander says: • Website
    @Thorfinnsson
    I am not a farmer.

    But I feel a great connection to my home.

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8d/Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG/1200px-Lake_Forest_City_Hall.JPG

    http://data2.finalsite.com/cf82/lakeforestschoolsorg/data/media/fullsize/1652.jpg?v=102516011440

    It is my dream to return and raise a family there.

    Whenever I pass through I make a point of driving past my childhood home.

    Jesus! How many kids do you intend to have?

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  183. @Greasy William
    I'm writing a screenplay about Noah's flood, except the movie is from the perspective of a family that isn't on the Ark.

    Assuming that the film is well written (which it will be since I'm the one writing it) is that a movie that any of you would be interested in seeing?

    I have a friend who is a writer in Hollywood and he was super negative about the idea when I pitched it to him. He said no Hollywood studio would ever touch it. He added that the only market for such a film would be Evangelical Christians but that they would never allow their children to see a movie that humanized the flood's victims so they are out as potential ticket buyers as well. He basically thought that it was a film with no audience.

    Whatever. I think that if you make a good movie with an original plot people will want to see it.

    Does it have Taylor Swift?

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  184. The /pol/ thread on the Slovenian election is very interesting. Some examples:

    First, a Hungarian on the feasibility of intermarium:

    (click to enlarge)

    And then a Czech-bro weighs in on why Piłsudski’s idea in the 1920s fell through, from the Czech perspective

    (click to enlarge)

    There’s also lots of Slovenes talking about the political situation from a right-wing PoV, which is something you almost never read about in the MSM (which largely ignores Slovenia as things stand, and whenever it writes about them, only does so through a neoliberal establishment prism).

    boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/173888241

    Update: seems the thread got very popular. So it got archived(max replies reached). Still tons of great discussions in the old one worth reading. New thread here:

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/173894290#p173894290

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  185. @Polish Perspective

    They impact educational statistics.
     
    Well, sure, but my contention was about health ;)

    Correct. But if you look at the stats for whites overall, it’s about the same as for people in Europe. The US white life expectancy of 79 is a bit higher than Czech Republic.
     
    Yes, but the US is a much richer country. It should be at the same level of the Nordic countries given its high per capita income. Even poorer countries like Spain or Italy do better.

    Also, my point about middle-aged whites with a high school degree having very high suicide rates deserves to be re-emphasized. Angus Deaton, who won a Nobel prize a few years ago, has been mostly focused on poor developing countries like India for much of his career but suddenly turned his gaze to the US and he made this observation few had done before. It's actually shocking that this demographic is now on par with their Russian equivalents in the 1990s, despite living in a much wealthier country with far lower unemployment. And then there's the opiod crisis among the young, which is not leading to mass deaths but to mass addiction in many 'flyover' places.

    On top of that, the US spends a much greater percentage of its GDP on health care yet its outcomes are either as good, or worse. And as I pointed out, Latinos and Asians actually have higher life expectancy than US whites, while the gap with blacks is decreasing. Oh, and life expenctacy fell last year. I don't think everything is as sanguine as you believe, certainly not if you look at the actual data. The US is not falling apart by any means, but given its sky-high per capita income, the fact that it spends a far greater share of its GDP on health than any other industrialised country, I do think it is fair to say it is underperforming. And I don't really buy that it is all due to non-whites. As I said: the data doesn't show that.

    In terms of education, economics, that's a different point entirely.

    The extra spending is because private insurance companies are not allowed to compete across state lines, so allied with state legislators they build themselves comfortable oligopolies and charge what they feel like.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    Some states are larger in populations than many European countries so your argument about across the state line competition does not work. States could negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies but they are prohibited form doing so by federal laws. The health insurance system in the US as it is because the System wants it to be like that. So far no serious effort was made to break the system because there is not enough law maker who are not on the take from pharmaceutical and insurance companies.
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  186. Dmitry says:
    @AP
    So does Ukraine:

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/ukraine/rakhiv/attractions/geographical-centre-of-europe/a/poi-sig/1383331/360939

    AP have you been in these village?

    https://uzh-city.livejournal.com/10789.html

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    • Replies: @AP
    No, I haven't been to that oblast. It is one of the poorest ones in Ukraine so I suspect that this village is not typical. However Lviv outskirts look a but similar.
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  187. songbird says:
    @Mitleser

    Polish statehood has historically oriented itself towards the East, and there’s always been an element of opportunism in how identity was construed.

    For instance, Polish elites were fond of making up bullshit stories about how Poles are supposedly “sarmatians” and often used to LARP as Ottomans in their dress code when the Ottoman Empire was strong. Now, we’re supposedly these ‘Central Europeans’. It’s all rather bullshit to me.
     

    https://i.imgur.com/LYsBIyI.png

    Barbarian man of Poland [Boluniya] in the Great Western Ocean, and his barbarian wife + random bear
     

    This country is east of Germany. Because the area is frigid, its inhabitants all wear coats of fox pelt even into early summer. The Poles like sword-fighting, and they also train bears in their houses and make them perform tricks. The women are in charge of all household affairs. Their laws are harsh both within and abroad. This country produces amber.
     
    https://www.reddit.com/r/China/comments/7wrgvs/18thcentury_chinese_drawing_of_a_swiss_mercenary/du2mb2c/

    Bear Poland could be described as Eastern, but Poland was moved westwards in the last century, hence Central Europeans is the correct term for the new Poles.

    Quite a tangent – but I have always been a fan of the Berlin Bear and the other heraldic symbols and flags of German cities. I know that a lot of people don’t like the current flag of Germany – but it is my hope that Germans will someday rally locally along these great, old feudalistic symbols.

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  188. songbird says:
    @Mitleser
    Lithuania? Never! Germany is center.

    GADHEIM, POPULATION 89, IS A quiet village surrounded by farms in central Germany’s wine country. It may be just a small dot on the map, but Gadheim is about to be a symbolically important dot. When Brexit is finalized in 2019, the town will be the new geographic center of the European Union.

    The exact coordinates of the new center of Europe lead to a field of rapeseed owned by Karin Kessler. An EU flag will soon fly there to mark the spot, but Kessler has mixed feelings about the designation. “The fact that it’s only happening because of this Brexit is a bit of a shame for me,” she told German news site The Local.

    The geographic center of the EU shifts each time a country joins or leaves. The current center is in Westerngrund, about 37 miles northwest of Gadheim, but it has only held the title since 2013, when Croatia joined the coalition. Before that, the inclusion of Bulgaria and Romania put the center in Meerholz, Germany. If Scotland votes to withdraw from the United Kingdom and independently rejoin the EU, the geographic center will move (slightly) once again, back toward Westerngrund.
     
    https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/geographic-center-european-union-brexit

    But we must calculate based on Juncker’s future plans: what will be the center when Turkey and all the MENA countries are added?

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  189. utu says:
    @Ali Choudhury
    The extra spending is because private insurance companies are not allowed to compete across state lines, so allied with state legislators they build themselves comfortable oligopolies and charge what they feel like.

    Some states are larger in populations than many European countries so your argument about across the state line competition does not work. States could negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies but they are prohibited form doing so by federal laws. The health insurance system in the US as it is because the System wants it to be like that. So far no serious effort was made to break the system because there is not enough law maker who are not on the take from pharmaceutical and insurance companies.

    Read More
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  190. songbird says:
    @Polish Perspective

    Snarky European nationalists who bash us are jerks. They should have some sympathy instead. We’re a prototype for what the The Enemy is trying to do to them.
     
    They do it to themselves, too. I noticed this strain of smugness in Denmark, even if Denmark is just Sweden T-minus 20 years. It's all very narrow-minded and idiotic, but I can't say that Polish nationalists are any better. My 'debate' with Another Polish Perspective showed as much. Many still live in a fantasy world where Poland will just magically skate by and be largely untouched.

    As they say: we either hang in there together or we'll be hanged separately.

    Many still live in a fantasy world where Poland will just magically skate by and be largely untouched.

    Germany is the strategic heart of Europe – that is why I am very much concerned over Germany, even above other parts of Europe. I’m not saying Arabs and blacks have good militarily skills or anything, but it will make things much more difficult if it is lost – no part of Western Europe will be safe, especially given the complicated demographic situation in other countries. Meanwhile, they would control any entrance into the Baltic Sea.

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  191. songbird says:
    @Mitleser
    So many (poor) Nigerians, wat do?

    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1002882522647105537

    https://twitter.com/adam_tooze/status/1002897620421898240

    If you ever want to redpill someone on race – someone who is reachable – first make all the arguments: scientific, observation, and theory – and then finally hand them a book on worldwide development. Preferably, one with a Leftist or PC author, since the question of regional differences will need to be addressed, and the excuses given for Africa will be side-splittingly funny and transparently stupid.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Next step: Use the respected classics?

    https://twitter.com/mostqualmishly/status/1003070751782719488
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  192. songbird says:
    @reiner Tor
    The way I see it, nothing wrong with Nigeria that a few millennia of evolution couldn’t cure.

    They would probably need to live in a different environment though – perhaps South Africa or Lesotho would be enough. Assuming total isolation of Africa.

    Probably about the most un-PC thought you could have: HIV could lead to rapid African evolution, if we stop sending the pills.

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  193. utu says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Thank you for the native account.


    The former leader Vona started an Evola-esque traditionalist academy (nominally totally independent of the party) for select party cadres and sympathizers (it closed some three years ago, apparently it cost too much), and apparently he is (was?) fond of traditionalism (especially Evola and a few Hungarian thinkers like Béla Hamvas), so we cannot fully know how genuine this leftward turn is. You have to remember that all these moderates were extremists just four years ago. It’s possible that they are just faking it in the hope of getting to the corridors of power.
     
    That's the part which I still struggle with, if they weren't genuine far-right, how come nobody caught them. Or if they were - and presumably still are - then I fail to see the 4D chess here.

    It seems the most banal explanation is also the most likely: they never had any real principles and just went for whatever the most expedient position was possible at the time. Though your point about Vona setting up a traditionalist academy seems to fly in the face of that thesis.

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly. It's definitely an issue that I will track over the years, maybe there will be a book by some of the insiders. I am still holding out for the June 23rd platform fight for Jobbik. It seems that the challenger has about half the party with him and at least that is something he could salvage.

    Fidesz is now using them for a “Socialists Are The Real Racists” deranged campaign. The district is in Budapest, normally pro-Fidesz, but with very weak support for Jobbik, so it matters very little.
     
    Depressing tactic even if the stakes are low. The most optimistic interpretation is that Fidesz doesn't really believe that BS but feels compelled to push it since it's (comparatively) liberal Budapest.

    Regarding LMP. They are nominally a green party, and they took it seriously, so they were anti-globalists and anti-TTIP etc. They weren’t that good news for the globalist masters, except that I’d expect them to cave in at the end, just as Tsipras did. Anyway, now they are about to split up with the majority just joining up with the socialists. It’s somewhat surprising, because in 2013 they already had a split with a minority of them joining the socialists and leaving the party. But apparently now those who stayed have no better idea either.
     
    Hopefully they could evolve to play the same role that M5S plays in Italy. There is certainly common currency between right and left on stuff like globalisation, free trade, neoliberal economics etc. M5S is deeply split on the issue of migration (and similar identity issues), though I am too lacking in knowledge of the Hungarian left to make any judgement on those guys. It was my impression that much of the Hungarian left are some of the worst shitlibs imaginable (some were even outright calling for tearing down the border fence, IIRC). Is there space for a pragmatic left? From your words, it seems the mainstream socialists are just eating them all up. Are there factions within the socialists who would possibly emulate the stance of M5S?

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly.

    What if the little political parties are a synthetic creation? The operator in charge of them can unfold them and fold them at will. There is a room for spontaneity but most of the dancing these parties do is controlled. Somebody else is in charge of music and tunes. Assuming for a moment that indeed the political landscape in various countries is under complete control one question must be asked: To what advantage Orban was allowed to operate and succeed?

    I would consider a possibility that Orban’s Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America’s Deep State with strong links to Israel. Somebody is holding a protective umbrella over these two countries. Orban can afford getting rid of Soros w/o being condemned and destroy with accusations of nationalism and anti-semitism. It is harder to understand recent attacks on Poland by Holocaust Industry because it can undermine Polish commitment to America.

    Poland and Hungary are there to keep Germany from gaining too much power. The whole anti-Russia hoopla masks the true purpose of this policy which is anti-German. Poland’s Russophobia is kindled to keep Russia away from Germany. The Intermarium is a trick conjured by Trump while in Poland for consumption of Poles and V4. The incentive is letting V4 countries to have their sovereign immigration police at the expense of complete subjugation to American foreign policy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    I would consider a possibility that Orban’s Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America’s Deep State with strong links to Israel.
     
    But you've got zero proof for that, and it seems very unlikely to me. Orban and the Polish government are strongly demonized even in US media as far as I can tell.
    That being said, I think there might indeed be a risk of European anti-establishment movements letting themselves become coopted into the imperial projects of the Americans. When I read something like this
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/06/03/trumps-right-hand-man-in-europe-wants-to-empower-european-anti-establishment-conservatives/
    it certainly sets off my alarm bells. Grenell seems to have close contacts with John Bolton (he was his spokesman at the UN and seems to regard him as somewhat of a mentor) and also worked for Romney's campaign back in 2012 (before being removed because of his open homosexuality). That's not an "anti-establishment" background at all, it's the return of Bushism.
    So far he's criticized Germany for not taking part in airstrikes on Syria and has also demanded German companies should "immediately" leave Iran.
    Any European right-winger with self-respect should tell that presumptuous asshole and other Americans like him to take a hike.
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  194. songbird says:
    @German_reader
    I wouldn't miss him. This whole image of him as some kind of benevolent reformer is totally fake anyway.

    What is so curious to me about Saudi Arabia is why they don’t ban marriages between first cousins. The leadership absolutely knows that it is bad – they’ve been told, and, I think, convinced, as they do offer free pre-marital genetic tests, for certain recessive diseases.

    But why do they not ban it, and, to mollify, just say you can still marry your second cousin? The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to – that is the only reason that makes sense to me. And, so the question is: how much reform can you do in a place where they are afraid to ban cousin marriage?

    I guess an alternative explanation would be the King wants stupid subjects, and I guess that is possible.

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    • Replies: @German_reader

    The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to – that is the only reason that makes sense to me.
     
    Probably that. Wouldn't surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.
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  195. @utu

    To me, it just seems odd how one of the more impressive political parties in Europe folded so quickly.
     
    What if the little political parties are a synthetic creation? The operator in charge of them can unfold them and fold them at will. There is a room for spontaneity but most of the dancing these parties do is controlled. Somebody else is in charge of music and tunes. Assuming for a moment that indeed the political landscape in various countries is under complete control one question must be asked: To what advantage Orban was allowed to operate and succeed?

    I would consider a possibility that Orban's Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America's Deep State with strong links to Israel. Somebody is holding a protective umbrella over these two countries. Orban can afford getting rid of Soros w/o being condemned and destroy with accusations of nationalism and anti-semitism. It is harder to understand recent attacks on Poland by Holocaust Industry because it can undermine Polish commitment to America.

    Poland and Hungary are there to keep Germany from gaining too much power. The whole anti-Russia hoopla masks the true purpose of this policy which is anti-German. Poland's Russophobia is kindled to keep Russia away from Germany. The Intermarium is a trick conjured by Trump while in Poland for consumption of Poles and V4. The incentive is letting V4 countries to have their sovereign immigration police at the expense of complete subjugation to American foreign policy.

    I would consider a possibility that Orban’s Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America’s Deep State with strong links to Israel.

    But you’ve got zero proof for that, and it seems very unlikely to me. Orban and the Polish government are strongly demonized even in US media as far as I can tell.
    That being said, I think there might indeed be a risk of European anti-establishment movements letting themselves become coopted into the imperial projects of the Americans. When I read something like this

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/06/03/trumps-right-hand-man-in-europe-wants-to-empower-european-anti-establishment-conservatives/

    it certainly sets off my alarm bells. Grenell seems to have close contacts with John Bolton (he was his spokesman at the UN and seems to regard him as somewhat of a mentor) and also worked for Romney’s campaign back in 2012 (before being removed because of his open homosexuality). That’s not an “anti-establishment” background at all, it’s the return of Bushism.
    So far he’s criticized Germany for not taking part in airstrikes on Syria and has also demanded German companies should “immediately” leave Iran.
    Any European right-winger with self-respect should tell that presumptuous asshole and other Americans like him to take a hike.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    I wrote: 'I would consider a possibility...' to which you responded: 'But you’ve got zero proof for that, and it seems very unlikely to me.'

    Sleepwalkers walk down the stairs unconcerned because they haven't yet stumbled on some kind of proof that stairs may end. A part of inquiry is to make hypotheses and then to look for proofs not the other way around.

    But frankly for me it is more than just considering a possibility. I believe that all those attaches in embassies and NGO's and their agents of influence are doing something and thinking about things that haven't occurred to you or me.

    Grenell is just an overt manifestation of clumsy and heavy handed style of Trump administration. I argued a much stronger case than just a cooptation. I can image their fingers in the creation of these movements. I consider a possibility that nurturing anti-EU (which means anti-German) and anti-Muslim sentiments among European New Right in Europe will inevitably result in pro-Israel and pro-American stance of these factions providing that Russia will be made not attractive for the Nw Right which is being accomplished by the campaign of full spectrum Russia's vilification. Hungary and Czechia try to be much more sensible in the act of balancing than Poland which is the most extreme in its anti Russia stance.
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  196. @songbird
    What is so curious to me about Saudi Arabia is why they don't ban marriages between first cousins. The leadership absolutely knows that it is bad - they've been told, and, I think, convinced, as they do offer free pre-marital genetic tests, for certain recessive diseases.

    But why do they not ban it, and, to mollify, just say you can still marry your second cousin? The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to - that is the only reason that makes sense to me. And, so the question is: how much reform can you do in a place where they are afraid to ban cousin marriage?

    I guess an alternative explanation would be the King wants stupid subjects, and I guess that is possible.

    The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to – that is the only reason that makes sense to me.

    Probably that. Wouldn’t surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird

    Wouldn’t surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.
     
    I've always wondered what the Vegas odds are for things like this. Basically, what the market is saying about things the market doesn't talk about, except perhaps in really obfuscated, nebulous ways. For my model of Saudi Arabia, I'd look to Iran and the Shah, except I think Saudi Arabia is probably easier to control from the top down, because of its more arid geography and smaller population. Age pyramid seems to be different too, not as lopsided, compared to revolutionary Iran. The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system to help him keep power too. What complicates things is there are millions of foreign nationals in Saudi Arabia.
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  197. Mitleser says:

    Must read if you are interested in European politics (focus on German, French and to a lesser degree Italian politics): https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2018/05/europe-under-merkel-iv-balance-of-impotence/

    Why Germans are dangerous cucks and Poles and others should be worried.

    German national politics is a crucial factor in the politics of Europe, just as Europe is a powerful domestic presence in Germany. The “permissive consensus” that for several decades allowed European integration to proceed unimpeded was stronger in Germany than elsewhere, except perhaps in Italy.6 Up to today, “Europe”7 carries something like a sacred aura in Germany, too elevated to be linked to dirty concepts like national interest. The main strongholds of German Europeanism are the educated middle classes and the young generation, for whom Europe stands for all that is both virtuous and pleasant—from peace, human rights, tolerance, and “openness” to an international labor market and convenient travel across borders. Reflecting the difficulties of identifying with a German nation after 1945, German pro-European sentiment has long considered it self-evident that the EU is ultimately the vessel into which European nations can give up their separate states, identities, and interests. While other member states may have joined the EU to restore or preserve their national sovereignty,8 Germany is in the EU to get rid of it, firmly believing that this holds true for all others as well.

    This, of course, does not mean that German Europeanism was (and is) not interest-driven. Accession to the EEC in the 1950s was necessary for the reemergence of West Germany as a sovereign state. Moreover, guaranteed access to an ever-expanding, integrated European market was and is indispensable for the prosperity of Germany’s overindustrialized, export-heavy economy. Today, market access is assured by the common currency, which also artificially depresses the exchange rate for German industries exporting to the rest of the world.9 In German public consciousness, however, German material interests in “Europe” are overlaid by an image of the EU, including the EMU, as a “value community” (Wertegemeinschaft). This obfuscates the structural question of how Europe is, and should be, politically and economically organized: as a free-trade zone, a platform for cooperation among sovereign nation-states, an international organization devoted to the “globalization” of national economies, or a supranational superstate—and how in particular it is to be related to national democracy. Since any discussion of this question could undermine “Europe” as an integrative symbol—by waking sleeping dogs and laying bare the superficiality of a merely idealistic pro-European consensus—it is studiously avoided. Here Merkel’s unmatched capacity for content-free speech has been invaluable for preserving the interest-free “green” appearance of German Europeanism, which is so attractive to middle-class voters.

    One upshot is that, in Germany, national interests tend to be confused with general European interests.10 When other countries distinguish between the two, let alone give precedence to the former, Germans are honestly puzzled, and the distance from puzzlement to moral disapproval is short. In Germany, being less than enthusiastic about the EU’s “ever closer union of the peoples of Europe” (Treaty of Maastricht) is considered indicative of a moral deficit: witness the universal moral condemnation of the British decision to exit. Asserting national interests in the face of something as sacred as “the European idea” is regarded as a deplorable lapse into a discredited past. Meanwhile, German insistence on an integrated market in which no country is allowed to cheat against German industry by devaluing its currency is not seen as the defense of a national interest but as compliance with a moral imperative.

    It cannot be overemphasized how critical “Europe” and Germany are to Macron, including to his domestic politics. To express his sense of urgency, Macron scheduled a public speech on Europe for September 25, 2017, the day after the German election, obviously expecting that Merkel would be certain of another term by then. Whether the content of the speech, given to students at the Sorbonne, had been discussed with Merkel beforehand one cannot know; certainly, it was carefully crafted to suit German “pro-Europeanism” while hiding conflicts behind rhetoric decipherable, if at all, only to the initiated. In the speech, Macron more openly than before committed himself to the Modell Deutschland version of French Europeanism, based on a belief in the salutary effect German inspired economic reform would have on France. In this vision, German concessions would be secured not through a political alliance with other Mediterranean countries, forming a structural majority in a “democratized” eurozone (as envisaged by the French Left), but from restored German faith in French reformism. As a first confidence-building measure, Macron suggested that France and Germany renew the Treaty on German-French Cooperation, signed on January 22, 1963, by Konrad Adenauer and Charles de Gaulle, also known as the Elysée Treaty or (particularly in Germany) the FrenchGerman Friendship Treaty. This was enthusiastically received in Germany for its ceremonial and sentimental value. To fill the gap during the Merkel interregnum, the Bundestag staged a celebration of the Treaty’s fifty-fifth (!) anniversary in January 2018, with a speech by the president of the Assemblée nationale given, in flawless German, to a full house. Later that same day, a delegation of Bundestag members attended a parallel session in Paris, where Wolfgang Schäuble spoke as the Bundestag’s newly elected president. This time, however, the auditorium was almost empty, something the German media hid as best they could.

    :)

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    That's pretty perceptive, and useful since I don't think people outside Germany quite get how "Europe" is a quasi-religious project in German political discourse, with dissent marking you out as a morally deficient person, possibly a Nazi.
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  198. @Mitleser
    Must read if you are interested in European politics (focus on German, French and to a lesser degree Italian politics): https://americanaffairsjournal.org/2018/05/europe-under-merkel-iv-balance-of-impotence/

    Why Germans are dangerous cucks and Poles and others should be worried.

    German national politics is a crucial factor in the politics of Europe, just as Europe is a powerful domestic presence in Germany. The “permissive consensus” that for several decades allowed European integration to proceed unimpeded was stronger in Germany than elsewhere, except perhaps in Italy.6 Up to today, “Europe”7 carries something like a sacred aura in Germany, too elevated to be linked to dirty concepts like national interest. The main strongholds of German Europeanism are the educated middle classes and the young generation, for whom Europe stands for all that is both virtuous and pleasant—from peace, human rights, tolerance, and “openness” to an international labor market and convenient travel across borders. Reflecting the difficulties of identifying with a German nation after 1945, German pro-European sentiment has long considered it self-evident that the EU is ultimately the vessel into which European nations can give up their separate states, identities, and interests. While other member states may have joined the EU to restore or preserve their national sovereignty,8 Germany is in the EU to get rid of it, firmly believing that this holds true for all others as well.

    This, of course, does not mean that German Europeanism was (and is) not interest-driven. Accession to the EEC in the 1950s was necessary for the reemergence of West Germany as a sovereign state. Moreover, guaranteed access to an ever-expanding, integrated European market was and is indispensable for the prosperity of Germany’s overindustrialized, export-heavy economy. Today, market access is assured by the common currency, which also artificially depresses the exchange rate for German industries exporting to the rest of the world.9 In German public consciousness, however, German material interests in “Europe” are overlaid by an image of the EU, including the EMU, as a “value community” (Wertegemeinschaft). This obfuscates the structural question of how Europe is, and should be, politically and economically organized: as a free-trade zone, a platform for cooperation among sovereign nation-states, an international organization devoted to the “globalization” of national economies, or a supranational superstate—and how in particular it is to be related to national democracy. Since any discussion of this question could undermine “Europe” as an integrative symbol—by waking sleeping dogs and laying bare the superficiality of a merely idealistic pro-European consensus—it is studiously avoided. Here Merkel’s unmatched capacity for content-free speech has been invaluable for preserving the interest-free “green” appearance of German Europeanism, which is so attractive to middle-class voters.

    One upshot is that, in Germany, national interests tend to be confused with general European interests.10 When other countries distinguish between the two, let alone give precedence to the former, Germans are honestly puzzled, and the distance from puzzlement to moral disapproval is short. In Germany, being less than enthusiastic about the EU’s “ever closer union of the peoples of Europe” (Treaty of Maastricht) is considered indicative of a moral deficit: witness the universal moral condemnation of the British decision to exit. Asserting national interests in the face of something as sacred as “the European idea” is regarded as a deplorable lapse into a discredited past. Meanwhile, German insistence on an integrated market in which no country is allowed to cheat against German industry by devaluing its currency is not seen as the defense of a national interest but as compliance with a moral imperative.
     

    It cannot be overemphasized how critical “Europe” and Germany are to Macron, including to his domestic politics. To express his sense of urgency, Macron scheduled a public speech on Europe for September 25, 2017, the day after the German election, obviously expecting that Merkel would be certain of another term by then. Whether the content of the speech, given to students at the Sorbonne, had been discussed with Merkel beforehand one cannot know; certainly, it was carefully crafted to suit German “pro-Europeanism” while hiding conflicts behind rhetoric decipherable, if at all, only to the initiated. In the speech, Macron more openly than before committed himself to the Modell Deutschland version of French Europeanism, based on a belief in the salutary effect German inspired economic reform would have on France. In this vision, German concessions would be secured not through a political alliance with other Mediterranean countries, forming a structural majority in a “democratized” eurozone (as envisaged by the French Left), but from restored German faith in French reformism. As a first confidence-building measure, Macron suggested that France and Germany renew the Treaty on German-French Cooperation, signed on January 22, 1963, by Konrad Adenauer and Charles de Gaulle, also known as the Elysée Treaty or (particularly in Germany) the FrenchGerman Friendship Treaty. This was enthusiastically received in Germany for its ceremonial and sentimental value. To fill the gap during the Merkel interregnum, the Bundestag staged a celebration of the Treaty’s fifty-fifth (!) anniversary in January 2018, with a speech by the president of the Assemblée nationale given, in flawless German, to a full house. Later that same day, a delegation of Bundestag members attended a parallel session in Paris, where Wolfgang Schäuble spoke as the Bundestag’s newly elected president. This time, however, the auditorium was almost empty, something the German media hid as best they could.
     
    :)

    That’s pretty perceptive, and useful since I don’t think people outside Germany quite get how “Europe” is a quasi-religious project in German political discourse, with dissent marking you out as a morally deficient person, possibly a Nazi.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Also how it’s difficult to understand the German mindset which now conflates German economic self-interests with common European interests and even moral values in a way which I had thought only Jews were capable of. On the other hand it also thinks basic self-preservation instincts should be abolished for the greater good, even for Germany itself. Here also Jews come to mind, more precisely the liberal secular atheist Jews, who, while spreading the rot for others, are themselves disappearing and promote policies for themselves which long term destroy them just as much as others.
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  199. Mikhail says: • Website

    CNN’s idea of media review, regarding the Kiev regime’s stunt with Babs:

    https://www.cnn.com/videos/tv/2018/06/03/the-journalistic-ethics-of-faking-a-death-rs.cnn/video/playlists/reliable-sources-highlights/

    No challenge whatsoever to the much overrated Julia Ioffe, presenting dubious opinions as facts. Specifically, stating that the Russian government poisoned the Skripals and downed a civilian airliner over eastern Ukraine.

    Later with the JRL court appointed Russia friendly types, who do handshakeable things like promote Meduza over the Strategic Culture Foundation.

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  200. @German_reader
    That's pretty perceptive, and useful since I don't think people outside Germany quite get how "Europe" is a quasi-religious project in German political discourse, with dissent marking you out as a morally deficient person, possibly a Nazi.

    Also how it’s difficult to understand the German mindset which now conflates German economic self-interests with common European interests and even moral values in a way which I had thought only Jews were capable of. On the other hand it also thinks basic self-preservation instincts should be abolished for the greater good, even for Germany itself. Here also Jews come to mind, more precisely the liberal secular atheist Jews, who, while spreading the rot for others, are themselves disappearing and promote policies for themselves which long term destroy them just as much as others.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    I know, Germans are basically insane and incapable of any rational discussion. Everything is covered under a thick layer of moralistic self-righteousness, no opposing views to be tolerated. I still think talk of the EU as a "German imperial project" misses the mark (many Germans really believe in the EU as some kind of atonement for Nazism, bizarre as that may seem), but I can see how others find German national character quite insufferable. I wish it were different, but that would require a complete change of German political culture.
    , @songbird
    Atheistic Jews may just fade into the woodwork, with a combination of low TFR and intermarriage. Of course, they'll be affected in other ways, but I don't expect them to be pogromed, unless they start giving out DNA tests and offing anyone >10% Ashkenazi, which seems unlikely.

    I know many atheistic half-Jews love Jewish identity, but I think they can take it or leave it, depending on how well it suites their political goals. It is the religious ones who will be screwed.
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  201. @reiner Tor
    Also how it’s difficult to understand the German mindset which now conflates German economic self-interests with common European interests and even moral values in a way which I had thought only Jews were capable of. On the other hand it also thinks basic self-preservation instincts should be abolished for the greater good, even for Germany itself. Here also Jews come to mind, more precisely the liberal secular atheist Jews, who, while spreading the rot for others, are themselves disappearing and promote policies for themselves which long term destroy them just as much as others.

    I know, Germans are basically insane and incapable of any rational discussion. Everything is covered under a thick layer of moralistic self-righteousness, no opposing views to be tolerated. I still think talk of the EU as a “German imperial project” misses the mark (many Germans really believe in the EU as some kind of atonement for Nazism, bizarre as that may seem), but I can see how others find German national character quite insufferable. I wish it were different, but that would require a complete change of German political culture.

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    • Replies: @Mitleser
    I think Thorfinnsson spoke about how Swedes went from one excess into another.
    Germans seems to be similar, replacing toxic national socialism with toxic German Europeanism rather than some moderate German nationalism.
    , @Mitleser
    The EU is an imperial project, France's imperial project.

    French ideas of statehood, of Europe, and of the legitimacy of national interests differ significantly from German ones. Since the end of World War II, the principal objective of French policy has been to bind Germany, or what was left of it, into a French-led Europe.20 While France would provide Germany with international representation through European institutions, Germany would lend to France, or to French-led Europe, its economic prowess. Soon-to-be-united Europe was conceived, as a matter of course, as an extension of the French state, just as the Brussels Commission was conceived as a sub-department of French technocracy. That France insisted on defending its national sovereignty was, from a French perspective, never a problem.21 For example, when British accession threatened to interfere with the conception of an integrated Europe as a kind of Greater France, Charles de Gaulle vetoed it. Subsequent unwillingness on the part of French governments to discuss the finalité of European integration seems to have been due in part to unresolved differences over whether it would be possible to create a European construction that could include the Northern Europeans without undermining French dominance.
     

    In any case, there are reasons to take Macron’s electoral project seriously, especially in light of its parallels to his “refounding” of the French political system. In its essence, the project comes down to nothing less than a revolutionary attack on the supranational center-left-cum-center-right establishment in Brussels organized around the techno-bureaucracy of the Commission and a powerless Parliament.43 Macron’s electoral strategy would mop up free-floating “cosmopolitan” sentiment among the young and the professional middle classes, not just in France and Italy but also in Germany, as manifested for example by the “Pulse of Europe” events in the summer and fall of 2017.44 The hoped-for result would be a European version of Macron’s synthetic quasi-party, La République en Marche (LaREM), consisting of mostly political newcomers and Macron himself as the charismatic, bonapartiste leader, bringing to bear plebiscitary-populist legitimacy, not just on Brussels, but also on EU member states in the name, provocatively, of a “sovereign Europe.”

    Macron’s initiative reveals not just boundless personal self-confidence, fortified no doubt by his victory in 2017 and, perhaps, by German adulation. It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty.45 While in Germany a sovereign Europe is the desirable termination of national, including German, sovereignty, in France it is a condition, or a contemporary version, of a sovereign France. Replication of LaREM at the European level in particular—the destruction of the postwar party system and the replacement of its dual center with a Partei neuen Typs (in Leninist terms)—far from abolishes French national sovereignty but widens and thereby preserves it.
     
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  202. utu says:
    @German_reader

    I would consider a possibility that Orban’s Fidesz in Hungary and PiS in Poland have a strong support of neocon faction of America’s Deep State with strong links to Israel.
     
    But you've got zero proof for that, and it seems very unlikely to me. Orban and the Polish government are strongly demonized even in US media as far as I can tell.
    That being said, I think there might indeed be a risk of European anti-establishment movements letting themselves become coopted into the imperial projects of the Americans. When I read something like this
    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/06/03/trumps-right-hand-man-in-europe-wants-to-empower-european-anti-establishment-conservatives/
    it certainly sets off my alarm bells. Grenell seems to have close contacts with John Bolton (he was his spokesman at the UN and seems to regard him as somewhat of a mentor) and also worked for Romney's campaign back in 2012 (before being removed because of his open homosexuality). That's not an "anti-establishment" background at all, it's the return of Bushism.
    So far he's criticized Germany for not taking part in airstrikes on Syria and has also demanded German companies should "immediately" leave Iran.
    Any European right-winger with self-respect should tell that presumptuous asshole and other Americans like him to take a hike.

    I wrote: ‘I would consider a possibility…’ to which you responded: ‘But you’ve got zero proof for that, and it seems very unlikely to me.’

    Sleepwalkers walk down the stairs unconcerned because they haven’t yet stumbled on some kind of proof that stairs may end. A part of inquiry is to make hypotheses and then to look for proofs not the other way around.

    But frankly for me it is more than just considering a possibility. I believe that all those attaches in embassies and NGO’s and their agents of influence are doing something and thinking about things that haven’t occurred to you or me.

    Grenell is just an overt manifestation of clumsy and heavy handed style of Trump administration. I argued a much stronger case than just a cooptation. I can image their fingers in the creation of these movements. I consider a possibility that nurturing anti-EU (which means anti-German) and anti-Muslim sentiments among European New Right in Europe will inevitably result in pro-Israel and pro-American stance of these factions providing that Russia will be made not attractive for the Nw Right which is being accomplished by the campaign of full spectrum Russia’s vilification. Hungary and Czechia try to be much more sensible in the act of balancing than Poland which is the most extreme in its anti Russia stance.

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  203. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    The only reason I can think of is that they are genuinely afraid to – that is the only reason that makes sense to me.
     
    Probably that. Wouldn't surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.

    Wouldn’t surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.

    I’ve always wondered what the Vegas odds are for things like this. Basically, what the market is saying about things the market doesn’t talk about, except perhaps in really obfuscated, nebulous ways. For my model of Saudi Arabia, I’d look to Iran and the Shah, except I think Saudi Arabia is probably easier to control from the top down, because of its more arid geography and smaller population. Age pyramid seems to be different too, not as lopsided, compared to revolutionary Iran. The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system to help him keep power too. What complicates things is there are millions of foreign nationals in Saudi Arabia.

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    • Replies: @German_reader

    The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system
     
    There's lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though, given the rather odd succession system (iirc so far all of the kings after the 1st have been his sons). If MbS has indeed been killed, this might be due to such conflicts, given how he tried to consolidate his power with rather ruthless methods.
    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.
    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be. Foreign intervention in Islam's holy places would probably look pretty provocative to many of the world's Muslims.
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  204. Mitleser says:
    @German_reader
    I know, Germans are basically insane and incapable of any rational discussion. Everything is covered under a thick layer of moralistic self-righteousness, no opposing views to be tolerated. I still think talk of the EU as a "German imperial project" misses the mark (many Germans really believe in the EU as some kind of atonement for Nazism, bizarre as that may seem), but I can see how others find German national character quite insufferable. I wish it were different, but that would require a complete change of German political culture.

    I think Thorfinnsson spoke about how Swedes went from one excess into another.
    Germans seems to be similar, replacing toxic national socialism with toxic German Europeanism rather than some moderate German nationalism.

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    • Agree: German_reader
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  205. @songbird

    Wouldn’t surprise me if the entire system in Saudi-Arabia collapses at some point in the 2020s and the royal family gets overthrown by jihadis.
     
    I've always wondered what the Vegas odds are for things like this. Basically, what the market is saying about things the market doesn't talk about, except perhaps in really obfuscated, nebulous ways. For my model of Saudi Arabia, I'd look to Iran and the Shah, except I think Saudi Arabia is probably easier to control from the top down, because of its more arid geography and smaller population. Age pyramid seems to be different too, not as lopsided, compared to revolutionary Iran. The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system to help him keep power too. What complicates things is there are millions of foreign nationals in Saudi Arabia.

    The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system

    There’s lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though, given the rather odd succession system (iirc so far all of the kings after the 1st have been his sons). If MbS has indeed been killed, this might be due to such conflicts, given how he tried to consolidate his power with rather ruthless methods.
    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.
    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be. Foreign intervention in Islam’s holy places would probably look pretty provocative to many of the world’s Muslims.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird

    There’s lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though
     
    Probably why cousin marriage is still a thing. Easy to pick a replacement with some legitimacy. The regime may have stability, even if the head does not.

    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.
     
    Neom sounds like a joke. It is like a satire of the ability of SA to modernize.

    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be.
     
    Probably a coalition of Sunni partners with Western advisors.
    , @Dmitry
    They have a large system of welfare, which results in a well disposed population (government giving to the public freely petrodollars is the opium of the masses).

    The issue of peasant uprising will be if oil demand falls (probably in the 2030s), and they cannot transition to other sources of income fast enough, and the system of welfare becomes bankrupt.

    It's not the only oil-exporting country which may have the problem though, and is not yet preparing enough for transition - problem which, again, I guess could come as early as the 2030s.

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.

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  206. songbird says:
    @reiner Tor
    Also how it’s difficult to understand the German mindset which now conflates German economic self-interests with common European interests and even moral values in a way which I had thought only Jews were capable of. On the other hand it also thinks basic self-preservation instincts should be abolished for the greater good, even for Germany itself. Here also Jews come to mind, more precisely the liberal secular atheist Jews, who, while spreading the rot for others, are themselves disappearing and promote policies for themselves which long term destroy them just as much as others.

    Atheistic Jews may just fade into the woodwork, with a combination of low TFR and intermarriage. Of course, they’ll be affected in other ways, but I don’t expect them to be pogromed, unless they start giving out DNA tests and offing anyone >10% Ashkenazi, which seems unlikely.

    I know many atheistic half-Jews love Jewish identity, but I think they can take it or leave it, depending on how well it suites their political goals. It is the religious ones who will be screwed.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Regarding US Jewry, there has been a noticeable decline in reformed and conservative congregations.

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.

    Yeah, numerous part Jewish types who meet your criteria. There's also the flip side, involving Jews with another background or more, who are quite eclectic - Jewish issues included.
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  207. Mitleser says:
    @German_reader
    I know, Germans are basically insane and incapable of any rational discussion. Everything is covered under a thick layer of moralistic self-righteousness, no opposing views to be tolerated. I still think talk of the EU as a "German imperial project" misses the mark (many Germans really believe in the EU as some kind of atonement for Nazism, bizarre as that may seem), but I can see how others find German national character quite insufferable. I wish it were different, but that would require a complete change of German political culture.

    The EU is an imperial project, France’s imperial project.

    French ideas of statehood, of Europe, and of the legitimacy of national interests differ significantly from German ones. Since the end of World War II, the principal objective of French policy has been to bind Germany, or what was left of it, into a French-led Europe.20 While France would provide Germany with international representation through European institutions, Germany would lend to France, or to French-led Europe, its economic prowess. Soon-to-be-united Europe was conceived, as a matter of course, as an extension of the French state, just as the Brussels Commission was conceived as a sub-department of French technocracy. That France insisted on defending its national sovereignty was, from a French perspective, never a problem.21 For example, when British accession threatened to interfere with the conception of an integrated Europe as a kind of Greater France, Charles de Gaulle vetoed it. Subsequent unwillingness on the part of French governments to discuss the finalité of European integration seems to have been due in part to unresolved differences over whether it would be possible to create a European construction that could include the Northern Europeans without undermining French dominance.

    In any case, there are reasons to take Macron’s electoral project seriously, especially in light of its parallels to his “refounding” of the French political system. In its essence, the project comes down to nothing less than a revolutionary attack on the supranational center-left-cum-center-right establishment in Brussels organized around the techno-bureaucracy of the Commission and a powerless Parliament.43 Macron’s electoral strategy would mop up free-floating “cosmopolitan” sentiment among the young and the professional middle classes, not just in France and Italy but also in Germany, as manifested for example by the “Pulse of Europe” events in the summer and fall of 2017.44 The hoped-for result would be a European version of Macron’s synthetic quasi-party, La République en Marche (LaREM), consisting of mostly political newcomers and Macron himself as the charismatic, bonapartiste leader, bringing to bear plebiscitary-populist legitimacy, not just on Brussels, but also on EU member states in the name, provocatively, of a “sovereign Europe.”

    Macron’s initiative reveals not just boundless personal self-confidence, fortified no doubt by his victory in 2017 and, perhaps, by German adulation. It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty.45 While in Germany a sovereign Europe is the desirable termination of national, including German, sovereignty, in France it is a condition, or a contemporary version, of a sovereign France. Replication of LaREM at the European level in particular—the destruction of the postwar party system and the replacement of its dual center with a Partei neuen Typs (in Leninist terms)—far from abolishes French national sovereignty but widens and thereby preserves it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty
     
    The French are the Americans of Europe.
    I wonder what's going to happen in Italy now, actually quite impressive in some ways that the Italians have managed to break with the political past (maybe easier there since their original party system collapsed in the early 1990s). I wish something like that were possible in Germany.
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  208. @Mitleser
    The EU is an imperial project, France's imperial project.

    French ideas of statehood, of Europe, and of the legitimacy of national interests differ significantly from German ones. Since the end of World War II, the principal objective of French policy has been to bind Germany, or what was left of it, into a French-led Europe.20 While France would provide Germany with international representation through European institutions, Germany would lend to France, or to French-led Europe, its economic prowess. Soon-to-be-united Europe was conceived, as a matter of course, as an extension of the French state, just as the Brussels Commission was conceived as a sub-department of French technocracy. That France insisted on defending its national sovereignty was, from a French perspective, never a problem.21 For example, when British accession threatened to interfere with the conception of an integrated Europe as a kind of Greater France, Charles de Gaulle vetoed it. Subsequent unwillingness on the part of French governments to discuss the finalité of European integration seems to have been due in part to unresolved differences over whether it would be possible to create a European construction that could include the Northern Europeans without undermining French dominance.
     

    In any case, there are reasons to take Macron’s electoral project seriously, especially in light of its parallels to his “refounding” of the French political system. In its essence, the project comes down to nothing less than a revolutionary attack on the supranational center-left-cum-center-right establishment in Brussels organized around the techno-bureaucracy of the Commission and a powerless Parliament.43 Macron’s electoral strategy would mop up free-floating “cosmopolitan” sentiment among the young and the professional middle classes, not just in France and Italy but also in Germany, as manifested for example by the “Pulse of Europe” events in the summer and fall of 2017.44 The hoped-for result would be a European version of Macron’s synthetic quasi-party, La République en Marche (LaREM), consisting of mostly political newcomers and Macron himself as the charismatic, bonapartiste leader, bringing to bear plebiscitary-populist legitimacy, not just on Brussels, but also on EU member states in the name, provocatively, of a “sovereign Europe.”

    Macron’s initiative reveals not just boundless personal self-confidence, fortified no doubt by his victory in 2017 and, perhaps, by German adulation. It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty.45 While in Germany a sovereign Europe is the desirable termination of national, including German, sovereignty, in France it is a condition, or a contemporary version, of a sovereign France. Replication of LaREM at the European level in particular—the destruction of the postwar party system and the replacement of its dual center with a Partei neuen Typs (in Leninist terms)—far from abolishes French national sovereignty but widens and thereby preserves it.
     

    It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty

    The French are the Americans of Europe.
    I wonder what’s going to happen in Italy now, actually quite impressive in some ways that the Italians have managed to break with the political past (maybe easier there since their original party system collapsed in the early 1990s). I wish something like that were possible in Germany.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    I'm a bit ignorant of German laws regarding birthplace and residency of political candidates, but here's my pitch for German political revolution: recruit David Hasselhoff to lead the German Freedom Party. Have him sing his nostalgia and German-unity inducing hit "Looking for Freedom" with a leather jacket with blinking lights. Have him belt out his ballad from the bucket of a cherrypicker, lifted into the sky, to crowds all over Germany, while people below him shoot off firecrackers.

    And I'm only half-joking: I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.
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  209. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    It also sheds light on the peculiar nature of French nationalism, which sees itself as universalism. From a French perspective, there is no conflict between a “sovereign France” and a “sovereign Europe,” as long as Europe is properly constituted on universal, i.e., French principles and governed out of Paris, as an extension of French sovereignty
     
    The French are the Americans of Europe.
    I wonder what's going to happen in Italy now, actually quite impressive in some ways that the Italians have managed to break with the political past (maybe easier there since their original party system collapsed in the early 1990s). I wish something like that were possible in Germany.

    I’m a bit ignorant of German laws regarding birthplace and residency of political candidates, but here’s my pitch for German political revolution: recruit David Hasselhoff to lead the German Freedom Party. Have him sing his nostalgia and German-unity inducing hit “Looking for Freedom” with a leather jacket with blinking lights. Have him belt out his ballad from the bucket of a cherrypicker, lifted into the sky, to crowds all over Germany, while people below him shoot off firecrackers.

    And I’m only half-joking: I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Another benefit of running Hasselhoff as a darkhorse candidate would be that he is a faux-German, and so born free of the original sin of Nazism and perhaps more immune from the slander. He has the appeal of global pop culture, so will seem cosmopolitan and not insular.
    , @German_reader

    I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.
     
    According to polls Merkel is still quite popular with many Germans. I have no idea why, but many people actually seem to really like her and consider her to be modest, selfless, competent etc. (instead of the narcissistic monster whose record is disastrous on every level that she actually is). Even her lack of rhetorical skills and her tendency to speak in meaningless platitudes might actually work in her favour, since Germans distrust charismatic orators, given the Hitler experience.
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  210. Mikhail says: • Website
    @songbird
    Atheistic Jews may just fade into the woodwork, with a combination of low TFR and intermarriage. Of course, they'll be affected in other ways, but I don't expect them to be pogromed, unless they start giving out DNA tests and offing anyone >10% Ashkenazi, which seems unlikely.

    I know many atheistic half-Jews love Jewish identity, but I think they can take it or leave it, depending on how well it suites their political goals. It is the religious ones who will be screwed.

    Regarding US Jewry, there has been a noticeable decline in reformed and conservative congregations.

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.

    Yeah, numerous part Jewish types who meet your criteria. There’s also the flip side, involving Jews with another background or more, who are quite eclectic – Jewish issues included.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.
     
    The latter part is one of those weird statistics that is easy to see, for you see a man with his wife or children and can easily identify him, which is something not even perfectly true of Mormons.
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  211. Mitleser says:
    @songbird
    If you ever want to redpill someone on race - someone who is reachable - first make all the arguments: scientific, observation, and theory - and then finally hand them a book on worldwide development. Preferably, one with a Leftist or PC author, since the question of regional differences will need to be addressed, and the excuses given for Africa will be side-splittingly funny and transparently stupid.

    Next step: Use the respected classics?

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    • Replies: @songbird
    Good idea.
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  212. songbird says:
    @songbird
    I'm a bit ignorant of German laws regarding birthplace and residency of political candidates, but here's my pitch for German political revolution: recruit David Hasselhoff to lead the German Freedom Party. Have him sing his nostalgia and German-unity inducing hit "Looking for Freedom" with a leather jacket with blinking lights. Have him belt out his ballad from the bucket of a cherrypicker, lifted into the sky, to crowds all over Germany, while people below him shoot off firecrackers.

    And I'm only half-joking: I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.

    Another benefit of running Hasselhoff as a darkhorse candidate would be that he is a faux-German, and so born free of the original sin of Nazism and perhaps more immune from the slander. He has the appeal of global pop culture, so will seem cosmopolitan and not insular.

    Read More
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  213. @songbird
    I'm a bit ignorant of German laws regarding birthplace and residency of political candidates, but here's my pitch for German political revolution: recruit David Hasselhoff to lead the German Freedom Party. Have him sing his nostalgia and German-unity inducing hit "Looking for Freedom" with a leather jacket with blinking lights. Have him belt out his ballad from the bucket of a cherrypicker, lifted into the sky, to crowds all over Germany, while people below him shoot off firecrackers.

    And I'm only half-joking: I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.

    I think he would mop the floor with Merkel.

    According to polls Merkel is still quite popular with many Germans. I have no idea why, but many people actually seem to really like her and consider her to be modest, selfless, competent etc. (instead of the narcissistic monster whose record is disastrous on every level that she actually is). Even her lack of rhetorical skills and her tendency to speak in meaningless platitudes might actually work in her favour, since Germans distrust charismatic orators, given the Hitler experience.

    Read More
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  214. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system
     
    There's lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though, given the rather odd succession system (iirc so far all of the kings after the 1st have been his sons). If MbS has indeed been killed, this might be due to such conflicts, given how he tried to consolidate his power with rather ruthless methods.
    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.
    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be. Foreign intervention in Islam's holy places would probably look pretty provocative to many of the world's Muslims.

    There’s lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though

    Probably why cousin marriage is still a thing. Easy to pick a replacement with some legitimacy. The regime may have stability, even if the head does not.

    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.

    Neom sounds like a joke. It is like a satire of the ability of SA to modernize.

    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be.

    Probably a coalition of Sunni partners with Western advisors.

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  215. songbird says:
    @Mitleser
    Next step: Use the respected classics?

    https://twitter.com/mostqualmishly/status/1003070751782719488

    Good idea.

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  216. songbird says:
    @Mikhail
    Regarding US Jewry, there has been a noticeable decline in reformed and conservative congregations.

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.

    Yeah, numerous part Jewish types who meet your criteria. There's also the flip side, involving Jews with another background or more, who are quite eclectic - Jewish issues included.

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.

    The latter part is one of those weird statistics that is easy to see, for you see a man with his wife or children and can easily identify him, which is something not even perfectly true of Mormons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Long Island has some areas (especially in the "Five Towns") which had noticeable conservative and reformed Jewish populations. Around the mid-1970s, (if not a bit sooner) that dynamic started to noticeably decreasee, as the orthodox Jews from NYC (mostly from Brooklyn) moved in, with the reformed and conservative Jews either moving out, getting intermarried and dying.

    Orthodox Jews put their kids in private Yeshivas, while serving on the public school boards, as is their right as tax payers. They proceed to advocate public school budgets cuts and typically succeed - in large part because the:

    - parents of kids attending public schools often don't bother to get involved
    - parents of kids attending non-Jewish private schools have a mutual interest with the orthodox Jews
    - as do households who don't have kids attending schools.

    I understand that a similar trend is evident in some other parts of the US.
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  217. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    The Shah probably did not have the same massive familial/tribal patronage system
     
    There's lots of potential for conflict in the royal family though, given the rather odd succession system (iirc so far all of the kings after the 1st have been his sons). If MbS has indeed been killed, this might be due to such conflicts, given how he tried to consolidate his power with rather ruthless methods.
    And I have difficulty imagining that a country like Saudi-Arabia can successfully modernize and move away from its dependence on oil.
    If there was indeed civil war in Saudi-Arabia and a risk of jihadis taking over, I wonder what the international reaction would be. Foreign intervention in Islam's holy places would probably look pretty provocative to many of the world's Muslims.

    They have a large system of welfare, which results in a well disposed population (government giving to the public freely petrodollars is the opium of the masses).

    The issue of peasant uprising will be if oil demand falls (probably in the 2030s), and they cannot transition to other sources of income fast enough, and the system of welfare becomes bankrupt.

    It’s not the only oil-exporting country which may have the problem though, and is not yet preparing enough for transition – problem which, again, I guess could come as early as the 2030s.

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Might even lead to trouble in the US, if the petrodollar collapses.
    , @German_reader

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.
     
    I doubt they'd let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don't really like Germans there (I've heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like "Next time we'll get you" in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s.
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  218. songbird says:
    @Dmitry
    They have a large system of welfare, which results in a well disposed population (government giving to the public freely petrodollars is the opium of the masses).

    The issue of peasant uprising will be if oil demand falls (probably in the 2030s), and they cannot transition to other sources of income fast enough, and the system of welfare becomes bankrupt.

    It's not the only oil-exporting country which may have the problem though, and is not yet preparing enough for transition - problem which, again, I guess could come as early as the 2030s.

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.

    Might even lead to trouble in the US, if the petrodollar collapses.

    Read More
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  219. @Dmitry
    They have a large system of welfare, which results in a well disposed population (government giving to the public freely petrodollars is the opium of the masses).

    The issue of peasant uprising will be if oil demand falls (probably in the 2030s), and they cannot transition to other sources of income fast enough, and the system of welfare becomes bankrupt.

    It's not the only oil-exporting country which may have the problem though, and is not yet preparing enough for transition - problem which, again, I guess could come as early as the 2030s.

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.

    I doubt they’d let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don’t really like Germans there (I’ve heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like “Next time we’ll get you” in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    I doubt they’d let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don’t really like Germans there (I’ve heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like “Next time we’ll get you” in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s
     
    This is what I was thinking about. Same question as for the Saudi Arabian economy, although surely at least more promising.

    What happens in the 2030s, when there is a high probability of peak, or even fall in global oil demand.

    The important thing is the economy can transition to other sources of income and development paths. Government knows the importance of this- but has not been a 'total success' so far with things like Skolkovo.

    So all the question is set for the 2020s - and how much more urgency there will be while there are still large scale oil incomes that can be re-invested into developing competitive export industries - hi-tech sector, tourist sector, automobile sector, etc.

    I feel a little confident just because I think the feeling of urgency and national prioritisation will be growing much greater in the 2020s.

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  220. Mikhail says: • Website
    @songbird

    Comparatively, the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox Jews seem to be holding their own.
     
    The latter part is one of those weird statistics that is easy to see, for you see a man with his wife or children and can easily identify him, which is something not even perfectly true of Mormons.

    Long Island has some areas (especially in the “Five Towns”) which had noticeable conservative and reformed Jewish populations. Around the mid-1970s, (if not a bit sooner) that dynamic started to noticeably decreasee, as the orthodox Jews from NYC (mostly from Brooklyn) moved in, with the reformed and conservative Jews either moving out, getting intermarried and dying.

    Orthodox Jews put their kids in private Yeshivas, while serving on the public school boards, as is their right as tax payers. They proceed to advocate public school budgets cuts and typically succeed – in large part because the:

    - parents of kids attending public schools often don’t bother to get involved
    - parents of kids attending non-Jewish private schools have a mutual interest with the orthodox Jews
    - as do households who don’t have kids attending schools.

    I understand that a similar trend is evident in some other parts of the US.

    Read More
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  221. Dmitry says:
    @German_reader

    I wonder if we should all be immigrating to somewhere safe like Switzerland by the 2030s.
     
    I doubt they'd let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don't really like Germans there (I've heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like "Next time we'll get you" in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s.

    I doubt they’d let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don’t really like Germans there (I’ve heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like “Next time we’ll get you” in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s

    This is what I was thinking about. Same question as for the Saudi Arabian economy, although surely at least more promising.

    What happens in the 2030s, when there is a high probability of peak, or even fall in global oil demand.

    The important thing is the economy can transition to other sources of income and development paths. Government knows the importance of this- but has not been a ‘total success’ so far with things like Skolkovo.

    So all the question is set for the 2020s – and how much more urgency there will be while there are still large scale oil incomes that can be re-invested into developing competitive export industries – hi-tech sector, tourist sector, automobile sector, etc.

    I feel a little confident just because I think the feeling of urgency and national prioritisation will be growing much greater in the 2020s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    Government knows the importance of this- but has not been a ‘total success’ so far with things like Skolkovo.
     
    It was an unpromising start in both Rusnano and Skolkovo.

    Former head of Rusnano accused for stealing funds, and former finance director of
    Skolkovo, also symmetrically accused for stealing funds (acquitted, but with a lot of funds missing).

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  222. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry

    I doubt they’d let me in, my set of skills is hardly high in demand, and they don’t really like Germans there (I’ve heard stories of Germans in Switzerland finding messages like “Next time we’ll get you” in their mail).
    Russia might be one of the better places to live by the 2030s
     
    This is what I was thinking about. Same question as for the Saudi Arabian economy, although surely at least more promising.

    What happens in the 2030s, when there is a high probability of peak, or even fall in global oil demand.

    The important thing is the economy can transition to other sources of income and development paths. Government knows the importance of this- but has not been a 'total success' so far with things like Skolkovo.

    So all the question is set for the 2020s - and how much more urgency there will be while there are still large scale oil incomes that can be re-invested into developing competitive export industries - hi-tech sector, tourist sector, automobile sector, etc.

    I feel a little confident just because I think the feeling of urgency and national prioritisation will be growing much greater in the 2020s.

    Government knows the importance of this- but has not been a ‘total success’ so far with things like Skolkovo.

    It was an unpromising start in both Rusnano and Skolkovo.

    Former head of Rusnano accused for stealing funds, and former finance director of
    Skolkovo, also symmetrically accused for stealing funds (acquitted, but with a lot of funds missing).

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  223. Yevardian says:
    @Anonymous

    I will be departing for Romania very early tomorrow. Any last tips/recs?
     
    Since this blog is in particular interested in ethnography can you go to the two counties in the middle of Transylvania that are majority Hungarian? I would like to hear your observations on how the Hungarian minority has avoided assimilation. Are they constantly hostile towards the majority (e.g. grocery clerks only speaking Hungarian to keep Romanians out)? What other strategies do the Hungarians use?

    Many of them in fact speak very poor Romanian. Outside of the major cities they mostly live in self-segregated villages. Driving through such areas you see Sekely flags or Hungarian tricolours everywhere.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    Outside of the major cities they mostly live in self-segregated villages.
     
    I guess you’re talking about the Székelys (sometimes called Szeklers in English).

    1) Those villages have been Hungarian for something like eight centuries or more. I don’t think “self-segregated” is a good description here.

    2) Székelys are less than a third of Hungarians in Romania anyway.

    3) The Székelys I’ve met where I found out about their knowledge of Romanian (or lack thereof) invariably could speak Romanian. For example they often could understand some Spanish or Italian based on the language, and then went on to tell me the same sentence in Romanian. Or stumbled into Romanians and managed to hold conversation with them. Though I cannot comment on the level of their knowledge beyond that. My understanding is that the older generations could speak only poor Romanian.

    I doubt non-Székely Hungarians speak only poor Romanian, since they live in majority Romanian areas. They are also mostly urbanized.
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  224. @Yevardian
    Many of them in fact speak very poor Romanian. Outside of the major cities they mostly live in self-segregated villages. Driving through such areas you see Sekely flags or Hungarian tricolours everywhere.

    Outside of the major cities they mostly live in self-segregated villages.

    I guess you’re talking about the Székelys (sometimes called Szeklers in English).

    1) Those villages have been Hungarian for something like eight centuries or more. I don’t think “self-segregated” is a good description here.

    2) Székelys are less than a third of Hungarians in Romania anyway.

    3) The Székelys I’ve met where I found out about their knowledge of Romanian (or lack thereof) invariably could speak Romanian. For example they often could understand some Spanish or Italian based on the language, and then went on to tell me the same sentence in Romanian. Or stumbled into Romanians and managed to hold conversation with them. Though I cannot comment on the level of their knowledge beyond that. My understanding is that the older generations could speak only poor Romanian.

    I doubt non-Székely Hungarians speak only poor Romanian, since they live in majority Romanian areas. They are also mostly urbanized.

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  225. AP says:
    @Dmitry
    AP have you been in these village?


    https://uzh-city.livejournal.com/10789.html

    No, I haven’t been to that oblast. It is one of the poorest ones in Ukraine so I suspect that this village is not typical. However Lviv outskirts look a but similar.

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  226. Kim replaces military leaders ahead of summit.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-04/kim-replaces-top-3-military-officials-ahead-historic-us-summit

    Apparently there are people in North Korea unwilling to give up nukes…

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  227. Gerard2 says:
    @AP
    Great comment.

    In Ukriane the more "uprooted" population in the newly-settled southern and eastern parts have been more pro-Soviet or pro-Russian, while the older longer-settled core territory has been more pro-Western.

    In Ukriane the more “uprooted” population in the newly-settled southern and eastern parts have been more pro-Soviet or pro-Russian, while the older longer-settled core territory has been more pro-Western.

    …again more stupidly braindead bollocks

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  228. Putin signs into law the counter-sanctions. I wonder if Anatoly could add some further information after he came back, I think it’s important enough to post about even with a delay.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-06-04/putin-signs-law-countersanctions-unfriendly-actions-us-and-its-allies

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  229. Dmitry says:

    In case anyone is interested – Some of the beautiful (expensive) stadiums built for the World Cup.

    Now Mordovia (only in the second league domestically and previously always with an 10,000 person stadium) has a 45,000 person stadium, to be a centerpiece of Saransk.

    The design of the stadium supposed to represent the sun.

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