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chernobyl-stalker

I got the opportunity to meet up with commenter AP this week. Had a very pleasant conversation with him, if a pretty short one as was necessitated by his busy schedule.

I had been hoping to do a long post on my travels in Portugal, not nuclear war, this week. Will hopefully get that up in a couple of days.

Featured News

* A new neoreactionary blog. Joshua Delamere: Colonization and its Discontents

* Steve Hsu: Evolution of Venture Capital: SV + Asia dominate (original WSJ article)

venture-capital-by-country

Even though I’m aware of these trends, even I’m still surprised about just how total the domination of the US and China is.

Japan is pretty prominent, but another infographic there makes it clear that the Japanese are investing into Chinese, American, and other Asian ventures – not into Japan itself, or Europe.

See also my recently articles on Europe Can’t Into Big Tech and Russia’s Technological Backwardness.

* Mike Johnson: Heuristics For Interpreting The Output Of Formal Panpsychist Theories Of Consciousness

* Emil Kirkegaard: Corvus intelligence

* Aubrey de Grey posts a proof of a mathematical theorem. Impressive. Also evidence that longevity research isn’t pseudoscience.

**

Russia

* FT: Russian oil groups brave cold of western sanctions to explore Arctic

* RFERL: The Wildest Rides Of The U.S.S.R.

* Assad has been added to Myrotvorets (Peacekeeper) website of enemies of the Ukraine. Has the Curse been invoked?

*RT: Russia to suspend nuclear, rocket cooperation with America, ban US tobacco & alcohol – draft law

* Russia has banned Telegram, a sort of hybrid of WhatsApp and Twitter. Officials are going to use Viber instead.

Normal countries either (1) permit a free market in this sphere, or (2) ban foreign companies and promote their own, such as China. Russia bans its own and promotes foreign companies.

* The world that the Bolsheviks destroyed: In 1900, the Czechs wanted to introduce mandatory teaching of Russian in Czech schools (though this was vetoed by Vienna). [in Russian]

***

World

* Sinotriumph Chronicles:

* Larry Kudlow acknowledges China as First World country.

* The Economist: Decades of optimism about China’s rise have been discarded

This is unironically good for China. When The Economist praises you, it’s time to reach for your pistol.

Foreign businesspeople talked of the “promise fatigue” that has set in as Chinese markets are opened only after they have ceased to matter (the recent decision to allow in American credit cards now mobile payment systems have made them irrelevant is an example).

This is just “kicking away the ladder” that most countries (inc. US) have engaged in.

* Why does China have such a low-key approach to Syria?

* Jon Hellevig: An Awara Accounting Study on US Economy 2018: Signs that the US Debt-Fueled Economy Might Actually Collapse

I’m skeptical. Collapse of the US has been predicted in “anti-imperialist” sphere as often as the collapse of Russia (or China) in the handshakeworthy quarters. But we’ll see.

* British free media:

* Bolton on the Muller probe:

* Percentage of population identifying as LGBTQ:

US: 12.1%
EU: 5.6%

Germany: 7.4%
Spain: 6.9%
UK: 6.5%
Netherlands: 6.4%
Austria: 6.2%
France: 5.4%
Poland: 4.9%
Italy: 4.8%
Hungary: 1.5%

America is very gay. A huge survey about 5 years ago put the percentage of homosexuals in the US at around 2.5% of the population, which seems plausible. But I suppose it’s since become much more prestigious and “handshakeworthy.”

Also this pattern of Poland being much gayer than the rest of the V4 continues.

**

Science & Culture

* Real Climate: Stronger evidence for a weaker Atlantic overturning circulation. Gulf Stream is shutting down, as predicted.

* Brandon Adamson: People Who Hate Each Other Against the War

* Based Xi:

* whyvert/Economist: The decline of socialist parties in Europe, Hungarian edition

hungary-political-spectrum

***

Powerful Takes

* Hats off to Thorfinnsson. I don’t think anybody else has so succinctly defined the iFag.

thorfinnsson-ifag

* Benefits of nuclear war?

**

 
• Category: Miscellaneous • Tags: China, IT, Open Thread 
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  1. Mr. XYZ says:

    Did the 2008-2009 financial crisis and recession severely discredit the Hungarian Social Democrats?

    What is the full story in regards to this?

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    They managed to get the country into a recession by 2007, the year when countries like Slovakia were still growing fast. In 2005 and early 2006 they were spending so much to win the election in spring 2006 that not only did they have to introduce an austerity package just months after the election (reversing some of the measures taken just months earlier...), but despite the austerity package the budget deficit in 2006 for the year as a whole was still near 10%. The austerity measures mostly consisted of tax increases in an already overtaxed economy, so already anemic growth ground to a standstill. The crisis finished us off.

    The obviously horrible mismanagement of the economy in itself might not have been enough to totally discredit them, but the then prime minister made a speech laced with profanities at a closed session of the socialists right after the election, a recording of which was leaked to the press. The speech contained the phrase “we screwed it up,” which became a rallying cry. Riots started, Fidesz became the most popular party, Jobbik started to become big, and people were calling for early elections in light of the fact that the socialists misled the country about the depth of the economic problems (caused by their own mismanagement) before the election. (The accepted budget for 2006 planned for a deficit of 6% of GDP, as mentioned they could only keep it under 10% after a severe austerity package. They kept denying the problems until having won the election, they even delayed the publication of a monthly deficit number right before the election night. If you stop to think about it, it’s pretty incredible how it was possible to conceal the size of the deficit for several months into the year in a civilized country.)

    While the socialists were running huge deficits, the free media was not alarmist or anything: the then prime minister had just lengthened their licenses, so obviously they saw no reason to be critical. They often criticized the “populism” of Orbán back then, so fortunately for us they didn’t completely refrain from criticizing politicians. There obviously was a free media in Hungary back then, since no international NGO criticized the situation where the two big private channels were broadly leftist and the state TV channels were also supportive of the government. Quite unlike the controlled media in the present, where the government controls the state TV channels (just like back then, very low ratings) and one of the two big private channels is also pro-government. (The other, RTL, is hostile. Interestingly, it has highest ratings. So the biggest TV channel is actually anti-Orbán. Such dictatorship!)
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
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  2. Mitleser says:

    * Russia has banned Telegram, a sort of hybrid of WhatsApp and Twitter. Officials are going to use Viber instead.

    Putin showed the power of the Russian state, at the time when it seemed weak and insignificant, when he overnight imprisoned Khodorkovsky, the richest man in Russia, and despoiled him of Yukos.

    Applies to Telegram too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. The world that the Bolsheviks destroyed: In 1900, the Czechs wanted to introduce mandatory teaching of Russian in Czech schools

    Don’t see how the Bolsheviks destroyed anything here, after all Russian did get mandatory in Czechoslovakia from 1948 onwards.
    I find those numbers about percentages of homos hard to believe (12% in the US??? Even the 7,4% in Germany seems absurdly high to me). Strange how being a homo has apparently become fashionable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to (as in the early 20th century).

    There's a big difference between the two. For instance, in Russian language teaching collapsing there (and the rest of Eastern Europe) after 1990.
    , @Mitleser
    LBGTs are minorities increasingly favored by the Western establishments.
    It is not surprising that being one of them became fashionable.
    , @songbird
    Was it really mandatory?

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian. He said no. English or Russian - you had a choice. I don't know if he was talking about the '80s or something, but, then again, postwar East Germany had what? Two leaders? So, I don't imagine it was different in the '70s, at least. Czechoslovakia probably was less constrained than East Germany, if anything.

    Maybe, there were political considerations - pick English and get fracked over careerwise. Or get greater scrutiny, but it was probably only the politicians who needed to know it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. @Mitleser

    * Russia has banned Telegram, a sort of hybrid of WhatsApp and Twitter. Officials are going to use Viber instead.
     

    Putin showed the power of the Russian state, at the time when it seemed weak and insignificant, when he overnight imprisoned Khodorkovsky, the richest man in Russia, and despoiled him of Yukos.
     
    Applies to Telegram too.

    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia’s strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Not a stooge, but...

    he gave some siloviks the fingers.
     
    That is not a trivial matter. That is challenging the state.

    http://johnhelmer.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/снимок-1.png
    , @dmitriev
    Anatoly, regarding the banning of Telegram and other such idiocy, I want to float an idea, feel free to run with it... this is mostly due to what I would call the "worst generation" being in power right now... i.e. the last Soviet/first post-Soviet generation. I'm talking about people around the age of Pyotr Tolstoy here, about 45-55. This isn't to say that the Soviet generation that preceded them was much better, but it is primarily this last Soviet generation that determines what happens in Russia right now. It's their mental complexes behind all these unnecessary bans and pseudo-conservative nonsense. They remind me of idiots with hammers looking for nails. Obviously I don't mean every person in that age group, but a very large part of them.

    The younger generation of today in my opinion is clearly better than the last Soviet/first post-Soviet generations. They drink less and have much less cockroaches in the brain. They're much more adapted to the modern world and not as "traumatized" by the post-Soviet transition. Basically, we will have to wait out this "worst generation" and hope they don't do too much damage in the meantime.
    , @ussr andy

    because he gave some siloviks the fingers.
     
    if they wanted from him what I think they wanted...

    if America has the capacity to do that stuff on its population using its companies' products (_NSAKEY, anyone), Russia should be able to using hers. (a more governable sheeple is good for defense, too.)
    (not trolling)
    but the guy chose to larp as a civil rights hero.
    I don't think he has any deep objections of a civic/philosophical kind. It's just that it sucks doing that for P.
    In America otoh, it's (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one's self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence. or maybe class loyalty.

    , @anonymous coward

    But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.
     
    False. VK was originally funded by organized crime, and Durov was their frontman stooge. When various actors (both state and big business) forced VK to clean up and divest from their shady connections, Durov had to go.

    Which was a huge win for him, because at the time he was embroiled in financial machinations and embezzling of company funds. The other alternative was him sleeping with the fishes, and the 'siloviks', whom he allegedly 'gave the finger' actually saved him from that fate.
    , @Sean
    Khodorkovsky and Nevzlin were just businessmen with the acumen native to their race, except for the fact they had people shot, kidnapped never to be heard of again, and blown up. But there is no proof and why should they do anything so stupid and obvious. Must have been a frame up by America and Britain.
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  5. @German_reader

    The world that the Bolsheviks destroyed: In 1900, the Czechs wanted to introduce mandatory teaching of Russian in Czech schools
     
    Don't see how the Bolsheviks destroyed anything here, after all Russian did get mandatory in Czechoslovakia from 1948 onwards.
    I find those numbers about percentages of homos hard to believe (12% in the US??? Even the 7,4% in Germany seems absurdly high to me). Strange how being a homo has apparently become fashionable.

    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to (as in the early 20th century).

    There’s a big difference between the two. For instance, in Russian language teaching collapsing there (and the rest of Eastern Europe) after 1990.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to
     
    Wasn't the Soviet Union pretty popular in Czechoslovakia in the immediate post-war era? The communists had very strong electoral results there iirc, and I suppose part of this was a view of Russia being the saviour from German occupation.
    Later events (1968) probably had a somewhat negative impact on those perceptions though.
    , @Beckow

    not because they actually wanted to (as in the early 20th century)
     
    You are applying today's narrative to the past, it wasn't at all like that. In 1900 a small group of Czech intellectuals proposed teaching Russian in schools, it was a symbolic gesture and totally hopeless. They had a pretty hard time just making sure that Czech was continued to be taught in the schools.

    Between 1945-55 (or even later) there was a genuine pro-Russian sentiment among plurality of Czechs - from nationalists to communists. The teaching of Russian was initially popular and demanded. Soviets (or Russians) liberated Czechs at a high cost. Czechs were almost certainly slated for soft extermination by Germans in WWII and they knew it.

    The pro-Russian euphoria lasted decades, 1968 invasion to suppress liberal communism (what the f..k was that?) changed things. But even today Czechs are relatively neutral and about half of the population, including the President, are by the Western standards quite pro-Russian. Of course, there are noisy Prague 'intellectuals', often paid for by the West, but not always, who are every bit as Russo-phobic as the waffle waitress from India yelling at UN, but they have always been weird. Most suffer from conflicted identity and dislike their own countrymen almost as much.

    Russian was offered as the main foreign language starting in the 5th grade until 1990. English, French, Spanish and eventually even German were offered as additional choices. Most university aiming students took Russian and English. The 'compulsory' teaching of Russian is based on some truth, on and off, but as with most Western narratives it is over-stated, misunderstands the context, and emotionalises relatively normal things. Today Russian is still taught, but minimally.
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  6. @Anatoly Karlin
    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to (as in the early 20th century).

    There's a big difference between the two. For instance, in Russian language teaching collapsing there (and the rest of Eastern Europe) after 1990.

    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to

    Wasn’t the Soviet Union pretty popular in Czechoslovakia in the immediate post-war era? The communists had very strong electoral results there iirc, and I suppose part of this was a view of Russia being the saviour from German occupation.
    Later events (1968) probably had a somewhat negative impact on those perceptions though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Most definitely. Among the future Warsaw Pact nations, the Red Army had the best end of WW II receptions in Belgrade, Sofia and Prague.
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  7. Mitleser says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    Not a stooge, but…

    he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    That is not a trivial matter. That is challenging the state.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Mitleser says:
    @German_reader

    The world that the Bolsheviks destroyed: In 1900, the Czechs wanted to introduce mandatory teaching of Russian in Czech schools
     
    Don't see how the Bolsheviks destroyed anything here, after all Russian did get mandatory in Czechoslovakia from 1948 onwards.
    I find those numbers about percentages of homos hard to believe (12% in the US??? Even the 7,4% in Germany seems absurdly high to me). Strange how being a homo has apparently become fashionable.

    LBGTs are minorities increasingly favored by the Western establishments.
    It is not surprising that being one of them became fashionable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    I don't know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.
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  9. Japan is pretty prominent, but another infographic there makes it clear that the Japanese are investing into Chinese, American, and other Asian ventures – not into Japan itself, or Europe.

    Japan’s venture capital is just Softbank.

    I’ve never even heard of Japanese VC outside of Softbank.

    Japanese programmers are allegedly twice as productive as American programmers, but the Japanese software industry is crippled by its focus on bespoke solutions.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LH

    Japanese programmers are allegedly twice as productive as American programmers

     

    Concept of programmer's productivity is ridiculous. What may be perceived as productive is usually spending all waking hours making large quantities of unusable shit. There are significant individual differences, but wasting the talent is really easy.

    Left alone programmers usually won't make much good. What matters is quality of the organisation: if they are able to find out the real requirements, if they are able to avoid useless complexity, if they know how to handle programmers as people. Most of organisations lack this ability and only measure harmful parameters like lines of code or hours spent.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. @Mitleser
    LBGTs are minorities increasingly favored by the Western establishments.
    It is not surprising that being one of them became fashionable.

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    A lot of it has to be girls picking Bi, which is popular and seen as hot.
    , @dfordoom

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.
     
    I suspect you'll find the figures are mostly inflated by women who want to combine fashion with virtue-signalling.

    If the media told women that it was the latest fashion to cut their left arms off lots of American women would be rushing off to the doctor to demand immediate amputation.
    , @Randal

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.
     
    Surely the whole point is that an awful lot of elite effort has been expended over the past few decades to propagandise people into not feeling that way about the idea (at least) of homosexuality. Largely, in the US sphere media, it's systematically depicted as a condition (and as hugely fashionable and attractive, involving as it does status raising victimhood nobility) rather than with any focus on the actual behaviour involved.

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of "homosexual" in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of "transgender" types reflects a similar process in that area. The results will be a lot of tragically messed up people a decade or two down the line, it seems to me.
    , @Wency
    An old friend/acquaintance of mine -- a guy who was once mostly normal (for a nerd) but always leaned left -- recently told me that he was "kind of gender-queer". As far as I can tell, all this means is that he can't grow facial hair and will occasionally make annoying remarks about dudes being "hot" while still wanting to exclusively bone women.

    But I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that he would respond "yes" -- with pride! -- if asked whether he is LGBTQ, and that, in fact, is the reason he says he is "kind of gender-queer" in the first place.

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  11. dmitriev says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    Anatoly, regarding the banning of Telegram and other such idiocy, I want to float an idea, feel free to run with it… this is mostly due to what I would call the “worst generation” being in power right now… i.e. the last Soviet/first post-Soviet generation. I’m talking about people around the age of Pyotr Tolstoy here, about 45-55. This isn’t to say that the Soviet generation that preceded them was much better, but it is primarily this last Soviet generation that determines what happens in Russia right now. It’s their mental complexes behind all these unnecessary bans and pseudo-conservative nonsense. They remind me of idiots with hammers looking for nails. Obviously I don’t mean every person in that age group, but a very large part of them.

    The younger generation of today in my opinion is clearly better than the last Soviet/first post-Soviet generations. They drink less and have much less cockroaches in the brain. They’re much more adapted to the modern world and not as “traumatized” by the post-Soviet transition. Basically, we will have to wait out this “worst generation” and hope they don’t do too much damage in the meantime.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    The world that the Bolsheviks destroyed: In 1900, the Czechs wanted to introduce mandatory teaching of Russian in Czech schools
     
    Don't see how the Bolsheviks destroyed anything here, after all Russian did get mandatory in Czechoslovakia from 1948 onwards.
    I find those numbers about percentages of homos hard to believe (12% in the US??? Even the 7,4% in Germany seems absurdly high to me). Strange how being a homo has apparently become fashionable.

    Was it really mandatory?

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian. He said no. English or Russian – you had a choice. I don’t know if he was talking about the ’80s or something, but, then again, postwar East Germany had what? Two leaders? So, I don’t imagine it was different in the ’70s, at least. Czechoslovakia probably was less constrained than East Germany, if anything.

    Maybe, there were political considerations – pick English and get fracked over careerwise. Or get greater scrutiny, but it was probably only the politicians who needed to know it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian
     
    The (admittedly few) East Germans I know did Russian at school. I know one family who left East Germany in the late 1980s before the wall came down, and iirc one of their daughters (who had been good at school in the GDR) had some problems in the West German school system because she'd only learned Russian, not English in the GDR.
    Wikipedia claims Russian was mandatory in the East German school system from 1949/50 onwards:
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schule_mit_erweitertem_Russischunterricht

    Russisch wurde seit dem Schuljahr 1949/50 als Sprache der osteuropäischen Führungsmacht Sowjetunion in allen DDR-Schulen ab dem 5. Schuljahr obligatorisch als erste Fremdsprache gelehrt
     
    = Russian was mandatory as first foreign language from the 5th school year onwards.
    Seems like English or French could be chosen as a 2nd foreign language later in one's school career.
    , @reiner Tor
    It was mandatory in Hungary until 1989. Deeply unpopular. Totally useless, too, because it was impossible to visit the place. The occupying Soviet soldiers were also strictly separated from the population. Their living conditions were horrible, though the rumors about it were only confirmed after they left the country and people could see their barracks. So they weren’t looked up to, no one wanted to become anything like the Russians. Soviet was uncool.
    , @LH
    @songbird

    Russian language was mandatory in Czechoslovakia, in primary and secondary education. Expectations and requirements were low, so it was possible to pass only by keeping attention in the classes.

    Soviet Union was perceived as backward country, and Russian language as virtually useless. Russian movies, books etc found no interest among the public, as they were ridiculously full of ideology. Few good ones were dubbed or translated anyway. Some Western technical textbooks/manuals may have been available only in Russian, but tell this to a young pupil.

    After 1989 teaching of Russian almost disappeared.


    Interestingly enough, there's small renaissance of Russian language teaching in the Czech Republic. About 15% of students in secondary education pick it up. Not because it got suddenly prestigious or useful, but because it takes much less time than learning German etc.
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  13. @German_reader
    I don't know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    A lot of it has to be girls picking Bi, which is popular and seen as hot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Those numbers are utterly implausible and well out of line with other surveys.
    , @Thorfinnsson
    This, along with the whole "Q" (queer category). This allows attention-seeking girls and mentally ill degenerates the fun and "prestige" of sexual degeneracy and perversion without actually having to, you know, do anything.

    This allows people to be:

    -Genderqueer
    -Pansexual
    -Demisexual
    -Sapiosexual
    -Asexual (loser's retreat)

    and God knows what else.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing, but male homosexuals probably not as much. There are however propaganda efforts underway to encourage straight men to try great stuff on account of, uh, it not being gay?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. ussr andy says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    if they wanted from him what I think they wanted…

    if America has the capacity to do that stuff on its population using its companies’ products (_NSAKEY, anyone), Russia should be able to using hers. (a more governable sheeple is good for defense, too.)
    (not trolling)
    but the guy chose to larp as a civil rights hero.
    I don’t think he has any deep objections of a civic/philosophical kind. It’s just that it sucks doing that for P.
    In America otoh, it’s (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one’s self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence. or maybe class loyalty.

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin

    In America otoh, it’s (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one’s self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence.
     
    Well, that is the cynical take, but in reality, Durov gave the FBI the finger too.

    Even so, the US has yet to block Telegram.
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  15. @songbird
    Was it really mandatory?

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian. He said no. English or Russian - you had a choice. I don't know if he was talking about the '80s or something, but, then again, postwar East Germany had what? Two leaders? So, I don't imagine it was different in the '70s, at least. Czechoslovakia probably was less constrained than East Germany, if anything.

    Maybe, there were political considerations - pick English and get fracked over careerwise. Or get greater scrutiny, but it was probably only the politicians who needed to know it.

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian

    The (admittedly few) East Germans I know did Russian at school. I know one family who left East Germany in the late 1980s before the wall came down, and iirc one of their daughters (who had been good at school in the GDR) had some problems in the West German school system because she’d only learned Russian, not English in the GDR.
    Wikipedia claims Russian was mandatory in the East German school system from 1949/50 onwards:

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schule_mit_erweitertem_Russischunterricht

    Russisch wurde seit dem Schuljahr 1949/50 als Sprache der osteuropäischen Führungsmacht Sowjetunion in allen DDR-Schulen ab dem 5. Schuljahr obligatorisch als erste Fremdsprache gelehrt

    = Russian was mandatory as first foreign language from the 5th school year onwards.
    Seems like English or French could be chosen as a 2nd foreign language later in one’s school career.

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    • Replies: @songbird
    That's curious.

    The guy I asked was youngish. He'd probably be about 50, at most now and possibly younger. At the time, I was surprised by his answer. He did know some Russian, so evidently he had at least also taken Russian, but he claimed to have forgotten it. Not sure if that is a cultural thing - almost daily contact with English and not with Russian - or if he had not taken as many years of Russian.

    It wouldn't surprise me if there were at least some changes to that policy in the '80s. The East Germans were doing a lot of business, basically selling Germans to the West Germany, as I'm sure you know, so I can imagine it being a simple concession to grant. I doubt if it makes much of a difference, but he came from Rostock. Wish I knew someone else to ask.

    He did give an answer that I thought was much more interesting to another question. (this was all many years ago) He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother. Honestly, we were all shocked. That was probably one of the earlier times, when I realized Western Europe was pretty messed up, but the same is true of the whole West now.
    , @MarkinPNW
    I remember a story told by the retired chief pilot of Lufthansa Airlines, Dieter Uchtdorf. He was from a family of Sudeten Germans who had to flee Czechoslovakia at the end of WW2 when he was just a toddler. The family settled in East Germany for several years where young Dieter learned Russian in school, and then the family moved to West Germany a few years before the Wall went up. Dieter reported how in their new home in West Germany, he had great trouble trying to learn English in contrast to his previously learning Russian, until he learned that English was required to become a pilot which was his childhood dream. Learning of that requirement apparently provided great motivation for him to learn the new, difficult language.
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  16. songbird says:

    China has a lot of power and influence. They might fairly be called a superpower or at least something close to it. For that reason and for all the cities filled with skyscrapers, the obvious economic growth and activity it may be tempting to overlook the low per capita. Or the limits on internal migration and political freedom.

    But can you drink the tap water? No – it is obviously not a first world country. Maybe, it will become one, but it sure as heck isn’t one yet. Not even a simulacrum. It’s not Africa, but at best it’s second world, something like the Eastern Bloc combined with NYC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I'm curious why you think that safe tap water availability for residential use is such a marker? My family has history with environmental engineering so I'm slightly more familiar with it, but its a pretty huge investment at this moment for China for something that has fairly minimal benefit. Water pollution, as a whole, is a major issue due to agricultural concerns. But residential use in China is mostly bottled or with home systems like this one for the adequately paranoid.

    To actually get safe residential tap water requires pure water at the purification plant, something that China is indeed working and does get a lot of money into it - China is trying to upscale this to football sized field from what I heard. Expected completion around 2020(? - something like that, I need to ask my father). But that's not enough to get residential tap water - you also need to control for pipes into the residences and that's probably something that's far too expensive to accomplish at the moment for not really that much gain.

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  17. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian
     
    The (admittedly few) East Germans I know did Russian at school. I know one family who left East Germany in the late 1980s before the wall came down, and iirc one of their daughters (who had been good at school in the GDR) had some problems in the West German school system because she'd only learned Russian, not English in the GDR.
    Wikipedia claims Russian was mandatory in the East German school system from 1949/50 onwards:
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schule_mit_erweitertem_Russischunterricht

    Russisch wurde seit dem Schuljahr 1949/50 als Sprache der osteuropäischen Führungsmacht Sowjetunion in allen DDR-Schulen ab dem 5. Schuljahr obligatorisch als erste Fremdsprache gelehrt
     
    = Russian was mandatory as first foreign language from the 5th school year onwards.
    Seems like English or French could be chosen as a 2nd foreign language later in one's school career.

    That’s curious.

    The guy I asked was youngish. He’d probably be about 50, at most now and possibly younger. At the time, I was surprised by his answer. He did know some Russian, so evidently he had at least also taken Russian, but he claimed to have forgotten it. Not sure if that is a cultural thing – almost daily contact with English and not with Russian – or if he had not taken as many years of Russian.

    It wouldn’t surprise me if there were at least some changes to that policy in the ’80s. The East Germans were doing a lot of business, basically selling Germans to the West Germany, as I’m sure you know, so I can imagine it being a simple concession to grant. I doubt if it makes much of a difference, but he came from Rostock. Wish I knew someone else to ask.

    He did give an answer that I thought was much more interesting to another question. (this was all many years ago) He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother. Honestly, we were all shocked. That was probably one of the earlier times, when I realized Western Europe was pretty messed up, but the same is true of the whole West now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    Not sure if that is a cultural thing – almost daily contact with English and not with Russian
     
    I'd suppose it's mostly that. Russian as a mandatory language in the East German school system was an artificial imposition anyway, for most East Germans it probably wasn't all that useful even back then, but one just had to take it. And after 1990 with the change of the political system it of course lost totally out to English.

    He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother.
     
    Yes, that's pretty decadent. Just googled it, and as I suspected, illegitimacy rates are way higher in East Germany than in West Germany (2014: 59% compared to 29%). Probably a result of the proletarianization of East German society during the GDR. West Germany is quite decadent in its own way though (suicidal xenophilia).
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  18. @songbird
    That's curious.

    The guy I asked was youngish. He'd probably be about 50, at most now and possibly younger. At the time, I was surprised by his answer. He did know some Russian, so evidently he had at least also taken Russian, but he claimed to have forgotten it. Not sure if that is a cultural thing - almost daily contact with English and not with Russian - or if he had not taken as many years of Russian.

    It wouldn't surprise me if there were at least some changes to that policy in the '80s. The East Germans were doing a lot of business, basically selling Germans to the West Germany, as I'm sure you know, so I can imagine it being a simple concession to grant. I doubt if it makes much of a difference, but he came from Rostock. Wish I knew someone else to ask.

    He did give an answer that I thought was much more interesting to another question. (this was all many years ago) He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother. Honestly, we were all shocked. That was probably one of the earlier times, when I realized Western Europe was pretty messed up, but the same is true of the whole West now.

    Not sure if that is a cultural thing – almost daily contact with English and not with Russian

    I’d suppose it’s mostly that. Russian as a mandatory language in the East German school system was an artificial imposition anyway, for most East Germans it probably wasn’t all that useful even back then, but one just had to take it. And after 1990 with the change of the political system it of course lost totally out to English.

    He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother.

    Yes, that’s pretty decadent. Just googled it, and as I suspected, illegitimacy rates are way higher in East Germany than in West Germany (2014: 59% compared to 29%). Probably a result of the proletarianization of East German society during the GDR. West Germany is quite decadent in its own way though (suicidal xenophilia).

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    • Replies: @songbird
    I was thinking something like that: his answer was probably somewhat more typical of an East German than a West German.

    It's supposedly a lagging effect of Communism that you create a culture where a lot of people, seeing that the system is messed up, think it is okay to cheat the system, so you end up having a big differential in Germany, a country that was reunited, even after Communism was abolished.

    But, of course, the same thing must happen outside of Communism. I don't know if I am just imagining it, but I think a lot more people in America are cheating the system now in various ways. And I don't just mean immigrants - I mean whites. Unscientifically, it seems like less are paying taxes, more are using illegal alien labor, more retiring on phony disability.
    , @reiner Tor

    for most East Germans it probably wasn’t all that useful even back then
     
    Same in Hungary. Soviet soldiers were prohibited from talking to civilians, and there was very little contact with the USSR. Though nominally the USSR was our greatest trading partner, it was highly centralized (so few people were needed to actually speak Russian), and contained a lot of bulk products like oil imports. It was even near impossible to visit the USSR as a tourist.

    To top it off, it was decidedly uncool and seen as being a horrible place to be.

    Q: What is the second prize of the contest “Who Knows More About The Soviet Union?” (It was an actual contest.)
    A: Two weeks in the USSR.
    Q: And what is the first prize?
    A: One week in the USSR.
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  19. Mikhail says: • Website
    @German_reader

    Well, it became mandatory because Czechoslovakia was in the Eastern Bloc, not because they actually wanted to
     
    Wasn't the Soviet Union pretty popular in Czechoslovakia in the immediate post-war era? The communists had very strong electoral results there iirc, and I suppose part of this was a view of Russia being the saviour from German occupation.
    Later events (1968) probably had a somewhat negative impact on those perceptions though.

    Most definitely. Among the future Warsaw Pact nations, the Red Army had the best end of WW II receptions in Belgrade, Sofia and Prague.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Yugoslavia was never in the Warsaw Pact.
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  20. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    Not sure if that is a cultural thing – almost daily contact with English and not with Russian
     
    I'd suppose it's mostly that. Russian as a mandatory language in the East German school system was an artificial imposition anyway, for most East Germans it probably wasn't all that useful even back then, but one just had to take it. And after 1990 with the change of the political system it of course lost totally out to English.

    He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother.
     
    Yes, that's pretty decadent. Just googled it, and as I suspected, illegitimacy rates are way higher in East Germany than in West Germany (2014: 59% compared to 29%). Probably a result of the proletarianization of East German society during the GDR. West Germany is quite decadent in its own way though (suicidal xenophilia).

    I was thinking something like that: his answer was probably somewhat more typical of an East German than a West German.

    It’s supposedly a lagging effect of Communism that you create a culture where a lot of people, seeing that the system is messed up, think it is okay to cheat the system, so you end up having a big differential in Germany, a country that was reunited, even after Communism was abolished.

    But, of course, the same thing must happen outside of Communism. I don’t know if I am just imagining it, but I think a lot more people in America are cheating the system now in various ways. And I don’t just mean immigrants – I mean whites. Unscientifically, it seems like less are paying taxes, more are using illegal alien labor, more retiring on phony disability.

    Read More
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  21. Anonymous[244] • Disclaimer says:

    Nikki Haley, the Clemson accounting and fashion merchandising major, is going to announce tougher sanctions against Russia tomorrow. Karlin, you’re a Cal-Berkeley econ major, what effect will this have on Russia? Is Russia being hurt badly with sanctions so far? Will they turn the population against Putin and the Syria mission? What’s the goal of the West? Will it work?

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  22. dfordoom says: • Website
    @German_reader
    I don't know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    I suspect you’ll find the figures are mostly inflated by women who want to combine fashion with virtue-signalling.

    If the media told women that it was the latest fashion to cut their left arms off lots of American women would be rushing off to the doctor to demand immediate amputation.

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  23. Mr. XYZ says:

    : Agreed that West Germans are more xenophilic than East Germans are. However, it’s interesting that Angela Merkel is from East Germany and yet was the one who opened Germany’s doors to a million Muslims in 2015-2016.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Not your typical Ossie. Her father voluntarily went there. Most Ossies wanted to leave.
    , @Rifleman

    Agreed that West Germans are more xenophilic than East Germans are. However, it’s interesting that Angela Merkel is from East Germany and yet was the one who opened Germany’s doors to a million Muslims in 2015-2016.
     
    Because she's an ugly old, childless hag who hates German nationalism and probably has some subconscious desire for revenge against Western Germany.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_8kc19DL70
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  24. @Mr. XYZ
    Did the 2008-2009 financial crisis and recession severely discredit the Hungarian Social Democrats?

    What is the full story in regards to this?

    They managed to get the country into a recession by 2007, the year when countries like Slovakia were still growing fast. In 2005 and early 2006 they were spending so much to win the election in spring 2006 that not only did they have to introduce an austerity package just months after the election (reversing some of the measures taken just months earlier…), but despite the austerity package the budget deficit in 2006 for the year as a whole was still near 10%. The austerity measures mostly consisted of tax increases in an already overtaxed economy, so already anemic growth ground to a standstill. The crisis finished us off.

    The obviously horrible mismanagement of the economy in itself might not have been enough to totally discredit them, but the then prime minister made a speech laced with profanities at a closed session of the socialists right after the election, a recording of which was leaked to the press. The speech contained the phrase “we screwed it up,” which became a rallying cry. Riots started, Fidesz became the most popular party, Jobbik started to become big, and people were calling for early elections in light of the fact that the socialists misled the country about the depth of the economic problems (caused by their own mismanagement) before the election. (The accepted budget for 2006 planned for a deficit of 6% of GDP, as mentioned they could only keep it under 10% after a severe austerity package. They kept denying the problems until having won the election, they even delayed the publication of a monthly deficit number right before the election night. If you stop to think about it, it’s pretty incredible how it was possible to conceal the size of the deficit for several months into the year in a civilized country.)

    While the socialists were running huge deficits, the free media was not alarmist or anything: the then prime minister had just lengthened their licenses, so obviously they saw no reason to be critical. They often criticized the “populism” of Orbán back then, so fortunately for us they didn’t completely refrain from criticizing politicians. There obviously was a free media in Hungary back then, since no international NGO criticized the situation where the two big private channels were broadly leftist and the state TV channels were also supportive of the government. Quite unlike the controlled media in the present, where the government controls the state TV channels (just like back then, very low ratings) and one of the two big private channels is also pro-government. (The other, RTL, is hostile. Interestingly, it has highest ratings. So the biggest TV channel is actually anti-Orbán. Such dictatorship!)

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  25. @songbird
    Was it really mandatory?

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian. He said no. English or Russian - you had a choice. I don't know if he was talking about the '80s or something, but, then again, postwar East Germany had what? Two leaders? So, I don't imagine it was different in the '70s, at least. Czechoslovakia probably was less constrained than East Germany, if anything.

    Maybe, there were political considerations - pick English and get fracked over careerwise. Or get greater scrutiny, but it was probably only the politicians who needed to know it.

    It was mandatory in Hungary until 1989. Deeply unpopular. Totally useless, too, because it was impossible to visit the place. The occupying Soviet soldiers were also strictly separated from the population. Their living conditions were horrible, though the rumors about it were only confirmed after they left the country and people could see their barracks. So they weren’t looked up to, no one wanted to become anything like the Russians. Soviet was uncool.

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    • Replies: @bb.
    well maybe it was useless given the circumstances, I think the information technology for the full potentiality was not there yet(cableTV, satellite, internet), but I would argue it was not useless for the Hungarians per se....especially for the Huns. I always thought, that a substantial part of your present plight, relative to V4, is your language. You are surrounded by slavic speakers yet nobody understands you. I would say the penalties are huge...think of just all the money wasted on translators. On the other side, here in Slovakia we profit from it, with our substantial Hun minority, everyone knows at least one person with a...easy to identify accent :) Also, the Czechs and Poles access you through us. But we are a special case, you know...all the Greater Hungary maps in your schools:)
    , @songbird
    That's interesting - I had never thought of that before - they never even had good opportunity to practice it. I knew there was a lot of horizontal integration in the economies of the Warsaw Pact, but I imagine not many negotiations.

    I believe there was a case in East Germany, where two kids were shot on the Soviet barracks, while trying to get scrap metal. That short of outcome makes mores sense with little interaction.

    I've always been really curious about the schools in the Eastern Bloc. Which ways they may have differed from the West, and which ways were they the same? Sort of thing. Did they have a pledge of allegiance? A flag or someone's portrait? What sort of politics infiltrated or were in the textbooks? But a lot of that stuff seems to be too humdrum for an English-speaking audience, and I haven't really come across any references to it, though I have read a lot of books on Communism.

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  26. @German_reader

    Not sure if that is a cultural thing – almost daily contact with English and not with Russian
     
    I'd suppose it's mostly that. Russian as a mandatory language in the East German school system was an artificial imposition anyway, for most East Germans it probably wasn't all that useful even back then, but one just had to take it. And after 1990 with the change of the political system it of course lost totally out to English.

    He had a pregnant girlfriend, and another American asked if he was going to marry her. He said no because the state would give her more benefits as a single mother.
     
    Yes, that's pretty decadent. Just googled it, and as I suspected, illegitimacy rates are way higher in East Germany than in West Germany (2014: 59% compared to 29%). Probably a result of the proletarianization of East German society during the GDR. West Germany is quite decadent in its own way though (suicidal xenophilia).

    for most East Germans it probably wasn’t all that useful even back then

    Same in Hungary. Soviet soldiers were prohibited from talking to civilians, and there was very little contact with the USSR. Though nominally the USSR was our greatest trading partner, it was highly centralized (so few people were needed to actually speak Russian), and contained a lot of bulk products like oil imports. It was even near impossible to visit the USSR as a tourist.

    To top it off, it was decidedly uncool and seen as being a horrible place to be.

    Q: What is the second prize of the contest “Who Knows More About The Soviet Union?” (It was an actual contest.)
    A: Two weeks in the USSR.
    Q: And what is the first prize?
    A: One week in the USSR.

    Read More
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  27. @Mikhail
    Most definitely. Among the future Warsaw Pact nations, the Red Army had the best end of WW II receptions in Belgrade, Sofia and Prague.

    Yugoslavia was never in the Warsaw Pact.

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    • Replies: @utu
    Recently I had a talk with a Black vet who claims that in 1982 he and couple dozens of Army Rangers were dropped into Yugoslavia where they stayed several months training some kind of militia. I am not in position to press him harder on details but the date does not add up with everything I know of what I knew what was going on in early 1980s. Reagan administration came up with the destabilization plan for Warsaw Pact countries in 1982 that in 1984 also included Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia in 1982 was stable and I can't imagine US Army Rangers being deployed there w/o some approval of Yugo gov. Official Army Rangers records do not mention of such a deployment.
    , @Mikhail
    Correct.

    Should've been stated that the Red Army had the best end of WW II welcome in Belgrade, Sofia and Prague - the capitals of three post-WW II Communist states.
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  28. @Mr. XYZ
    @German_reader: Agreed that West Germans are more xenophilic than East Germans are. However, it's interesting that Angela Merkel is from East Germany and yet was the one who opened Germany's doors to a million Muslims in 2015-2016.

    Not your typical Ossie. Her father voluntarily went there. Most Ossies wanted to leave.

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  29. Thanks very much for the mention, Anatoly. Work keeps me busy so I’m shooting for a once-a-week schedule for now. Anyone interested in a non-Academy rendering of colonization’s history and the current state of former colonies might enjoy my blog; this stuff has been covered by others but hopefully not as in depth.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    Your comment seems to be in reply to Karlin's description of a recent meeting with 'AP' in Moscow? Your biography within your new blog, https://joshuadelamere.wordpress.com/, seems different than the one I've been able to piece together for 'AP' at Dr. Motyl's former blog, this one and Karlin's former solo blog. Are you indeed 'AP' the analytical commenter of Ukrainian descent that I've been following and corresponding with for the last several years?...

    AK: No, they have nothing in common with each other. And please, no attempts to "guess" the identities of people who want to remain anonymous on my blog. Thanks.
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  30. utu says:
    @reiner Tor
    Yugoslavia was never in the Warsaw Pact.

    Recently I had a talk with a Black vet who claims that in 1982 he and couple dozens of Army Rangers were dropped into Yugoslavia where they stayed several months training some kind of militia. I am not in position to press him harder on details but the date does not add up with everything I know of what I knew what was going on in early 1980s. Reagan administration came up with the destabilization plan for Warsaw Pact countries in 1982 that in 1984 also included Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia in 1982 was stable and I can’t imagine US Army Rangers being deployed there w/o some approval of Yugo gov. Official Army Rangers records do not mention of such a deployment.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    I think unofficially it was assumed that Yugoslavia would either stay friendly neutral or fight on the side of the Warsaw Pact in WW3. But of course such assumptions have proved wrong before. The Yugoslavs clearly never wanted to be occupied by the Soviets.
    , @The Big Red Scary
    I once met a black guy wearing Orthodox Christian prayer knots as a necklace. He told me that they were given to him as a gift when he visited Serbia, where he had a wonderful time and people were incredibly kind and welcoming to him. That was in the 2000s. But an American black dude in Yugoslavia in 1982 might be just a little out of place, don't you think?
    , @LondonBob
    Right around the time Force 10 from Navarrone came out, that had a black guy parachuting in to Yugoslaviato meet up with partisans.
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  31. @utu
    Recently I had a talk with a Black vet who claims that in 1982 he and couple dozens of Army Rangers were dropped into Yugoslavia where they stayed several months training some kind of militia. I am not in position to press him harder on details but the date does not add up with everything I know of what I knew what was going on in early 1980s. Reagan administration came up with the destabilization plan for Warsaw Pact countries in 1982 that in 1984 also included Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia in 1982 was stable and I can't imagine US Army Rangers being deployed there w/o some approval of Yugo gov. Official Army Rangers records do not mention of such a deployment.

    I think unofficially it was assumed that Yugoslavia would either stay friendly neutral or fight on the side of the Warsaw Pact in WW3. But of course such assumptions have proved wrong before. The Yugoslavs clearly never wanted to be occupied by the Soviets.

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  32. Russia bans its own and promotes foreign companies.

    Telegram is not Russian. (This is, in fact, the reason why it was banned: it’s not a Russian product nor a Russian company, despite what people think.)

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  33. @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    False. VK was originally funded by organized crime, and Durov was their frontman stooge. When various actors (both state and big business) forced VK to clean up and divest from their shady connections, Durov had to go.

    Which was a huge win for him, because at the time he was embroiled in financial machinations and embezzling of company funds. The other alternative was him sleeping with the fishes, and the ‘siloviks’, whom he allegedly ‘gave the finger’ actually saved him from that fate.

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  34. Mikhail says: • Website
    @reiner Tor
    Yugoslavia was never in the Warsaw Pact.

    Correct.

    Should’ve been stated that the Red Army had the best end of WW II welcome in Belgrade, Sofia and Prague – the capitals of three post-WW II Communist states.

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  35. LondonBob says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    A lot of it has to be girls picking Bi, which is popular and seen as hot.

    Those numbers are utterly implausible and well out of line with other surveys.

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  36. America is very gay. A huge survey about 5 years ago put the percentage of homosexuals in the US at around 2.5% of the population, which seems plausible. But I suppose it’s since become much more prestigious and “handshakeworthy.”

    I’m very skeptical of 12.1%, but if that turned out to be accurate, it would have terrifying implications for the various hypotheses about the causes of sexual abnormality. The “gay germ” is highly contagious? There has been some relatively recent environmental contamination, only now reaching high levels of concentration in humans? Our minds really are so feeble that they can be reprogrammed by mass media to induce Darwinian self-destruction?

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  37. @ussr andy

    because he gave some siloviks the fingers.
     
    if they wanted from him what I think they wanted...

    if America has the capacity to do that stuff on its population using its companies' products (_NSAKEY, anyone), Russia should be able to using hers. (a more governable sheeple is good for defense, too.)
    (not trolling)
    but the guy chose to larp as a civil rights hero.
    I don't think he has any deep objections of a civic/philosophical kind. It's just that it sucks doing that for P.
    In America otoh, it's (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one's self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence. or maybe class loyalty.

    In America otoh, it’s (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one’s self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence.

    Well, that is the cynical take, but in reality, Durov gave the FBI the finger too.

    Even so, the US has yet to block Telegram.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Big Red Scary
    Perhaps Yasha Levine himself is sincere, but the piece to which you link sounds suspiciously hagiographic. I recommend reading the discussions here to get a more levelheaded take on the issues involved:

    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14534033

    Anyway, all of this talk of who funds what is irrelevant. The whole point is that if the code is really open source and you can compile it yourself, then it's completely unimportant whether you trust Eve.
    For us plebs, of course, there is the problem that the hardware might be corrupted. But governments could build their own. And this really shouldn't be that hard to do for a dedicated encrypter/decrypter.

    By the way, it's not just Durov who sells himself as some kind of crypto-anarchist saint. Lots of people play that shtick, notably Moxy Marlinspike of Signal fame.
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  38. Russia has banned Telegram, a sort of hybrid of WhatsApp and Twitter. Officials are going to use Viber instead.

    I’ve heard good things about Telegram’s user interface, but none of the well known encrypted messaging apps are really credible. Even if they claim to be open source, but require you to use their private servers, how would you know that they are actually running code that they claim to be running? You can’t know them from Eve, and the whole damned point of public key cryptography is to make it unnecessary to trust Eve.

    If the Russian government is really telling “officials” to use Viber, then they are stupider than I feared. I hope that’s just for the clowns in the Duma, not the important ministries and administrations of the Russian government.

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  39. Randal says:

    “I am LGBT” hashtag reportedly blocked on Weibo, as Chinese activists report growing pressure on #LGBT advocacy.

    Well the BBC front page story this morning is:

    China’s Sina Weibo backtracks from gay content ban after outrage

    That would be ok if it reflected a principled commitment to freedom of speech, but obviously that isn’t the case. In reality it’s a depressing reflection of the power of the homosexual behaviour normalisation lobby, even in China.

    If the Chinese can’t see the likely end results of making such concessions even with the horrible example of the US sphere prancing in front of them in a rainbow leotard, what hope is there for them?

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  40. Randal says:
    @German_reader
    I don't know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.

    Surely the whole point is that an awful lot of elite effort has been expended over the past few decades to propagandise people into not feeling that way about the idea (at least) of homosexuality. Largely, in the US sphere media, it’s systematically depicted as a condition (and as hugely fashionable and attractive, involving as it does status raising victimhood nobility) rather than with any focus on the actual behaviour involved.

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of “homosexual” in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of “transgender” types reflects a similar process in that area. The results will be a lot of tragically messed up people a decade or two down the line, it seems to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of “homosexual” in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of “transgender” types reflects a similar process in that area.
     
    I hope it's really just due to indoctrination. Bad as that is, the alternative explanation - a real increase in homos and transgenders due to some environmental poison in plastics or something of the sort - is actually much scarier.
    , @Talha
    Say what you want about Africans, but they don't have ridiculous public debates about stuff like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjTG28W4jKw

    They know when to call it out (2:30 - LOOOL!):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFikhFtMvpc

    They definitely don't want "eatin' da poo poo" to be normalized:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjnrLt3VuSM
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  41. @Anatoly Karlin

    In America otoh, it’s (apparently) possible to cooperate with them without one’s self-conception as a fundamentally good person taking a hit, so strong is the cultural confidence.
     
    Well, that is the cynical take, but in reality, Durov gave the FBI the finger too.

    Even so, the US has yet to block Telegram.

    Perhaps Yasha Levine himself is sincere, but the piece to which you link sounds suspiciously hagiographic. I recommend reading the discussions here to get a more levelheaded take on the issues involved:

    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14534033

    Anyway, all of this talk of who funds what is irrelevant. The whole point is that if the code is really open source and you can compile it yourself, then it’s completely unimportant whether you trust Eve.
    For us plebs, of course, there is the problem that the hardware might be corrupted. But governments could build their own. And this really shouldn’t be that hard to do for a dedicated encrypter/decrypter.

    By the way, it’s not just Durov who sells himself as some kind of crypto-anarchist saint. Lots of people play that shtick, notably Moxy Marlinspike of Signal fame.

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  42. @utu
    Recently I had a talk with a Black vet who claims that in 1982 he and couple dozens of Army Rangers were dropped into Yugoslavia where they stayed several months training some kind of militia. I am not in position to press him harder on details but the date does not add up with everything I know of what I knew what was going on in early 1980s. Reagan administration came up with the destabilization plan for Warsaw Pact countries in 1982 that in 1984 also included Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia in 1982 was stable and I can't imagine US Army Rangers being deployed there w/o some approval of Yugo gov. Official Army Rangers records do not mention of such a deployment.

    I once met a black guy wearing Orthodox Christian prayer knots as a necklace. He told me that they were given to him as a gift when he visited Serbia, where he had a wonderful time and people were incredibly kind and welcoming to him. That was in the 2000s. But an American black dude in Yugoslavia in 1982 might be just a little out of place, don’t you think?

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  43. 22pp22 says:

    I am glad NZ bucks the trend of high IQ people being concentrated in urban areas. Marlborough is the sticks. There is no town there of any size.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/better-business/89570838/Chart-of-the-day-Which-region-has-the-most-students-leaving-school-with-NCEA-2-or-above

    Northland and Gisborne are mainly Maori. Nelson is a town of about 50,000. Otago (population 224,000) is a huge and very rural province with one city of any size, Dunedin (population 120,000).

    If the rest of the world decides to destroy itself, hopefully they’ll forget we even exist and New Zealand will emerge as the world’s dominant power.

    Which is as it should be.

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    • Replies: @Singh
    We'll swim over from the Himalaya and rape you again।।
    , @RadicalCenter
    Nah, dude, NZ'ers will be speaking Mandarin like most of the rest of Asia.
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  44. LondonBob says:
    @utu
    Recently I had a talk with a Black vet who claims that in 1982 he and couple dozens of Army Rangers were dropped into Yugoslavia where they stayed several months training some kind of militia. I am not in position to press him harder on details but the date does not add up with everything I know of what I knew what was going on in early 1980s. Reagan administration came up with the destabilization plan for Warsaw Pact countries in 1982 that in 1984 also included Yugoslavia. Yugoslavia in 1982 was stable and I can't imagine US Army Rangers being deployed there w/o some approval of Yugo gov. Official Army Rangers records do not mention of such a deployment.

    Right around the time Force 10 from Navarrone came out, that had a black guy parachuting in to Yugoslaviato meet up with partisans.

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    • LOL: utu
    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Force 10 from Navarrone was filmed in Yugo and with a noticeable pro-Partizan/anti-Chetnik twist that distorts what actually happened.
    , @songbird
    The black guy (Carl Weathers) was really funny. Of course, he has some racially charged scenes with the non-Communists. Hollywood writers!
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  45. Randal says:

    Nice slap-down for the execrable Macron:

    Syria: Trump still favors timely withdrawal despite Macron assurances of longterm engagement

    But noticeable that the White House formulation still ensures the wiggle room to allow indefinite US murderous meddling in Syria:

    What the White House said:
    “The US mission has not changed, the president has been clear that he wants US forces to come home as quickly as possible,” Sanders said in a statement.
    “We are determined to completely crush ISIS [Islamic State] and create the conditions that will prevent its return.
    “In addition, we expect our regional allies and partners to take greater responsibility both militarily and financially for securing the region.”

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  46. Dmitry says:

    And today debate again about banning all VPN services, although Roskomnadzor says they avoid supporting this proposal for the present moment (it feel like it is a future stage).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Well until that day

    https://ic.pics.livejournal.com/nkramolnik/79254609/63104/63104_original.jpg
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  47. The Gulf Stream is not shutting down. All oceans have a gyre caused by the Coriolis effect. The Gulf Stream is part of the gyre of the North Atlantic. Because the Coriolis effect will never cease neither will the gyres.
    Climate alarmist reports also tend to exaggerate the influence of the Gulf Stream on european climate which is something still not clearly understood.

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  48. I think Russian counter-sanctions should be more targeted. They should selectively hurt people or companies, even countries. That way it might influence behavior, because some people or companies will try to avoid getting on the list. Even if the targeting is initially more or less random, people will believe there was some basis to it, or there might be some basis to it in the future, and will try to reduce their chances of being added to the list. (At least in case there is some real price to be paid.)

    Same thing with diplomatic measures. It should probably focus on the UK as the most hostile state. (Other than the US which is too large for Russia and would be difficult to attack.) It could advise all its citizens to leave the UK as their safety cannot be guaranteed. Then they could greatly reduce (perhaps fully break?) diplomatic relations (for example reducing their London staff to 5 or 3 diplomats, not allowing any more British diplomats in Moscow, explaining that they don’t need any direct contact to American satellites and puppet states). They should pursue relentlessly hurting the UK, while being lenient towards other countries, even hostile ones. That way many countries might fear getting “the UK treatment” if they go too far in Russia bashing. Differential treatment might be helpful.

    At least that’s Nassim Taleb’s advice (don’t usually waste energy to react to insults or attacks, but occasionally disproportionately overreact and punish relentlessly – that way people won’t want to attack you, because they will fear getting into your crosshairs with the chance of an “irrational” revenge-campaign by you), and I think that would at least have a chance to work.

    Besides, with the UK there’s the chance that a lot of Russian money might return from the UK, and possibly a lot of pro-Western London dwellers might get hurt by it.

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    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Singh
    At least that’s Nassim Taleb’s advice (don’t usually waste energy to react to insults or attacks, but occasionally disproportionately overreact and punish relentlessly.

    Anyone with a bad temper knows this।।
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  49. Singh says:
    @22pp22
    I am glad NZ bucks the trend of high IQ people being concentrated in urban areas. Marlborough is the sticks. There is no town there of any size.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/better-business/89570838/Chart-of-the-day-Which-region-has-the-most-students-leaving-school-with-NCEA-2-or-above

    Northland and Gisborne are mainly Maori. Nelson is a town of about 50,000. Otago (population 224,000) is a huge and very rural province with one city of any size, Dunedin (population 120,000).

    If the rest of the world decides to destroy itself, hopefully they'll forget we even exist and New Zealand will emerge as the world's dominant power.

    Which is as it should be.

    We’ll swim over from the Himalaya and rape you again।।

    Read More
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  50. Singh says:
    @reiner Tor
    I think Russian counter-sanctions should be more targeted. They should selectively hurt people or companies, even countries. That way it might influence behavior, because some people or companies will try to avoid getting on the list. Even if the targeting is initially more or less random, people will believe there was some basis to it, or there might be some basis to it in the future, and will try to reduce their chances of being added to the list. (At least in case there is some real price to be paid.)

    Same thing with diplomatic measures. It should probably focus on the UK as the most hostile state. (Other than the US which is too large for Russia and would be difficult to attack.) It could advise all its citizens to leave the UK as their safety cannot be guaranteed. Then they could greatly reduce (perhaps fully break?) diplomatic relations (for example reducing their London staff to 5 or 3 diplomats, not allowing any more British diplomats in Moscow, explaining that they don't need any direct contact to American satellites and puppet states). They should pursue relentlessly hurting the UK, while being lenient towards other countries, even hostile ones. That way many countries might fear getting "the UK treatment" if they go too far in Russia bashing. Differential treatment might be helpful.

    At least that's Nassim Taleb's advice (don't usually waste energy to react to insults or attacks, but occasionally disproportionately overreact and punish relentlessly - that way people won't want to attack you, because they will fear getting into your crosshairs with the chance of an "irrational" revenge-campaign by you), and I think that would at least have a chance to work.

    Besides, with the UK there's the chance that a lot of Russian money might return from the UK, and possibly a lot of pro-Western London dwellers might get hurt by it.

    At least that’s Nassim Taleb’s advice (don’t usually waste energy to react to insults or attacks, but occasionally disproportionately overreact and punish relentlessly.

    Anyone with a bad temper knows this।।

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    • Agree: reiner Tor
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  51. Conclusions:

    1. Russia won and it wasn’t even close. The fact that the Russophiles (and even actual Russians like Anatoly) refuse to see that shows just how warped peoples brains are over all this nonsense.

    2. Assad is there forever and Russia is there forever.

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    I get that the Unz commetariat would have preferred WWIII but Putin is a President, not a dictator. His clique has no desire to see the destruction of the earth so Putin did the right thing: take the win and play the long game.

    4. Regardless of what Trump says, the US is never leaving. Or at least not until the US dissolves in 20 years. If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux. Magnier can write all the fan fiction he wants but Syria will never be whole again.

    5. The only reason the US launched this completely useless operation is because Trump had that Twitter meltdown. The strikes did nothing because they were designed to do nothing except for allow Trump’s dumb ass to save some face. The next time Assad uses gas, there will be no US response. Trump has learned his lesson.

    6. Turkey supporting the US strikes cannot be seen as anything other than a huge diplomatic failure for Russia and a demonstration of just how fantastical the Saker/Magnier dream of Turkish/Russian alliance is. Erdogan is a delusional neo-Ottoman and he has no interest in being Putin’s junior partner.

    7. 2020 is a long time away but Trump is headed towards re-election the same way he was last week. Russophiles live in a dream world where anymore than a handful of Americans care about Syria or Assad. “America First” meant anti immigration, anti trade and anti regime change. It never meant anti air strikes or anti police actions because Americans, even Trump voters, simply do not care about those things and nothing will ever change that. The Spencer, Duke, Ramzpaul and Cernovich types can say that they are taking their ball and going home but they said the exact same thing last year and such types account for maybe 10k total votes nationwide, and I’m being extremely generous with that number.

    Let me put it this way: if the US had proportional representation, a pro Syria party would not even get 0.5% of the vote.

    Nobody cares about Syria! Own your irrelevance.

    8. Lost in the commotion over these meaningless US air strikes is that Israel has launched yet another attack inside Syria on an Iranian base. That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    The devastating Iranian response should be coming shortly.

    9. The Russophiles are really excited about word out our eternal, undivided capitol of Jerusalem that we have some concerns about the s-300. This is typical of the way that Russophile’s just don’t get Israeli politics:

    A. Israel complains every time any of it’s enemies get any weapons. They went crazy when the US sold Saudi Arabia AWACS in the 80s, much more so then they are upset about the s-300s. They screamed bloody murder about Russia replenishing Assad Sr.’s SA-6′s in the late 70′s before the IAF effortless destroyed all of them in the 82 war. Israeli’s just love to complain. Don’t read too much into it.

    B. Russia has a history of jerking it’s clients around when it comes to the s-300. They promise to sell it and then they never do. Doesn’t happen always but it happens frequently and it will probably happen here.

    C. The IAF is well equipped to handle the s-300 and s-400. They’ve been drilling extensively against both systems for years. If Syria gets the s-300, and it probably wont’, Israel will destroy it with the loss of few, if any, aircraft.

    So all in all, things are looking pretty good: Trump cruising to reelection, no escalation between Russia and the US, Syria remains permanently divided and all out war between Israel on one side and Syria/Iran/Hezbollah on the other is closer then ever.

    I ask again: what’s not to like?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.
     
    Dude, Russian territory is as close to Syria as Boston is to D.C. (currently living in both I can tell you that they are not that far apart). Some of the precision-guided munitions the Russians launched from Caspian Flotilla into Syria in October 2015 went double that distance. And when you’re talking what they can launch from land, their territory, it will be raining hell upon any NATO military assets.
    , @Jon0815

    If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux.
     
    The USA has around 2000 troops in all of Syria. The Wagner incident involved only around 500 pro-government fighters, who had no SAMs to defend against close air support, and who seem to have been taken by surprise. The liberation of East Ghouta has freed up about 25,000 Syrian troops, while defeat of the remaining rebels in Idlib and elsewhere will free up tens of thousands more. No amount of airstrikes can stop 25,000-50,000 Syrian troops from overrunning the already outnumbered SDF at the al-Omar oilfields in hours.
    , @iffen
    That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    I wish I could bring up those comments. I just can't quite remember ....
    , @The Kulak
    You love to bash Magnier, but what is Trump who already wants US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs?

    Individuals such as yourself or to take a more extreme example, Michael Daeshbag Weiss, who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare. He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.

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  52. bb. says:
    @reiner Tor
    It was mandatory in Hungary until 1989. Deeply unpopular. Totally useless, too, because it was impossible to visit the place. The occupying Soviet soldiers were also strictly separated from the population. Their living conditions were horrible, though the rumors about it were only confirmed after they left the country and people could see their barracks. So they weren’t looked up to, no one wanted to become anything like the Russians. Soviet was uncool.

    well maybe it was useless given the circumstances, I think the information technology for the full potentiality was not there yet(cableTV, satellite, internet), but I would argue it was not useless for the Hungarians per se….especially for the Huns. I always thought, that a substantial part of your present plight, relative to V4, is your language. You are surrounded by slavic speakers yet nobody understands you. I would say the penalties are huge…think of just all the money wasted on translators. On the other side, here in Slovakia we profit from it, with our substantial Hun minority, everyone knows at least one person with a…easy to identify accent :) Also, the Czechs and Poles access you through us. But we are a special case, you know…all the Greater Hungary maps in your schools:)

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  53. Mr. Hack says:
    @joshuadelamere
    Thanks very much for the mention, Anatoly. Work keeps me busy so I'm shooting for a once-a-week schedule for now. Anyone interested in a non-Academy rendering of colonization's history and the current state of former colonies might enjoy my blog; this stuff has been covered by others but hopefully not as in depth.

    Your comment seems to be in reply to Karlin’s description of a recent meeting with ‘AP’ in Moscow? Your biography within your new blog, https://joshuadelamere.wordpress.com/, seems different than the one I’ve been able to piece together for ‘AP’ at Dr. Motyl’s former blog, this one and Karlin’s former solo blog. Are you indeed ‘AP’ the analytical commenter of Ukrainian descent that I’ve been following and corresponding with for the last several years?…

    AK: No, they have nothing in common with each other. And please, no attempts to “guess” the identities of people who want to remain anonymous on my blog. Thanks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @joshuadelamere
    As AK says, I am not the same person...I was just replying to AK kindly linking my blog, that's all. I'll probably spill biographical info as I go along, but yes, I remain anonymous because I can't quit my day job yet.
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  54. Anonymous[196] • Disclaimer says:
    @Greasy William
    Conclusions:

    1. Russia won and it wasn't even close. The fact that the Russophiles (and even actual Russians like Anatoly) refuse to see that shows just how warped peoples brains are over all this nonsense.

    2. Assad is there forever and Russia is there forever.

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    I get that the Unz commetariat would have preferred WWIII but Putin is a President, not a dictator. His clique has no desire to see the destruction of the earth so Putin did the right thing: take the win and play the long game.

    4. Regardless of what Trump says, the US is never leaving. Or at least not until the US dissolves in 20 years. If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux. Magnier can write all the fan fiction he wants but Syria will never be whole again.

    5. The only reason the US launched this completely useless operation is because Trump had that Twitter meltdown. The strikes did nothing because they were designed to do nothing except for allow Trump's dumb ass to save some face. The next time Assad uses gas, there will be no US response. Trump has learned his lesson.

    6. Turkey supporting the US strikes cannot be seen as anything other than a huge diplomatic failure for Russia and a demonstration of just how fantastical the Saker/Magnier dream of Turkish/Russian alliance is. Erdogan is a delusional neo-Ottoman and he has no interest in being Putin's junior partner.

    7. 2020 is a long time away but Trump is headed towards re-election the same way he was last week. Russophiles live in a dream world where anymore than a handful of Americans care about Syria or Assad. "America First" meant anti immigration, anti trade and anti regime change. It never meant anti air strikes or anti police actions because Americans, even Trump voters, simply do not care about those things and nothing will ever change that. The Spencer, Duke, Ramzpaul and Cernovich types can say that they are taking their ball and going home but they said the exact same thing last year and such types account for maybe 10k total votes nationwide, and I'm being extremely generous with that number.

    Let me put it this way: if the US had proportional representation, a pro Syria party would not even get 0.5% of the vote.

    Nobody cares about Syria! Own your irrelevance.

    8. Lost in the commotion over these meaningless US air strikes is that Israel has launched yet another attack inside Syria on an Iranian base. That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    The devastating Iranian response should be coming shortly.

    9. The Russophiles are really excited about word out our eternal, undivided capitol of Jerusalem that we have some concerns about the s-300. This is typical of the way that Russophile's just don't get Israeli politics:

    A. Israel complains every time any of it's enemies get any weapons. They went crazy when the US sold Saudi Arabia AWACS in the 80s, much more so then they are upset about the s-300s. They screamed bloody murder about Russia replenishing Assad Sr.'s SA-6's in the late 70's before the IAF effortless destroyed all of them in the 82 war. Israeli's just love to complain. Don't read too much into it.

    B. Russia has a history of jerking it's clients around when it comes to the s-300. They promise to sell it and then they never do. Doesn't happen always but it happens frequently and it will probably happen here.

    C. The IAF is well equipped to handle the s-300 and s-400. They've been drilling extensively against both systems for years. If Syria gets the s-300, and it probably wont', Israel will destroy it with the loss of few, if any, aircraft.

    ...

    So all in all, things are looking pretty good: Trump cruising to reelection, no escalation between Russia and the US, Syria remains permanently divided and all out war between Israel on one side and Syria/Iran/Hezbollah on the other is closer then ever.

    I ask again: what's not to like?

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    Dude, Russian territory is as close to Syria as Boston is to D.C. (currently living in both I can tell you that they are not that far apart). Some of the precision-guided munitions the Russians launched from Caspian Flotilla into Syria in October 2015 went double that distance. And when you’re talking what they can launch from land, their territory, it will be raining hell upon any NATO military assets.

    Read More
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  55. @Daniel Chieh
    A lot of it has to be girls picking Bi, which is popular and seen as hot.

    This, along with the whole “Q” (queer category). This allows attention-seeking girls and mentally ill degenerates the fun and “prestige” of sexual degeneracy and perversion without actually having to, you know, do anything.

    This allows people to be:

    -Genderqueer
    -Pansexual
    -Demisexual
    -Sapiosexual
    -Asexual (loser’s retreat)

    and God knows what else.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing, but male homosexuals probably not as much. There are however propaganda efforts underway to encourage straight men to try great stuff on account of, uh, it not being gay?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Are Christians "hymenosexual" or "matrimoniosexual"?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Part of the entire annoying "Queer" conquest to define every single behavior as a form of sexuality. Pretty much its impossible for them to go through any book, for example Anne of Green Gables, and not find proof that every female close friend is therefore evidence of lesbianism and pretty much any example of Mannerbund can probably turn into gay love after a "queer scholar."

    Its retarded.
    , @songbird
    I agree: lesbians are increasing.

    I think women don't have the same natural disgust for the same sex as most men do. Women have a greater need for companionship and, if the right man doesn't come along, I think any with a little mustache will turn. The amount of true lesbians - hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them - is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.
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  56. Anon[291] • Disclaimer says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    This, along with the whole "Q" (queer category). This allows attention-seeking girls and mentally ill degenerates the fun and "prestige" of sexual degeneracy and perversion without actually having to, you know, do anything.

    This allows people to be:

    -Genderqueer
    -Pansexual
    -Demisexual
    -Sapiosexual
    -Asexual (loser's retreat)

    and God knows what else.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing, but male homosexuals probably not as much. There are however propaganda efforts underway to encourage straight men to try great stuff on account of, uh, it not being gay?

    Are Christians “hymenosexual” or “matrimoniosexual”?

    Read More
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  57. Dem lead on the Generic ballot down to 6: https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/congress-generic-ballot-polls/

    There do not exist instruments which can measure how little the American electorate cares about Syria.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Another ray of light:

    https://twitter.com/BrittonTallar42/status/985886257887809536
    , @John Gruskos
    If Americans don't care about Syria, then it doesn't make any sense for Americans to risk WW3 (and the demographic swamping of Europe, and the extermination of Middle Eastern Christians, and the revival of Al-Qaeda/ISIS) to ensure Israel's preferred outcome in Syria.
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  58. @songbird
    China has a lot of power and influence. They might fairly be called a superpower or at least something close to it. For that reason and for all the cities filled with skyscrapers, the obvious economic growth and activity it may be tempting to overlook the low per capita. Or the limits on internal migration and political freedom.

    But can you drink the tap water? No - it is obviously not a first world country. Maybe, it will become one, but it sure as heck isn't one yet. Not even a simulacrum. It's not Africa, but at best it's second world, something like the Eastern Bloc combined with NYC.

    I’m curious why you think that safe tap water availability for residential use is such a marker? My family has history with environmental engineering so I’m slightly more familiar with it, but its a pretty huge investment at this moment for China for something that has fairly minimal benefit. Water pollution, as a whole, is a major issue due to agricultural concerns. But residential use in China is mostly bottled or with home systems like this one for the adequately paranoid.

    To actually get safe residential tap water requires pure water at the purification plant, something that China is indeed working and does get a lot of money into it – China is trying to upscale this to football sized field from what I heard. Expected completion around 2020(? – something like that, I need to ask my father). But that’s not enough to get residential tap water – you also need to control for pipes into the residences and that’s probably something that’s far too expensive to accomplish at the moment for not really that much gain.

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    • Replies: @songbird
    It's expensive, sure, and, probably, not a priority, or something to rush. It involves a lot of engineering and planning, and China probably has extra hurdles that the US didn't have. The US had a lot of open land near cities, and wealthy people with large estates near lakes and ponds who made bequests. None of its cities were as populous, at the time and arguably they had nowhere near as many.

    Don't misunderstand me. I'm not saying China can't do it, but rather that you have arrived at first world status when you can drink the tap water and not before. It is probably the best single metric, other than per capita. It's not just surface-level infrastructure, like roads and electricity, which are, of course, really important and can be complicated. It is essentially a ridiculous luxury for the public - something that even with the awesome engineering in ancient cities like Rome - never existed before the US.

    IMO, China will have really only arrived - exceeded the US - when you can go to practically any city and drink the water. Even if the per capita is still lower, it won't matter - it will be meaningless. I'm not talking about the ability to project power, but lifestyle. That is what First World means to me. The USSR powerful as it was, was, of course, never First World.
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  59. @Randal

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.
     
    Surely the whole point is that an awful lot of elite effort has been expended over the past few decades to propagandise people into not feeling that way about the idea (at least) of homosexuality. Largely, in the US sphere media, it's systematically depicted as a condition (and as hugely fashionable and attractive, involving as it does status raising victimhood nobility) rather than with any focus on the actual behaviour involved.

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of "homosexual" in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of "transgender" types reflects a similar process in that area. The results will be a lot of tragically messed up people a decade or two down the line, it seems to me.

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of “homosexual” in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of “transgender” types reflects a similar process in that area.

    I hope it’s really just due to indoctrination. Bad as that is, the alternative explanation – a real increase in homos and transgenders due to some environmental poison in plastics or something of the sort – is actually much scarier.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    And since we're talking about homos and trannies:
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/16/eurovision-winner-conchita-reveals-hiv-diagnosis?CMP=twt_gu
    So at least in this case poz has to be understood quite literally.
    , @Anon 2
    I suspect, as someone had already pointed out, that the high percentage
    of the LGBTs in the U.S. is mostly due to the women declaring themselves
    bisexual. It's a standard joke, at least in the United States, that every
    female college student will experiment with lesbianism at some point.
    Many admit to being bi-curious. I have personally known at least 3
    students who went through a lesbian phase. It's a splendid way to
    avoid pregnancy while getting your jollies and emotional support as well.
    One now lives in a liberal whitopia where you get a lot of brownie points
    for declaring solidarity with the LGBTs. I know for a fact she loves to
    have sex with men ... because she told me so. She is one of those young
    women who will bend your ear talking about their orgasms, why they take
    so long, why they are sometimes painful, and why women should tell
    their boyfriends exactly what they want in bed, and how it's all political.
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  60. @German_reader

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of “homosexual” in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of “transgender” types reflects a similar process in that area.
     
    I hope it's really just due to indoctrination. Bad as that is, the alternative explanation - a real increase in homos and transgenders due to some environmental poison in plastics or something of the sort - is actually much scarier.

    And since we’re talking about homos and trannies:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/16/eurovision-winner-conchita-reveals-hiv-diagnosis?CMP=twt_gu

    So at least in this case poz has to be understood quite literally.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    While it’s whining about the cruel treatment meted out to it by an ex-boyfriend, it forgets to mention that it’s mostly normal people who pay for its treatment. While its illness is solely due to its own lifestyle choices, i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners. It’s a recipe for contracting STIs.
    , @Sean

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201803/the-moral-the-gender-fluid-flatworm-hold-the-hypodermic

    As I indicated in a recent post, it is now heresy in the eyes of many to claim that sex/gender and everything connected to it—notably behaviour and cognition—is biologically determined save for superficial, surgically-reversible details of anatomy. But heretical or not, Mother Nature has a lesson for us in some remarkable marine flat-worms where the issue of gender fluidity is concerned.[...]

    The result is epic penis-fencing battles in which each of a pair of worms fights to impregnate the other without being impregnated itself: a kind of rape contest, if you like, but with equally equipped contestants.
     
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  61. @German_reader
    And since we're talking about homos and trannies:
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/16/eurovision-winner-conchita-reveals-hiv-diagnosis?CMP=twt_gu
    So at least in this case poz has to be understood quite literally.

    While it’s whining about the cruel treatment meted out to it by an ex-boyfriend, it forgets to mention that it’s mostly normal people who pay for its treatment. While its illness is solely due to its own lifestyle choices, i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners. It’s a recipe for contracting STIs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners.

     

    Also lots of anal sex with its inherent riskiness.
    The unhealthiness of at least a certain kind of homo "lifestyle" and the resultant burden on the health care system is actually one of the best arguments against glamorization of homos imo.
    But we're living in societies where something like this Conchita freak is held up as an admirable role model and you're not supposed to notice this.
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  62. @reiner Tor
    While it’s whining about the cruel treatment meted out to it by an ex-boyfriend, it forgets to mention that it’s mostly normal people who pay for its treatment. While its illness is solely due to its own lifestyle choices, i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners. It’s a recipe for contracting STIs.

    i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners.

    Also lots of anal sex with its inherent riskiness.
    The unhealthiness of at least a certain kind of homo “lifestyle” and the resultant burden on the health care system is actually one of the best arguments against glamorization of homos imo.
    But we’re living in societies where something like this Conchita freak is held up as an admirable role model and you’re not supposed to notice this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    One of the really funny things in America is how many on the Left blame Reagan for AIDs. It is a really almost a mainstream thing - I actually heard him called "cold-hearted" in a documentary about the '80s on the History Channel, no contrary opinion allowed.

    It's really just amazing. They are blaming him for not curing a a single-stranded RNA virus. I don't know if it is a type of projection: they hate Reagan, so they blame AIDs on him, or whether he didn't emote enough, or set enough money aside, and that was what they really wanted.

    But, of course, gays should really blame themselves. It wasn't moderately different behavior that caused AIDs, but extreme Sodom and Gomorrah stuff. It may sound pretty harsh, but I really think it is a mistake to send those drugs to Africa. AIDs is actually something that could really move gene frequencies in the right direction, or at least change the culture.
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  63. songbird says:
    @reiner Tor
    It was mandatory in Hungary until 1989. Deeply unpopular. Totally useless, too, because it was impossible to visit the place. The occupying Soviet soldiers were also strictly separated from the population. Their living conditions were horrible, though the rumors about it were only confirmed after they left the country and people could see their barracks. So they weren’t looked up to, no one wanted to become anything like the Russians. Soviet was uncool.

    That’s interesting – I had never thought of that before – they never even had good opportunity to practice it. I knew there was a lot of horizontal integration in the economies of the Warsaw Pact, but I imagine not many negotiations.

    I believe there was a case in East Germany, where two kids were shot on the Soviet barracks, while trying to get scrap metal. That short of outcome makes mores sense with little interaction.

    I’ve always been really curious about the schools in the Eastern Bloc. Which ways they may have differed from the West, and which ways were they the same? Sort of thing. Did they have a pledge of allegiance? A flag or someone’s portrait? What sort of politics infiltrated or were in the textbooks? But a lot of that stuff seems to be too humdrum for an English-speaking audience, and I haven’t really come across any references to it, though I have read a lot of books on Communism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    In Poland:

    1. Russian was mandatory starting in fifth grade. If you were a gymnasium
    (college prep) graduate, it meant 7 years of Russian. However, at the four-year
    gymnasium (where the admission was extremely competitive, based on grades
    and entrance exams) you studied a second language, typically German, French,
    Latin or later English. Americans are often surprised to learn that English
    wasn't all that popular in Poland (or France or Italy) in the 1950s. English only
    became cool with the advent of rock 'n' roll in the late '50s. Elvis (and later the
    Beatles) did more for the popularity of English among teenagers than anyone else;

    2. Russian was typically taught poorly by hastily trained teachers. The study focused
    on grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary, etc. Colloquialisms and everyday
    expressions were almost completely absent. For example, I never even learned simple
    words like 'privet.' But then Russian is so easy if you are Polish that after 7 years I
    could read Russian texts without much difficulty. Speaking was a different matter.
    Most kids resented having to study Russian rather than one of the western languages
    (Russia has very little soft power, i.e., power to attract). In my case I didn't mind it
    since I'm multilingual and fascinated by foreign languages. Many people, for
    example, don't know that 500 years ago Polish and Russian were so close they were
    mutually comprehensible;

    3. History textbooks were not taken seriously by students. Everyone knew much of
    their contents was fake, and to learn what really happened you talked to your
    parents. On the other hand, math and science instruction was excellent;

    4. There was no Pledge of Allegiance or anything of that sort. Every Pole is a born rebel
    so that wouldn't be tolerated. We pretended to learn Marxism-Leninism, but in
    private we ridiculed Marx, and Lenin, and 'stupid godless Communism' (which
    was always called 'socialism'). The Catholic Church was the opposition party,
    and because of its strength the private sector was quite strong, and, unlike in
    the Soviet Union, the agriculture was left mostly in private hands.
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  64. @Thorfinnsson
    This, along with the whole "Q" (queer category). This allows attention-seeking girls and mentally ill degenerates the fun and "prestige" of sexual degeneracy and perversion without actually having to, you know, do anything.

    This allows people to be:

    -Genderqueer
    -Pansexual
    -Demisexual
    -Sapiosexual
    -Asexual (loser's retreat)

    and God knows what else.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing, but male homosexuals probably not as much. There are however propaganda efforts underway to encourage straight men to try great stuff on account of, uh, it not being gay?

    Part of the entire annoying “Queer” conquest to define every single behavior as a form of sexuality. Pretty much its impossible for them to go through any book, for example Anne of Green Gables, and not find proof that every female close friend is therefore evidence of lesbianism and pretty much any example of Mannerbund can probably turn into gay love after a “queer scholar.”

    Its retarded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @szopen
    heheh, I hear you. In Poland they called Maria Konopnicka lesbian because she, when was older, had close female friend. Another scholar argued the same about some famous Polish former boy scouts, fighting the Germans during the occupation (that they were gay, because they were so closed friends). I think also some retard argued Gandalf (from Lord of the Rings) was gay.
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  65. Sean says:

    Also this pattern of Poland being much gayer than the rest of the V4 continues.

    That is because they have a more feminine 2D:4D. Better looking women is the upside. Danish women are better looking than Finnish ones; the two extremes of prenatal testosteronisation. Simo Häyhä did more shooting than the entire Danish army

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    If true, 1) why and 2) wouldn't we see more autism associated with prenatal tetesterone?
    , @szopen
    I'd rather think it's the culture. Why the sexual orientation can't be a result of combination of your preference and environment allowing you to express your preference? E.g. some level of preference may result in a guy being gay when raised in one environment, while being hetero in other. So more gay-friendly environment would result in more gays.
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  66. m___ says:

    Keep it up Akarlin, imagine you are full-time at it, and allowed dinner every single day.

    Read More
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  67. Sean says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    No, they are not in the least comparable.

    Khodorkovsky was a thief and a parasite who fully deserved to be expropriated. Taking Yukos from him was not theft, but restoration. Quite apart from the minor fact of him plotting a pro-American coup.

    Telegram was a Russian product that was built from the group up without any assistance from the state. It was probably Russia's strongest tech brand after Yandex and Kaspersky. Its founder was not an American stooge. But he was out of Russia because he gave some siloviks the fingers.

    Khodorkovsky and Nevzlin were just businessmen with the acumen native to their race, except for the fact they had people shot, kidnapped never to be heard of again, and blown up. But there is no proof and why should they do anything so stupid and obvious. Must have been a frame up by America and Britain.

    Read More
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  68. @Sean

    Also this pattern of Poland being much gayer than the rest of the V4 continues.
     
    That is because they have a more feminine 2D:4D. Better looking women is the upside. Danish women are better looking than Finnish ones; the two extremes of prenatal testosteronisation. Simo Häyhä did more shooting than the entire Danish army

    If true, 1) why and 2) wouldn’t we see more autism associated with prenatal tetesterone?

    Read More
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  69. Dmitry says:

    There’s something unusual in Russia where gays are living very happily in current times, but are more modest about their lifestyle compared to in the West.

    At the same time, heterosexual celebrities like Nikolay Baskov and Kirkorov (well I guess heterosexuality of latter is more questionable) who are using brazenly their identity and fashion trends.

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  70. MarkinPNW says:
    @German_reader

    I recall asking an East German whether he was required to learn Russian
     
    The (admittedly few) East Germans I know did Russian at school. I know one family who left East Germany in the late 1980s before the wall came down, and iirc one of their daughters (who had been good at school in the GDR) had some problems in the West German school system because she'd only learned Russian, not English in the GDR.
    Wikipedia claims Russian was mandatory in the East German school system from 1949/50 onwards:
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schule_mit_erweitertem_Russischunterricht

    Russisch wurde seit dem Schuljahr 1949/50 als Sprache der osteuropäischen Führungsmacht Sowjetunion in allen DDR-Schulen ab dem 5. Schuljahr obligatorisch als erste Fremdsprache gelehrt
     
    = Russian was mandatory as first foreign language from the 5th school year onwards.
    Seems like English or French could be chosen as a 2nd foreign language later in one's school career.

    I remember a story told by the retired chief pilot of Lufthansa Airlines, Dieter Uchtdorf. He was from a family of Sudeten Germans who had to flee Czechoslovakia at the end of WW2 when he was just a toddler. The family settled in East Germany for several years where young Dieter learned Russian in school, and then the family moved to West Germany a few years before the Wall went up. Dieter reported how in their new home in West Germany, he had great trouble trying to learn English in contrast to his previously learning Russian, until he learned that English was required to become a pilot which was his childhood dream. Learning of that requirement apparently provided great motivation for him to learn the new, difficult language.

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  71. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    i.e. having lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners who in turn had lots of unprotected sex with multiple partners.

     

    Also lots of anal sex with its inherent riskiness.
    The unhealthiness of at least a certain kind of homo "lifestyle" and the resultant burden on the health care system is actually one of the best arguments against glamorization of homos imo.
    But we're living in societies where something like this Conchita freak is held up as an admirable role model and you're not supposed to notice this.

    One of the really funny things in America is how many on the Left blame Reagan for AIDs. It is a really almost a mainstream thing – I actually heard him called “cold-hearted” in a documentary about the ’80s on the History Channel, no contrary opinion allowed.

    It’s really just amazing. They are blaming him for not curing a a single-stranded RNA virus. I don’t know if it is a type of projection: they hate Reagan, so they blame AIDs on him, or whether he didn’t emote enough, or set enough money aside, and that was what they really wanted.

    But, of course, gays should really blame themselves. It wasn’t moderately different behavior that caused AIDs, but extreme Sodom and Gomorrah stuff. It may sound pretty harsh, but I really think it is a mistake to send those drugs to Africa. AIDs is actually something that could really move gene frequencies in the right direction, or at least change the culture.

    Read More
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  72. Sean says:
    @German_reader
    And since we're talking about homos and trannies:
    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/16/eurovision-winner-conchita-reveals-hiv-diagnosis?CMP=twt_gu
    So at least in this case poz has to be understood quite literally.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-imprinted-brain/201803/the-moral-the-gender-fluid-flatworm-hold-the-hypodermic

    As I indicated in a recent post, it is now heresy in the eyes of many to claim that sex/gender and everything connected to it—notably behaviour and cognition—is biologically determined save for superficial, surgically-reversible details of anatomy. But heretical or not, Mother Nature has a lesson for us in some remarkable marine flat-worms where the issue of gender fluidity is concerned.[...]

    The result is epic penis-fencing battles in which each of a pair of worms fights to impregnate the other without being impregnated itself: a kind of rape contest, if you like, but with equally equipped contestants.

    Read More
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  73. szopen says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Part of the entire annoying "Queer" conquest to define every single behavior as a form of sexuality. Pretty much its impossible for them to go through any book, for example Anne of Green Gables, and not find proof that every female close friend is therefore evidence of lesbianism and pretty much any example of Mannerbund can probably turn into gay love after a "queer scholar."

    Its retarded.

    heheh, I hear you. In Poland they called Maria Konopnicka lesbian because she, when was older, had close female friend. Another scholar argued the same about some famous Polish former boy scouts, fighting the Germans during the occupation (that they were gay, because they were so closed friends). I think also some retard argued Gandalf (from Lord of the Rings) was gay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William

    I think also some retard argued Gandalf (from Lord of the Rings) was gay.
     
    The actor who played him is gay. I think that is what the person you were talking to meant.
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  74. Mikhail says: • Website
    @LondonBob
    Right around the time Force 10 from Navarrone came out, that had a black guy parachuting in to Yugoslaviato meet up with partisans.

    Force 10 from Navarrone was filmed in Yugo and with a noticeable pro-Partizan/anti-Chetnik twist that distorts what actually happened.

    Read More
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  75. szopen says:
    @Sean

    Also this pattern of Poland being much gayer than the rest of the V4 continues.
     
    That is because they have a more feminine 2D:4D. Better looking women is the upside. Danish women are better looking than Finnish ones; the two extremes of prenatal testosteronisation. Simo Häyhä did more shooting than the entire Danish army

    I’d rather think it’s the culture. Why the sexual orientation can’t be a result of combination of your preference and environment allowing you to express your preference? E.g. some level of preference may result in a guy being gay when raised in one environment, while being hetero in other. So more gay-friendly environment would result in more gays.

    Read More
    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @AP
    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society. However, in a homophobic society, many gays would simply marry and have family lives, perhaps seeing other men on the side, or maybe never seeing other men and only fantasizing about them due to lack of access. Or live as confirmed bachelors.
    , @songbird
    According to stereotype, there is a stark clinal change somewhere along the line of the old Orient - I'm talking about the Middle East and possibly Greece. Maybe, it is more early farmer than hunter gather. Not just pederasty but animal abuse.

    When the US got involved in Afghanistan in the '80s, they found that the mules they supplied were being abused at a high rate. A Greek CIA guy (prob the only one at the time) said, being Greek, he understood the culture. As long as you are the doer - it is considered normal, or not very abhorrent. Of course, US allies abused many boys there.

    I don't know whether to trust him as a source, but Lawrence of Arabia wrote a lot about that sort of thing, not just among Arabs but also Turks. Jews are also stereotyped as having a high predilection elsewhere. See Berlin, before the Nazis came to power.

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  76. @szopen
    heheh, I hear you. In Poland they called Maria Konopnicka lesbian because she, when was older, had close female friend. Another scholar argued the same about some famous Polish former boy scouts, fighting the Germans during the occupation (that they were gay, because they were so closed friends). I think also some retard argued Gandalf (from Lord of the Rings) was gay.

    I think also some retard argued Gandalf (from Lord of the Rings) was gay.

    The actor who played him is gay. I think that is what the person you were talking to meant.

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  77. Jon0815 says:
    @Greasy William
    Conclusions:

    1. Russia won and it wasn't even close. The fact that the Russophiles (and even actual Russians like Anatoly) refuse to see that shows just how warped peoples brains are over all this nonsense.

    2. Assad is there forever and Russia is there forever.

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    I get that the Unz commetariat would have preferred WWIII but Putin is a President, not a dictator. His clique has no desire to see the destruction of the earth so Putin did the right thing: take the win and play the long game.

    4. Regardless of what Trump says, the US is never leaving. Or at least not until the US dissolves in 20 years. If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux. Magnier can write all the fan fiction he wants but Syria will never be whole again.

    5. The only reason the US launched this completely useless operation is because Trump had that Twitter meltdown. The strikes did nothing because they were designed to do nothing except for allow Trump's dumb ass to save some face. The next time Assad uses gas, there will be no US response. Trump has learned his lesson.

    6. Turkey supporting the US strikes cannot be seen as anything other than a huge diplomatic failure for Russia and a demonstration of just how fantastical the Saker/Magnier dream of Turkish/Russian alliance is. Erdogan is a delusional neo-Ottoman and he has no interest in being Putin's junior partner.

    7. 2020 is a long time away but Trump is headed towards re-election the same way he was last week. Russophiles live in a dream world where anymore than a handful of Americans care about Syria or Assad. "America First" meant anti immigration, anti trade and anti regime change. It never meant anti air strikes or anti police actions because Americans, even Trump voters, simply do not care about those things and nothing will ever change that. The Spencer, Duke, Ramzpaul and Cernovich types can say that they are taking their ball and going home but they said the exact same thing last year and such types account for maybe 10k total votes nationwide, and I'm being extremely generous with that number.

    Let me put it this way: if the US had proportional representation, a pro Syria party would not even get 0.5% of the vote.

    Nobody cares about Syria! Own your irrelevance.

    8. Lost in the commotion over these meaningless US air strikes is that Israel has launched yet another attack inside Syria on an Iranian base. That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    The devastating Iranian response should be coming shortly.

    9. The Russophiles are really excited about word out our eternal, undivided capitol of Jerusalem that we have some concerns about the s-300. This is typical of the way that Russophile's just don't get Israeli politics:

    A. Israel complains every time any of it's enemies get any weapons. They went crazy when the US sold Saudi Arabia AWACS in the 80s, much more so then they are upset about the s-300s. They screamed bloody murder about Russia replenishing Assad Sr.'s SA-6's in the late 70's before the IAF effortless destroyed all of them in the 82 war. Israeli's just love to complain. Don't read too much into it.

    B. Russia has a history of jerking it's clients around when it comes to the s-300. They promise to sell it and then they never do. Doesn't happen always but it happens frequently and it will probably happen here.

    C. The IAF is well equipped to handle the s-300 and s-400. They've been drilling extensively against both systems for years. If Syria gets the s-300, and it probably wont', Israel will destroy it with the loss of few, if any, aircraft.

    ...

    So all in all, things are looking pretty good: Trump cruising to reelection, no escalation between Russia and the US, Syria remains permanently divided and all out war between Israel on one side and Syria/Iran/Hezbollah on the other is closer then ever.

    I ask again: what's not to like?

    If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux.

    The USA has around 2000 troops in all of Syria. The Wagner incident involved only around 500 pro-government fighters, who had no SAMs to defend against close air support, and who seem to have been taken by surprise. The liberation of East Ghouta has freed up about 25,000 Syrian troops, while defeat of the remaining rebels in Idlib and elsewhere will free up tens of thousands more. No amount of airstrikes can stop 25,000-50,000 Syrian troops from overrunning the already outnumbered SDF at the al-Omar oilfields in hours.

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  78. AP says:
    @szopen
    I'd rather think it's the culture. Why the sexual orientation can't be a result of combination of your preference and environment allowing you to express your preference? E.g. some level of preference may result in a guy being gay when raised in one environment, while being hetero in other. So more gay-friendly environment would result in more gays.

    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society. However, in a homophobic society, many gays would simply marry and have family lives, perhaps seeing other men on the side, or maybe never seeing other men and only fantasizing about them due to lack of access. Or live as confirmed bachelors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polish Perspective
    By the way, welcome back man :) I was wondering if you had just quit or whatever, but it seems you were just busy. You're one of my favorite commenters here. BTW, I'm thinking about going to Moscow later this summer. Would you be kind to write some few choice words for those of us who are coming for the first time, what to think about (which isn't obvious and/or is non-standard advice), what parts to see, where to stay cheaply but still in a decent location etc.
    , @Swedish Family

    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society.
     
    This is a common argument, but I'm yet to hear a good explanation of how this explains buggery among sailors and prison inmates. Are they all secretly attracted to their own sex? Or does the lack of women make their libido "think outside the box," so to speak? My gay friends obviously support the former explanation, but I find it a little facile.
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  79. songbird says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    I'm curious why you think that safe tap water availability for residential use is such a marker? My family has history with environmental engineering so I'm slightly more familiar with it, but its a pretty huge investment at this moment for China for something that has fairly minimal benefit. Water pollution, as a whole, is a major issue due to agricultural concerns. But residential use in China is mostly bottled or with home systems like this one for the adequately paranoid.

    To actually get safe residential tap water requires pure water at the purification plant, something that China is indeed working and does get a lot of money into it - China is trying to upscale this to football sized field from what I heard. Expected completion around 2020(? - something like that, I need to ask my father). But that's not enough to get residential tap water - you also need to control for pipes into the residences and that's probably something that's far too expensive to accomplish at the moment for not really that much gain.

    It’s expensive, sure, and, probably, not a priority, or something to rush. It involves a lot of engineering and planning, and China probably has extra hurdles that the US didn’t have. The US had a lot of open land near cities, and wealthy people with large estates near lakes and ponds who made bequests. None of its cities were as populous, at the time and arguably they had nowhere near as many.

    Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying China can’t do it, but rather that you have arrived at first world status when you can drink the tap water and not before. It is probably the best single metric, other than per capita. It’s not just surface-level infrastructure, like roads and electricity, which are, of course, really important and can be complicated. It is essentially a ridiculous luxury for the public – something that even with the awesome engineering in ancient cities like Rome – never existed before the US.

    IMO, China will have really only arrived – exceeded the US – when you can go to practically any city and drink the water. Even if the per capita is still lower, it won’t matter – it will be meaningless. I’m not talking about the ability to project power, but lifestyle. That is what First World means to me. The USSR powerful as it was, was, of course, never First World.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Ah, I see what you mean. Thank you for explaining.
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  80. songbird says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    This, along with the whole "Q" (queer category). This allows attention-seeking girls and mentally ill degenerates the fun and "prestige" of sexual degeneracy and perversion without actually having to, you know, do anything.

    This allows people to be:

    -Genderqueer
    -Pansexual
    -Demisexual
    -Sapiosexual
    -Asexual (loser's retreat)

    and God knows what else.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing, but male homosexuals probably not as much. There are however propaganda efforts underway to encourage straight men to try great stuff on account of, uh, it not being gay?

    I agree: lesbians are increasing.

    I think women don’t have the same natural disgust for the same sex as most men do. Women have a greater need for companionship and, if the right man doesn’t come along, I think any with a little mustache will turn. The amount of true lesbians – hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them – is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.

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    • Replies: @Swedish Family

    The amount of true lesbians – hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them – is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.
     
    My experience is that true butch lesbians -- easily recognized by their lack of sexual dimorphism, think Rachel Maddow -- are very obviously uninterested in men. Lipsticks are another matter, of course.
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  81. Sina Weibo has removed the word "gay" from a censorship notice after mass outcry over the way the directive cast gay content as being similarly vulgar to porn and violent content https://t.co/SsKln5mxzR— Christian 马思潭 (@cdcshepherd) 16 april 2018

    Seems like ‘based Xi’ backtracked. Not surprising, if you’re aware of the underlying trends in China:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/02/27/chinas-new-multibillion-dollar-target-market-lgbt-youth/

    Social conservatism may be common among Xi’s generation, but not really for those under the age of 40, especially in cities. In this sense, China is not an exception.

    Poland much gayer than the rest of the V4

    As it happens, I personally don’t care about gay marriage as an issue. Nevertheless, blatant falsehoods deserve to be answered.

    Unless my eyes deceive me, gay marriage support is far greater in Czechia than in Poland.

    I’m fairly sure you’re aware of this AK, which makes your comment all the more curious. So why would you spread obvious lies?

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won't actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it'll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.

    Gays(and women) remain a potent force for bioleninism in any state, and the better the living standard, the more that they will agitate.
    , @Mitleser

    Seems like ‘based Xi’ backtracked.
     
    That is like blaming Putin everything in Russia.

    https://twitter.com/sam_siruomu/status/985754839895310337
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    It's a joke, calm down.

    Also I don't care overly much about it either. But the big gap between Poland or Hungary is strange, no?
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  82. @AP
    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society. However, in a homophobic society, many gays would simply marry and have family lives, perhaps seeing other men on the side, or maybe never seeing other men and only fantasizing about them due to lack of access. Or live as confirmed bachelors.

    By the way, welcome back man :) I was wondering if you had just quit or whatever, but it seems you were just busy. You’re one of my favorite commenters here. BTW, I’m thinking about going to Moscow later this summer. Would you be kind to write some few choice words for those of us who are coming for the first time, what to think about (which isn’t obvious and/or is non-standard advice), what parts to see, where to stay cheaply but still in a decent location etc.

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    • Replies: @AP
    Thank you for the kind words!

    BTW, I’m thinking about going to Moscow later this summer. Would you be kind to write some few choice words for those of us who are coming for the first time, what to think about (which isn’t obvious and/or is non-standard advice), what parts to see, where to stay cheaply but still in a decent location etc.
     
    Moscow is simply wonderful to walk around in, to appreciate the streetscapes and the beautiful women. Much of the central core has been pedestrianized. I would get off at the Mayakovska metro (most beautiful station in the world, perhaps) and walk down Tverskaya Ave to Red Square, then left on the first street. The area east of Tverskaya avenue and south of the boulevards has a lot of old Moscow streets. Tretyakov Gallery has traditional Russian art and is an absolute must. Moscow's theater scene is easily on the level of London's or New York's so if you speak Russian it is also a must. Seeing the metro stations would be fun. Outside the center, the region around MGU (and the campus itself) are nice. AK can provide many more recommendations.

    Perhaps because of sanctions, accommodations have become cheap. I imagine Moscow will not be cheap during the world cup, however. I would recommend staying anywhere within the Brown Line of the metro (which forms a loop around the central core), but not near a railway station. Moscow sprawls and you wouldn't want to be in a place where you have to spend 40 minutes or more on the subway to get anywhere.

    I'm in my 40s so I can't help you with nightlife tips - my nightlife consists of spending hours talking (political discussions on unz are kind of an attempt to get some of that magic), eating and drinking with old friends in their flats. And going out to a theater No more all-night rave parties as in the early 90s.
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  83. AP says:

    I got the opportunity to meet up with commenter AP this week. Had a very pleasant conversation with him, if a pretty short one as was necessitated by his busy schedule.

    Likewise. I am back in the states, having left Paradise.

    Overall impression has been very positive. Moscow continues to improve. Sobyanin has done an excellent job, and no Muscovite I talked to had complaints about him, despite some having been suspicious at first because he was not a native. City is very clean, very safe, full of life. Decorations for Easter were very pretty.

    Theater was excellent, as always.

    Food was very good, though I tended to eat at home with family and friends.

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s, works in what I’ll vaguely describe as law enforcement, got into a management position, and now with his meager official government salary owns 2 Moscow flats, a dacha, and a summer home on the Black Sea. A very inspiring rags to riches story of the Putin era. He is a huge fan of VV.

    My closest friends voted for Titov. Not because they liked him, but they disliked everyone else more.

    I saw very few Caucasians in the city center, and outside the center on the north side. But, many more Central Asians. This is an improvement. No skinheads or expressions of Nazism, also an improvement. My aunt (totally different branch of the family), daughter of a very well-known Soviet actor whom I won’t name, recently took the Metro for the first time in 30 years. She went very early, in order to avoid crowds and noticed that she and her friend were the only Russians on the car – everyone else was a Tadjik. Her comment – “where was I, Paris or something?”

    Minor complaint: more Muscovites are casually dressed and informal than they used to be. Many more jeans and sneakers. Previously Moscow had defied this Western trend and its people looked proudly Mad Men well-dressed and formal. They aren’t wearing pajamas in public yet, but it is a decline.

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    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <-- that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!

    I don't get why Karlin would like this post. But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.
    , @The Big Red Scary

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s
     
    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.

    Nobody I know actually likes Putin, but the reasons vary from the totally absurd to the completely reasonable.

    I don’t know much about Titov, and probably wouldn’t like that type in another country, but I do think that Russia in particular really does need more and better business.
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  84. @Polish Perspective

    Sina Weibo has removed the word "gay" from a censorship notice after mass outcry over the way the directive cast gay content as being similarly vulgar to porn and violent content https://t.co/SsKln5mxzR— Christian 马思潭 (@cdcshepherd) 16 april 2018
     
    Seems like 'based Xi' backtracked. Not surprising, if you're aware of the underlying trends in China:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/02/27/chinas-new-multibillion-dollar-target-market-lgbt-youth/

    Social conservatism may be common among Xi's generation, but not really for those under the age of 40, especially in cities. In this sense, China is not an exception.

    Poland much gayer than the rest of the V4
     
    As it happens, I personally don't care about gay marriage as an issue. Nevertheless, blatant falsehoods deserve to be answered.


    https://i.imgur.com/MHpZfJh.png

    Unless my eyes deceive me, gay marriage support is far greater in Czechia than in Poland.

    I'm fairly sure you're aware of this AK, which makes your comment all the more curious. So why would you spread obvious lies?

    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won’t actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it’ll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.

    Gays(and women) remain a potent force for bioleninism in any state, and the better the living standard, the more that they will agitate.

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    • Replies: @Polish Perspective

    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won’t actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it’ll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.
     
    I've come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.

    I was very impressed when I read a survey a few months ago about the greatest public worries, ranked in order for different countries. Most countries had entries that you'd expect: health care, employment, environment etc. China was the single one which had "moral decline" as a top worry among the public. That in of itself makes me hopeful that it will resist the decline that has now completely submerged the West and which looks inevitable in the Eastern part of Europe, as well.

    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There's also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn't for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there's the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let's hope it stays that way.
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  85. @songbird
    It's expensive, sure, and, probably, not a priority, or something to rush. It involves a lot of engineering and planning, and China probably has extra hurdles that the US didn't have. The US had a lot of open land near cities, and wealthy people with large estates near lakes and ponds who made bequests. None of its cities were as populous, at the time and arguably they had nowhere near as many.

    Don't misunderstand me. I'm not saying China can't do it, but rather that you have arrived at first world status when you can drink the tap water and not before. It is probably the best single metric, other than per capita. It's not just surface-level infrastructure, like roads and electricity, which are, of course, really important and can be complicated. It is essentially a ridiculous luxury for the public - something that even with the awesome engineering in ancient cities like Rome - never existed before the US.

    IMO, China will have really only arrived - exceeded the US - when you can go to practically any city and drink the water. Even if the per capita is still lower, it won't matter - it will be meaningless. I'm not talking about the ability to project power, but lifestyle. That is what First World means to me. The USSR powerful as it was, was, of course, never First World.

    Ah, I see what you mean. Thank you for explaining.

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  86. Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying China can’t do it, but rather that you have arrived at first world status when you can drink the tap water and not before. It is probably the best single metric, other than per capita. It’s not just surface-level infrastructure, like roads and electricity, which are, of course, really important and can be complicated. It is essentially a ridiculous luxury for the public – something that even with the awesome engineering in ancient cities like Rome – never existed before the US.

    What makes you think that? The first waterworks in Stockholm, built in 1861, provided eminently drinkable tap water, and most of its building materials were sourced from Great Britain.

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    • Replies: @songbird
    Europe and Britain in particular had some really amazing engineering, but I'm talking about something different - the scale and treatment. Chlorine and fluoridation. Sewage treatment. Water traveling a hundred miles in underground pipes by gravity. Something that happens in many locations across massive distances, not just in one or two cities.

    Something on the individual level like Boston. The Quabbin Reservoir is like a 100 miles from Boston. That was built starting in the 1930s. Not with channels or streams but underground pipes. The Deer Island treatment plant - treats sewage, then sends it 10 miles out to sea in a pipe under the ocean. of course, that was built much later. There were certainly may earlier systems with long distances like NYC, and I'm sure you could drink the water in Boston and other locations (lead pipes, of course) along time before the Quabbin was built.

    I don't how comparable any of that is - I'd guess you can certainly drink the water in Western Europe, and I'd definitely consider it first world now and decades in the past. In some cases, I think they have superior technology - ozone instead of chlorine. Maybe, the evolution of it was concurrent in some places, but the precedent isn't really that important to my argument. I'm talking about what makes the first world different, not necessarily the US, though obviously the US is a better comparison point for China because of scale.
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  87. songbird says:
    @LondonBob
    Right around the time Force 10 from Navarrone came out, that had a black guy parachuting in to Yugoslaviato meet up with partisans.

    The black guy (Carl Weathers) was really funny. Of course, he has some racially charged scenes with the non-Communists. Hollywood writers!

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  88. @AP
    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society. However, in a homophobic society, many gays would simply marry and have family lives, perhaps seeing other men on the side, or maybe never seeing other men and only fantasizing about them due to lack of access. Or live as confirmed bachelors.

    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society.

    This is a common argument, but I’m yet to hear a good explanation of how this explains buggery among sailors and prison inmates. Are they all secretly attracted to their own sex? Or does the lack of women make their libido “think outside the box,” so to speak? My gay friends obviously support the former explanation, but I find it a little facile.

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    • Replies: @AP

    This is a common argument, but I’m yet to hear a good explanation of how this explains buggery among sailors and prison inmates.
     
    Those guys only do this because women are not available and they want a hole. I suspect they think of women while doing it. It's why gays in traditional societies often get married and have sex with their wives.
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  89. Talha says:
    @Randal

    I don’t know, would you claim that you enjoy being anally penetrated by other men, just because our overlords in the media and politics have declared it to be wonderful?
    Feels kind of degrading to me.
     
    Surely the whole point is that an awful lot of elite effort has been expended over the past few decades to propagandise people into not feeling that way about the idea (at least) of homosexuality. Largely, in the US sphere media, it's systematically depicted as a condition (and as hugely fashionable and attractive, involving as it does status raising victimhood nobility) rather than with any focus on the actual behaviour involved.

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of "homosexual" in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of "transgender" types reflects a similar process in that area. The results will be a lot of tragically messed up people a decade or two down the line, it seems to me.

    Say what you want about Africans, but they don’t have ridiculous public debates about stuff like this:

    They know when to call it out (2:30 – LOOOL!):

    They definitely don’t want “eatin’ da poo poo” to be normalized:

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    • Replies: @Mitleser
    And more and more of the world population is African.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Well, there are some advantages to low living standards(and the mentalities that create them), but on the other hand, low living standards.
    , @German_reader
    Their sexual morality is pretty rotten though, AIDS is widespread in African countries for a reason after all.
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  90. @songbird
    I agree: lesbians are increasing.

    I think women don't have the same natural disgust for the same sex as most men do. Women have a greater need for companionship and, if the right man doesn't come along, I think any with a little mustache will turn. The amount of true lesbians - hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them - is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.

    The amount of true lesbians – hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them – is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.

    My experience is that true butch lesbians — easily recognized by their lack of sexual dimorphism, think Rachel Maddow — are very obviously uninterested in men. Lipsticks are another matter, of course.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing
     
    I imagine a lot of them are non-practising lesbians. In fact the majority of lesbians are probably non-practising lesbians. Lesbians aren't into sex. They prefer other leisure activities, like emotional game-playing.
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  91. AP says:
    @Polish Perspective
    By the way, welcome back man :) I was wondering if you had just quit or whatever, but it seems you were just busy. You're one of my favorite commenters here. BTW, I'm thinking about going to Moscow later this summer. Would you be kind to write some few choice words for those of us who are coming for the first time, what to think about (which isn't obvious and/or is non-standard advice), what parts to see, where to stay cheaply but still in a decent location etc.

    Thank you for the kind words!

    BTW, I’m thinking about going to Moscow later this summer. Would you be kind to write some few choice words for those of us who are coming for the first time, what to think about (which isn’t obvious and/or is non-standard advice), what parts to see, where to stay cheaply but still in a decent location etc.

    Moscow is simply wonderful to walk around in, to appreciate the streetscapes and the beautiful women. Much of the central core has been pedestrianized. I would get off at the Mayakovska metro (most beautiful station in the world, perhaps) and walk down Tverskaya Ave to Red Square, then left on the first street. The area east of Tverskaya avenue and south of the boulevards has a lot of old Moscow streets. Tretyakov Gallery has traditional Russian art and is an absolute must. Moscow’s theater scene is easily on the level of London’s or New York’s so if you speak Russian it is also a must. Seeing the metro stations would be fun. Outside the center, the region around MGU (and the campus itself) are nice. AK can provide many more recommendations.

    Perhaps because of sanctions, accommodations have become cheap. I imagine Moscow will not be cheap during the world cup, however. I would recommend staying anywhere within the Brown Line of the metro (which forms a loop around the central core), but not near a railway station. Moscow sprawls and you wouldn’t want to be in a place where you have to spend 40 minutes or more on the subway to get anywhere.

    I’m in my 40s so I can’t help you with nightlife tips – my nightlife consists of spending hours talking (political discussions on unz are kind of an attempt to get some of that magic), eating and drinking with old friends in their flats. And going out to a theater No more all-night rave parties as in the early 90s.

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  92. songbird says:
    @Swedish Family

    Don’t misunderstand me. I’m not saying China can’t do it, but rather that you have arrived at first world status when you can drink the tap water and not before. It is probably the best single metric, other than per capita. It’s not just surface-level infrastructure, like roads and electricity, which are, of course, really important and can be complicated. It is essentially a ridiculous luxury for the public – something that even with the awesome engineering in ancient cities like Rome – never existed before the US.
     
    What makes you think that? The first waterworks in Stockholm, built in 1861, provided eminently drinkable tap water, and most of its building materials were sourced from Great Britain.

    Europe and Britain in particular had some really amazing engineering, but I’m talking about something different – the scale and treatment. Chlorine and fluoridation. Sewage treatment. Water traveling a hundred miles in underground pipes by gravity. Something that happens in many locations across massive distances, not just in one or two cities.

    Something on the individual level like Boston. The Quabbin Reservoir is like a 100 miles from Boston. That was built starting in the 1930s. Not with channels or streams but underground pipes. The Deer Island treatment plant – treats sewage, then sends it 10 miles out to sea in a pipe under the ocean. of course, that was built much later. There were certainly may earlier systems with long distances like NYC, and I’m sure you could drink the water in Boston and other locations (lead pipes, of course) along time before the Quabbin was built.

    I don’t how comparable any of that is – I’d guess you can certainly drink the water in Western Europe, and I’d definitely consider it first world now and decades in the past. In some cases, I think they have superior technology – ozone instead of chlorine. Maybe, the evolution of it was concurrent in some places, but the precedent isn’t really that important to my argument. I’m talking about what makes the first world different, not necessarily the US, though obviously the US is a better comparison point for China because of scale.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    In Poland tap water was perfectly drinkable, generally starting in the late
    1950s, once the country largely rebuilt itself after the war
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  93. AP says:
    @Swedish Family

    Because homosexuality in men is biological (and likely caused by a combination of genetic predisposition and some sort of illness or virus during pregnancy) the number of homosexuals (men attracted to men) would not vary based on society.
     
    This is a common argument, but I'm yet to hear a good explanation of how this explains buggery among sailors and prison inmates. Are they all secretly attracted to their own sex? Or does the lack of women make their libido "think outside the box," so to speak? My gay friends obviously support the former explanation, but I find it a little facile.

    This is a common argument, but I’m yet to hear a good explanation of how this explains buggery among sailors and prison inmates.

    Those guys only do this because women are not available and they want a hole. I suspect they think of women while doing it. It’s why gays in traditional societies often get married and have sex with their wives.

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  94. @Daniel Chieh
    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won't actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it'll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.

    Gays(and women) remain a potent force for bioleninism in any state, and the better the living standard, the more that they will agitate.

    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won’t actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it’ll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.

    I’ve come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.

    I was very impressed when I read a survey a few months ago about the greatest public worries, ranked in order for different countries. Most countries had entries that you’d expect: health care, employment, environment etc. China was the single one which had “moral decline” as a top worry among the public. That in of itself makes me hopeful that it will resist the decline that has now completely submerged the West and which looks inevitable in the Eastern part of Europe, as well.

    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There’s also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn’t for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there’s the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let’s hope it stays that way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson


    I’ve come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.
     
    It's not just leftists in academia. It's also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    Liberal capitalism can't be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption. Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn't specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).

    And then there's the "liberal" part. E.g. the antebellum South had a free market, capitalist economy. It also had racially based slavery and "guardianship" laws for women.


    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There’s also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn’t for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there’s the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let’s hope it stays that way.
     
    India is proceeding down a negative path despite the current political success of the Hindu Nationalists.

    India is chock full of the sort of subversive Western liberast NGOs which China banned and Russia severely restricted (and now Hungary is as well). It's quite telling that normal Indians often refer to pozzed progressives as "NGO-types".

    The sexual revolution is still in a fairly embryonic stage in India, but cohabitation is now common enough that everyone is aware of it. Newspapers denounce cohabitation and "inter-community" romances still, but we'll see how long that last. More advanced is the mobilization of women into education and the workforce. You see very few Indian women in business so far, but half of new medical school graduates are women. Divorce is legal and ticking up, and I've even seen women who get married but do not take the name of their husbands.

    The real problem is the that the Indian elite is largely fluent in English and comfortable interacting with America and Great Britain. They therefore maintain closer links with the large Indian diaspora abroad than is the case with the Chinese, and this allows the continuous transmission of degenerate Western values into India.

    The Hindu Nationalists aren't addressing the problem. They're not even willing to repeal discriminatory laws against Hindu schools, let alone expel foreign NGOs.

    And if the growing influence of Western progressivism weren't bad enough, India suffers from an ever-increasing Mohammedan population. Mohammedans were 7% of the population in 1947, but today they are 17%. Indian law also permits polygamy for Mohammedans but not other religions.

    That said India is inherently the world's most reactionary civilization, and while most Brahmins are Congress supporters a fraction of them consider themselves the bearers of Indian culture and thus support Hindutva.

    Indian television and cinema mostly promote pride in Indian civilization as well, though there have been some pieces which mock religion. Indians tend to riot whenever this occurs.
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  95. iffen says:
    @Greasy William
    Conclusions:

    1. Russia won and it wasn't even close. The fact that the Russophiles (and even actual Russians like Anatoly) refuse to see that shows just how warped peoples brains are over all this nonsense.

    2. Assad is there forever and Russia is there forever.

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    I get that the Unz commetariat would have preferred WWIII but Putin is a President, not a dictator. His clique has no desire to see the destruction of the earth so Putin did the right thing: take the win and play the long game.

    4. Regardless of what Trump says, the US is never leaving. Or at least not until the US dissolves in 20 years. If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux. Magnier can write all the fan fiction he wants but Syria will never be whole again.

    5. The only reason the US launched this completely useless operation is because Trump had that Twitter meltdown. The strikes did nothing because they were designed to do nothing except for allow Trump's dumb ass to save some face. The next time Assad uses gas, there will be no US response. Trump has learned his lesson.

    6. Turkey supporting the US strikes cannot be seen as anything other than a huge diplomatic failure for Russia and a demonstration of just how fantastical the Saker/Magnier dream of Turkish/Russian alliance is. Erdogan is a delusional neo-Ottoman and he has no interest in being Putin's junior partner.

    7. 2020 is a long time away but Trump is headed towards re-election the same way he was last week. Russophiles live in a dream world where anymore than a handful of Americans care about Syria or Assad. "America First" meant anti immigration, anti trade and anti regime change. It never meant anti air strikes or anti police actions because Americans, even Trump voters, simply do not care about those things and nothing will ever change that. The Spencer, Duke, Ramzpaul and Cernovich types can say that they are taking their ball and going home but they said the exact same thing last year and such types account for maybe 10k total votes nationwide, and I'm being extremely generous with that number.

    Let me put it this way: if the US had proportional representation, a pro Syria party would not even get 0.5% of the vote.

    Nobody cares about Syria! Own your irrelevance.

    8. Lost in the commotion over these meaningless US air strikes is that Israel has launched yet another attack inside Syria on an Iranian base. That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    The devastating Iranian response should be coming shortly.

    9. The Russophiles are really excited about word out our eternal, undivided capitol of Jerusalem that we have some concerns about the s-300. This is typical of the way that Russophile's just don't get Israeli politics:

    A. Israel complains every time any of it's enemies get any weapons. They went crazy when the US sold Saudi Arabia AWACS in the 80s, much more so then they are upset about the s-300s. They screamed bloody murder about Russia replenishing Assad Sr.'s SA-6's in the late 70's before the IAF effortless destroyed all of them in the 82 war. Israeli's just love to complain. Don't read too much into it.

    B. Russia has a history of jerking it's clients around when it comes to the s-300. They promise to sell it and then they never do. Doesn't happen always but it happens frequently and it will probably happen here.

    C. The IAF is well equipped to handle the s-300 and s-400. They've been drilling extensively against both systems for years. If Syria gets the s-300, and it probably wont', Israel will destroy it with the loss of few, if any, aircraft.

    ...

    So all in all, things are looking pretty good: Trump cruising to reelection, no escalation between Russia and the US, Syria remains permanently divided and all out war between Israel on one side and Syria/Iran/Hezbollah on the other is closer then ever.

    I ask again: what's not to like?

    That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    I wish I could bring up those comments. I just can’t quite remember ….

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  96. Mitleser says:
    @Talha
    Say what you want about Africans, but they don't have ridiculous public debates about stuff like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjTG28W4jKw

    They know when to call it out (2:30 - LOOOL!):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFikhFtMvpc

    They definitely don't want "eatin' da poo poo" to be normalized:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjnrLt3VuSM

    And more and more of the world population is African.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Well, I guess "da poo poo" will be off the menu in an ever-increasing arc. We can't really help that homosexuals have prioritized the right to "eat da poo poo" rather than procreate - a right that they have right now.

    Kind of self-defeating - oh well...

    Peace.
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  97. @Talha
    Say what you want about Africans, but they don't have ridiculous public debates about stuff like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjTG28W4jKw

    They know when to call it out (2:30 - LOOOL!):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFikhFtMvpc

    They definitely don't want "eatin' da poo poo" to be normalized:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjnrLt3VuSM

    Well, there are some advantages to low living standards(and the mentalities that create them), but on the other hand, low living standards.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Yup - low living standards. I was discussing this with a brother recently. It's not necessarily that Africans have low living standards (well, they do in our age), rather certain other countries have living standards that are historically unheard of. For instance, an upper-middle class guy like me was put up in a normal hotel room by my company and I could adjust the temperature to within half a degree. When I go to the store to buy orange juice, I have not only multiple choices of brands but also which combo I want; orange with mango, strawberry, banana, etc. included - I just recently tasted some fruit I had never heard of before in my life. I can talk with my Mom right now if I want.

    None of the kings of Persia had anything close to this level of opulence. I would say it is unnatural. Part of being a human being are the historic struggles of being a human being. If you remove those, what happens...systemic failure? I don't know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.

    Peace.

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  98. Some whitepill news for me. 70% of youth support the right-wing parties, with a greater percentage supporting the more radical ones compared to the general public:

    http://www.rp.pl/Polityka/180419488-Sondaz-W-grupie-18-29-lat-Kaczynski-Korwin-i-Kukiz-maja-70-procent-poparcia.html

    For anyone wanting to read the story in more detail, Deepl.com has decent translation of Polish to English, I find it better than Google Translate. German engineering is impressive, indeed.

    This gels with my general observation that Poles are more left-leaning the higher up you go in the age brackets. The exception would only be those at 65 or older. But certainly the most liberal generation tend to be those in the 40-65 range and those are the people essentially in power. It’s quite telling that Kaczynski is over 65 and most of his deputies are either technocrats who were lured from the liberals (Morawiecki) or people long lost in the political wilderness.

    What surprised me was how well Wolność(“freedom”) fared, which is a libertarian party though one with a hard-right leader. Even among the general population, they get 4%(!). This is higher than even a supposedly libertarian society like the US ever managed to do. On feminism he goes much further than PiS ever dares to. On immigration he’s surprisingly non-crap for a libertarian. Wolność is good, because they disproportionate support from educated young men. Better have the smart young men be right-wing libertarians than bugmen. Also easier to convert at a later date.

    Korwin, the leader of Wolność, is also the most pro-Russian one, to the point of being accused of being a ‘Russian agent’. This also gels with my observation that pro-Russian sentiments rise substantially among the youth. According to the latest eurobarometer poll, while around 25-27% of Poles had favourable views of Russia, this rises to over 50% for those under 29.

    We basically have to hold out for maybe 15 years or so before we can have a real right-wing consolidation in Poland and not the bland nonsense PiS is offering at the moment.

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    • Replies: @utu
    It is sad to hear that libertarians are succeeding in Poland in turning brains of young males (girls usually have more common sense) into the scrambled eggs w/o ability to think straight. The "Libertarian Project" was quite successful in America in giving virtually all power to oligarchy making any grass root communitarian movements impossible. Though in the US this operation was much simpler because of the presence of Blacks. Any social program can be compromised and ridiculed as serving lazy Black only. The slavery is the gift that keeps on giving (to the slave owners). I am surprised that in the monoethnic and monocultural society of Poland people can fall for this blatant psyop that is against their own interest. Probably the Polish libertarians (young males who think they will be young and healthy forever and probably rich) are also against retirement pensions and universal medical care. They will get what they wish because that is what TPTB want just with a little help of useful idiots.
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  99. Anon 2 says:
    @songbird
    That's interesting - I had never thought of that before - they never even had good opportunity to practice it. I knew there was a lot of horizontal integration in the economies of the Warsaw Pact, but I imagine not many negotiations.

    I believe there was a case in East Germany, where two kids were shot on the Soviet barracks, while trying to get scrap metal. That short of outcome makes mores sense with little interaction.

    I've always been really curious about the schools in the Eastern Bloc. Which ways they may have differed from the West, and which ways were they the same? Sort of thing. Did they have a pledge of allegiance? A flag or someone's portrait? What sort of politics infiltrated or were in the textbooks? But a lot of that stuff seems to be too humdrum for an English-speaking audience, and I haven't really come across any references to it, though I have read a lot of books on Communism.

    In Poland:

    1. Russian was mandatory starting in fifth grade. If you were a gymnasium
    (college prep) graduate, it meant 7 years of Russian. However, at the four-year
    gymnasium (where the admission was extremely competitive, based on grades
    and entrance exams) you studied a second language, typically German, French,
    Latin or later English. Americans are often surprised to learn that English
    wasn’t all that popular in Poland (or France or Italy) in the 1950s. English only
    became cool with the advent of rock ‘n’ roll in the late ’50s. Elvis (and later the
    Beatles) did more for the popularity of English among teenagers than anyone else;

    2. Russian was typically taught poorly by hastily trained teachers. The study focused
    on grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary, etc. Colloquialisms and everyday
    expressions were almost completely absent. For example, I never even learned simple
    words like ‘privet.’ But then Russian is so easy if you are Polish that after 7 years I
    could read Russian texts without much difficulty. Speaking was a different matter.
    Most kids resented having to study Russian rather than one of the western languages
    (Russia has very little soft power, i.e., power to attract). In my case I didn’t mind it
    since I’m multilingual and fascinated by foreign languages. Many people, for
    example, don’t know that 500 years ago Polish and Russian were so close they were
    mutually comprehensible;

    3. History textbooks were not taken seriously by students. Everyone knew much of
    their contents was fake, and to learn what really happened you talked to your
    parents. On the other hand, math and science instruction was excellent;

    4. There was no Pledge of Allegiance or anything of that sort. Every Pole is a born rebel
    so that wouldn’t be tolerated. We pretended to learn Marxism-Leninism, but in
    private we ridiculed Marx, and Lenin, and ‘stupid godless Communism’ (which
    was always called ‘socialism’). The Catholic Church was the opposition party,
    and because of its strength the private sector was quite strong, and, unlike in
    the Soviet Union, the agriculture was left mostly in private hands.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Thanks for those insights!
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  100. Talha says:
    @Mitleser
    And more and more of the world population is African.

    Well, I guess “da poo poo” will be off the menu in an ever-increasing arc. We can’t really help that homosexuals have prioritized the right to “eat da poo poo” rather than procreate – a right that they have right now.

    Kind of self-defeating – oh well…

    Peace.

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  101. songbird says:
    @szopen
    I'd rather think it's the culture. Why the sexual orientation can't be a result of combination of your preference and environment allowing you to express your preference? E.g. some level of preference may result in a guy being gay when raised in one environment, while being hetero in other. So more gay-friendly environment would result in more gays.

    According to stereotype, there is a stark clinal change somewhere along the line of the old Orient – I’m talking about the Middle East and possibly Greece. Maybe, it is more early farmer than hunter gather. Not just pederasty but animal abuse.

    When the US got involved in Afghanistan in the ’80s, they found that the mules they supplied were being abused at a high rate. A Greek CIA guy (prob the only one at the time) said, being Greek, he understood the culture. As long as you are the doer – it is considered normal, or not very abhorrent. Of course, US allies abused many boys there.

    I don’t know whether to trust him as a source, but Lawrence of Arabia wrote a lot about that sort of thing, not just among Arabs but also Turks. Jews are also stereotyped as having a high predilection elsewhere. See Berlin, before the Nazis came to power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Jewish men are twice as likely to be homosexual.

    http://lukeford.net/blog/?p=88701
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  102. @Talha
    Say what you want about Africans, but they don't have ridiculous public debates about stuff like this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjTG28W4jKw

    They know when to call it out (2:30 - LOOOL!):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MFikhFtMvpc

    They definitely don't want "eatin' da poo poo" to be normalized:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjnrLt3VuSM

    Their sexual morality is pretty rotten though, AIDS is widespread in African countries for a reason after all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    And some astoundingly bad ideas:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_cleansing_myth


    Anthropologist Suzanne Leclerc-Madlala says the myth is a potential factor in infant rape by HIV-positive men in South Africa.[2] In addition to young girls, who are presumed to be virgins because of their age, people who are "blind, deaf, physically impaired, intellectually disabled, or who have mental-health disabilities" are sometimes raped under the erroneous presumption that individuals with disabilities are sexually inactive and therefore virgins.
     
    , @Talha
    Yup - simply stopping "da poo poo" is not a catch-all remedy. Gotta get other stuff in control as well. If you don't stop that, then you will also take yourself out of the gene-pool.

    Peace.
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  103. songbird says:
    @Anon 2
    In Poland:

    1. Russian was mandatory starting in fifth grade. If you were a gymnasium
    (college prep) graduate, it meant 7 years of Russian. However, at the four-year
    gymnasium (where the admission was extremely competitive, based on grades
    and entrance exams) you studied a second language, typically German, French,
    Latin or later English. Americans are often surprised to learn that English
    wasn't all that popular in Poland (or France or Italy) in the 1950s. English only
    became cool with the advent of rock 'n' roll in the late '50s. Elvis (and later the
    Beatles) did more for the popularity of English among teenagers than anyone else;

    2. Russian was typically taught poorly by hastily trained teachers. The study focused
    on grammar, reading comprehension, vocabulary, etc. Colloquialisms and everyday
    expressions were almost completely absent. For example, I never even learned simple
    words like 'privet.' But then Russian is so easy if you are Polish that after 7 years I
    could read Russian texts without much difficulty. Speaking was a different matter.
    Most kids resented having to study Russian rather than one of the western languages
    (Russia has very little soft power, i.e., power to attract). In my case I didn't mind it
    since I'm multilingual and fascinated by foreign languages. Many people, for
    example, don't know that 500 years ago Polish and Russian were so close they were
    mutually comprehensible;

    3. History textbooks were not taken seriously by students. Everyone knew much of
    their contents was fake, and to learn what really happened you talked to your
    parents. On the other hand, math and science instruction was excellent;

    4. There was no Pledge of Allegiance or anything of that sort. Every Pole is a born rebel
    so that wouldn't be tolerated. We pretended to learn Marxism-Leninism, but in
    private we ridiculed Marx, and Lenin, and 'stupid godless Communism' (which
    was always called 'socialism'). The Catholic Church was the opposition party,
    and because of its strength the private sector was quite strong, and, unlike in
    the Soviet Union, the agriculture was left mostly in private hands.

    Thanks for those insights!

    Read More
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  104. @German_reader
    Their sexual morality is pretty rotten though, AIDS is widespread in African countries for a reason after all.

    And some astoundingly bad ideas:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_cleansing_myth

    Anthropologist Suzanne Leclerc-Madlala says the myth is a potential factor in infant rape by HIV-positive men in South Africa.[2] In addition to young girls, who are presumed to be virgins because of their age, people who are “blind, deaf, physically impaired, intellectually disabled, or who have mental-health disabilities” are sometimes raped under the erroneous presumption that individuals with disabilities are sexually inactive and therefore virgins.

    Read More
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  105. Talha says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Well, there are some advantages to low living standards(and the mentalities that create them), but on the other hand, low living standards.

    Yup – low living standards. I was discussing this with a brother recently. It’s not necessarily that Africans have low living standards (well, they do in our age), rather certain other countries have living standards that are historically unheard of. For instance, an upper-middle class guy like me was put up in a normal hotel room by my company and I could adjust the temperature to within half a degree. When I go to the store to buy orange juice, I have not only multiple choices of brands but also which combo I want; orange with mango, strawberry, banana, etc. included – I just recently tasted some fruit I had never heard of before in my life. I can talk with my Mom right now if I want.

    None of the kings of Persia had anything close to this level of opulence. I would say it is unnatural. Part of being a human being are the historic struggles of being a human being. If you remove those, what happens…systemic failure? I don’t know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.

    Peace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Big Red Scary

    I don’t know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.
     
    Even my opulent American childhood looks poor compared to that of kids these days. Sometimes I waited a month until I got new shoes or a new coat. And I had to wait until Saturday morning to get my fill of cartoons. Now you point and click. Shoes and a coat are delivered in a box the next day, and any cartoon you want starts streaming.

    In my family, right now, I see only three checks on ego and appetite: 1) Orthodox Christian periods of fasting (similar to vegan diet, two days most weeks, and between two weeks and a month a few times a year), 2) living together as a family (to me, this is a big check on ego and appetite, since I have to constantly consider what my family needs rather than what I want), and 3) grit (we each have things that we want to accomplish and which require us to abstain from other things). So far, this keeps us from going completely off the rails. But I’m uncertain that it is enough, and I’m concerned about future generations. Already I am a grumpy old man, it seems...
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  106. Talha says:
    @German_reader
    Their sexual morality is pretty rotten though, AIDS is widespread in African countries for a reason after all.

    Yup – simply stopping “da poo poo” is not a catch-all remedy. Gotta get other stuff in control as well. If you don’t stop that, then you will also take yourself out of the gene-pool.

    Peace.

    Read More
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  107. Anon 2 says:
    @German_reader

    The hugely increased numbers willing to claim the title of “homosexual” in its various forms reflects the widespread (but not complete) success of that indoctrination, just as the absurd increase in the number of “transgender” types reflects a similar process in that area.
     
    I hope it's really just due to indoctrination. Bad as that is, the alternative explanation - a real increase in homos and transgenders due to some environmental poison in plastics or something of the sort - is actually much scarier.

    I suspect, as someone had already pointed out, that the high percentage
    of the LGBTs in the U.S. is mostly due to the women declaring themselves
    bisexual. It’s a standard joke, at least in the United States, that every
    female college student will experiment with lesbianism at some point.
    Many admit to being bi-curious. I have personally known at least 3
    students who went through a lesbian phase. It’s a splendid way to
    avoid pregnancy while getting your jollies and emotional support as well.
    One now lives in a liberal whitopia where you get a lot of brownie points
    for declaring solidarity with the LGBTs. I know for a fact she loves to
    have sex with men … because she told me so. She is one of those young
    women who will bend your ear talking about their orgasms, why they take
    so long, why they are sometimes painful, and why women should tell
    their boyfriends exactly what they want in bed, and how it’s all political.

    Read More
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  108. can you guys please never cite or talk about that “poo poo” thing again? I had forgotten about it until you brought it back up.

    kthnxbye

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Hell no man - open thread...meaning...

    You get to talk about who you would or would not bang.

    We get to talk about "da poo poo" as needs be.

    Mr. Karlin can intervene as he wishes.

    Peace.
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  109. A Statement Issued by the Patriarchates of Antioch and all the East for the Greek Orthodox, Syrian Orthodox, and Greek-Melkite Catholic

    Damascus, 14 April 2018

    God is with us; Understand all ye nations and submit yourselves!

    We, the Patriarchs: John X, Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and all the East, Ignatius Aphrem II, Syrian Orthodox Patriarch of Antioch and all the East, and Joseph Absi, Melkite-Greek Catholic Patriarch of Antioch, Alexandria, and Jerusalem, condemn and denounce the brutal aggression that took place this morning against our precious country Syria by the USA, France and the UK, under the allegations that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons. We raise our voices to affirm the following:

    1. This brutal aggression is a clear violation of the international laws and the UN Charter, because it is an unjustified assault on a sovereign country, member of the UN.

    2. It causes us great pain that this assault comes from powerful countries to which Syria did not cause any harm in any way.

    3. The allegations of the USA and other countries that the Syrian army is using chemical weapons and that Syria is a country that owns and uses this kind of weapon, is a claim that is unjustified and unsupported by sufficient and clear evidence.

    4. The timing of this unjustified aggression against Syria, when the independent International Commission for Inquiry was about to start its work in Syria, undermines of the work of this commission.

    5. This brutal aggression destroys the chances for a peaceful political solution and leads to escalation and more complications.

    6. This unjust aggression encourages the terrorist organizations and gives them momentum to continue in their terrorism.

    7. We call upon the Security Council of the United Nations to play its natural role in bringing peace rather than contribute to escalation of wars.

    8. We call upon all churches in the countries that participated in the aggression, to fulfill their Christian duties, according to the teachings of the Gospel, and condemn this aggression and to call their governments to commit to the protection of international peace.

    9. We salute the courage, heroism and sacrifices of the Syrian Arab Army which courageously protects Syria and provide security for its people. We pray for the souls of the martyrs and the recovery of the wounded. We are confident that the army will not bow before the external or internal terrorist aggressions; they will continue to fight courageously against terrorism until every inch of the Syrian land is cleansed from terrorism. We, likewise, commend the brave stand of countries which are friendly to the Syria and its people.

    We offer our prayers for the safety, victory, and deliverance of Syria from all kinds of wars and terrorism. We also pray for peace in Syria and throughout the world, and call for strengthening the efforts of the national reconciliation for the sake of protecting the country and preserving the dignity of all Syrians.

    http://syriacpatriarchate.org/2018/04/a-statement-issued-by-the-patriarchates-of-antioch-and-all-the-east-for-the-greek-orthodox-syrian-orthodox-and-greek-melkite-catholic/

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  110. Mitleser says:
    @Polish Perspective

    Sina Weibo has removed the word "gay" from a censorship notice after mass outcry over the way the directive cast gay content as being similarly vulgar to porn and violent content https://t.co/SsKln5mxzR— Christian 马思潭 (@cdcshepherd) 16 april 2018
     
    Seems like 'based Xi' backtracked. Not surprising, if you're aware of the underlying trends in China:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/02/27/chinas-new-multibillion-dollar-target-market-lgbt-youth/

    Social conservatism may be common among Xi's generation, but not really for those under the age of 40, especially in cities. In this sense, China is not an exception.

    Poland much gayer than the rest of the V4
     
    As it happens, I personally don't care about gay marriage as an issue. Nevertheless, blatant falsehoods deserve to be answered.


    https://i.imgur.com/MHpZfJh.png

    Unless my eyes deceive me, gay marriage support is far greater in Czechia than in Poland.

    I'm fairly sure you're aware of this AK, which makes your comment all the more curious. So why would you spread obvious lies?

    Seems like ‘based Xi’ backtracked.

    That is like blaming Putin everything in Russia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    That said, the Chinese government really dislikes gay content so its not a jump to think that its coming from somewhere high.

    http://www.newsweek.com/revealed-worlds-most-unwelcoming-city-gay-people-probably-not-where-you-629597

    http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-media-says-supreme-court-gay-marriage-ruling-hype-will-induce-potential-1988087

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/14/world/asia/china-same-sex-marriage-ruling.html

    Its fairly evident that there's Party policy that considers the expansion of gays to be social damage, and damage must be mitigated however it is possible, within reason. From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.
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  111. Brabantian says: • Website

    AK’s puzzlement about items such as Putin just now crushing a Russian-founded IT platform company, Telegram (WhatsApp rival), and instead is sponsoring Israel’s Viber as the official Russia gov choice for ‘safe’ communication -

    Is much more easily explained, along with many other AK ‘riddles’, if one considers that Vladimir Putin is playing a role in an NWO New World Order game right alongside of Trump’s neo-cons

    Western stooge Yeltsin appointed Putin … It was perhaps Putin’s mission to build Russia up so it could be the ‘enemy’ again

    [MORE]

    Russia once again the ‘Best Enemy Money Can Buy’ as Antony Sutton showed was true of the old Soviet Union, getting US tech transferred to it thru Israel and other conduits, in the 1950s-60s-70s

    This explaining all the pulling of the punches by Putin, all the half-baked smoldering conflicts in so many broken up countries
    Moldova – Transnistria
    Georgia – Abkhazia – South Ossetia
    Armenia – Azerbaijan – Nagorno-Karabakh
    Ukraine – Donbass

    Not to mention Russia letting the UN destroy Libya, Russia approving ‘Iran sanctions’ over bullshite, no official Russian truthing about 9-11, or fake USA ‘moon landings’ of 50 years ago etc

    This also explains why Russian media such as RT are still quite wimpy about things, even despite ‘threats of WW3′ etc and what just happened in Syria

    About 20% of those Israeli soldiers shooting Palestinian children and protestors, are essentially Russians, many of them Christian Orthodox with an alleged ‘Jewish ancestor’

    Photo of Vladimir Putin and Jordan’s King Abdullah enjoying satanic freemason hand signals

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chuck

    Vladimir Putin is playing a role in an NWO New World Order game right alongside of Trump’s neo-cons
     
    Hush. Let the goys have their fun.
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  112. @Polish Perspective

    Yes, I suspect that while poz will be impeded in China, it won’t actually be stopped. Nonetheless, so as long as the government system works to essentially exclude gays, it’ll at least be hesitant from a poz-centric agenda.
     
    I've come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.

    I was very impressed when I read a survey a few months ago about the greatest public worries, ranked in order for different countries. Most countries had entries that you'd expect: health care, employment, environment etc. China was the single one which had "moral decline" as a top worry among the public. That in of itself makes me hopeful that it will resist the decline that has now completely submerged the West and which looks inevitable in the Eastern part of Europe, as well.

    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There's also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn't for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there's the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let's hope it stays that way.

    I’ve come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.

    It’s not just leftists in academia. It’s also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    Liberal capitalism can’t be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption. Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn’t specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).

    And then there’s the “liberal” part. E.g. the antebellum South had a free market, capitalist economy. It also had racially based slavery and “guardianship” laws for women.

    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There’s also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn’t for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there’s the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let’s hope it stays that way.

    India is proceeding down a negative path despite the current political success of the Hindu Nationalists.

    India is chock full of the sort of subversive Western liberast NGOs which China banned and Russia severely restricted (and now Hungary is as well). It’s quite telling that normal Indians often refer to pozzed progressives as “NGO-types”.

    The sexual revolution is still in a fairly embryonic stage in India, but cohabitation is now common enough that everyone is aware of it. Newspapers denounce cohabitation and “inter-community” romances still, but we’ll see how long that last. More advanced is the mobilization of women into education and the workforce. You see very few Indian women in business so far, but half of new medical school graduates are women. Divorce is legal and ticking up, and I’ve even seen women who get married but do not take the name of their husbands.

    The real problem is the that the Indian elite is largely fluent in English and comfortable interacting with America and Great Britain. They therefore maintain closer links with the large Indian diaspora abroad than is the case with the Chinese, and this allows the continuous transmission of degenerate Western values into India.

    The Hindu Nationalists aren’t addressing the problem. They’re not even willing to repeal discriminatory laws against Hindu schools, let alone expel foreign NGOs.

    And if the growing influence of Western progressivism weren’t bad enough, India suffers from an ever-increasing Mohammedan population. Mohammedans were 7% of the population in 1947, but today they are 17%. Indian law also permits polygamy for Mohammedans but not other religions.

    That said India is inherently the world’s most reactionary civilization, and while most Brahmins are Congress supporters a fraction of them consider themselves the bearers of Indian culture and thus support Hindutva.

    Indian television and cinema mostly promote pride in Indian civilization as well, though there have been some pieces which mock religion. Indians tend to riot whenever this occurs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha

    The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.
     
    This is what Eric Voegelin thought. That liberalism isn't really something completely alien, but that it is an older heresy within the Christian tradition - a Gnostic heresy:
    "Democracy as Gnosticism?

    Voegelin saw gnosticism all over the modern age. He even considered liberalism, constitutionalism, and “democratism” to be gnostic ideologies, and some of his students were extremely hard on John Locke, who had a sizeable influence on the American Founding....Voegelin never provided a complete catalogue, but one may say that among the gnostic ideologies with which we are faced every day are: progressivism, positivism, egalitarianism, Freudianism, Marxist and non-Marxist socialism, scientism, that civil libertarianism which follows in the footsteps of John Stuart Mill’s progressivism, that conservatism which seeks to “freeze” history at a particular point in time, feminism, pacifism, and idealism (as opposed to realism) in international politics. Some of these ideologies emphasize movement toward a goal rather than the nature of the goal pursued, progressivism being the best example, but they are still gnostic.

    There has, moreover, been a development in the last 25 years about which Voegelin remained silent even though it began already during his lifetime, namely, the emergence of gnosticism on a grand scale in the Christian Churches in the form of liberation theology and much of the peace-and-justice and liturgical-reform movements. "
    https://www.crisismagazine.com/1990/the-new-gnosticism-the-philosopher-eric-voegelin-finds-an-old-christian-heresy-to-be-very-much-alive

    Peace.

    , @Polish Perspective

    It’s not just leftists in academia. It’s also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.
     
    I would be careful with using 'leftist' in all those instances since there is now hyperinflation of the term. A lot of 'leftists' are really just socially liberal types, even if I agree that genuine leftists are overrepresented in all those places. But in the bureaucracy, in particular, I'd say neoliberals have dominance. But their social values are more or less identical with leftists. This is also why Antifa are protected by the media and the state in a way that right-wing nationalists, especially white nationalists, are not.

    Liberal capitalism can’t be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption.
     
    Which is why it is a harder foe to fight. Partly because the profit motive is stronger than any ideological conviction. Ideologies change; greed doesn't. Most people overestimate their own resistance to corruption. A high enough price will buy over the vast majority of people. You see it even on the right. Why do so many not engage in activism? Because they have a lot of material welfare to lose, in other words, it's a clever way of the system to keep you in check by having you invested in it and to rationalise your passivity by adopting incrementalist positions. In some ways this cowardice is rational. It's a high-risk with low outcome certainty to be a radical, but in my view, it is also the only way to ensure a change at this point. The system we live in is not negotiating, that should be clear by now. Trump was simply the latest confirmation of that, but this pattern is visible everywhere. FN threw their own founder under the bus, but when Marine wanted to march for Jews, they rejected her. Cucking never helps!

    Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn’t specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).
     
    You're assuming they don't drink their own poison. What makes you think they unironically don't believe their own bullshit about Tabula Rasa and the like? Why do you think libertarians in the US have drifted further and further to the left? The latter is a key part of why so many on the Alt-Right are former libertarians.

    Even beyond rapefugees, even if not a single one had come to Europe, it would not change my argument one iota, nor the underlying logic of capitalism of hunting for profit at every cost. This is the true dilemma, because it is a far more efficient system than its competitors, it has proved that over and over again.

    Yet capitalism without restraints - considerations such as keeping a country homogeneous is one - ensures perpetual tension between a genuinely radical right-wing and the economic system. What passes for 'right wing' in the West today is mostly just moderate liberals.

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  113. Talha says:
    @Greasy William
    can you guys please never cite or talk about that "poo poo" thing again? I had forgotten about it until you brought it back up.

    kthnxbye

    Hell no man – open thread…meaning…

    You get to talk about who you would or would not bang.

    We get to talk about “da poo poo” as needs be.

    Mr. Karlin can intervene as he wishes.

    Peace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    Agreed with Greasy, nobody wants these mental images, let's move on.
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  114. @Mitleser

    Seems like ‘based Xi’ backtracked.
     
    That is like blaming Putin everything in Russia.

    https://twitter.com/sam_siruomu/status/985754839895310337

    That said, the Chinese government really dislikes gay content so its not a jump to think that its coming from somewhere high.

    http://www.newsweek.com/revealed-worlds-most-unwelcoming-city-gay-people-probably-not-where-you-629597

    http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-media-says-supreme-court-gay-marriage-ruling-hype-will-induce-potential-1988087

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/14/world/asia/china-same-sex-marriage-ruling.html

    Its fairly evident that there’s Party policy that considers the expansion of gays to be social damage, and damage must be mitigated however it is possible, within reason. From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser

    From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.
     
    Just invest in artificial womb.
    With enough advanced tech, even gays should be able to have biological children.
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  115. utu says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Some whitepill news for me. 70% of youth support the right-wing parties, with a greater percentage supporting the more radical ones compared to the general public:

    http://www.rp.pl/Polityka/180419488-Sondaz-W-grupie-18-29-lat-Kaczynski-Korwin-i-Kukiz-maja-70-procent-poparcia.html

    For anyone wanting to read the story in more detail, Deepl.com has decent translation of Polish to English, I find it better than Google Translate. German engineering is impressive, indeed.

    This gels with my general observation that Poles are more left-leaning the higher up you go in the age brackets. The exception would only be those at 65 or older. But certainly the most liberal generation tend to be those in the 40-65 range and those are the people essentially in power. It's quite telling that Kaczynski is over 65 and most of his deputies are either technocrats who were lured from the liberals (Morawiecki) or people long lost in the political wilderness.

    What surprised me was how well Wolność("freedom") fared, which is a libertarian party though one with a hard-right leader. Even among the general population, they get 4%(!). This is higher than even a supposedly libertarian society like the US ever managed to do. On feminism he goes much further than PiS ever dares to. On immigration he's surprisingly non-crap for a libertarian. Wolność is good, because they disproportionate support from educated young men. Better have the smart young men be right-wing libertarians than bugmen. Also easier to convert at a later date.

    Korwin, the leader of Wolność, is also the most pro-Russian one, to the point of being accused of being a 'Russian agent'. This also gels with my observation that pro-Russian sentiments rise substantially among the youth. According to the latest eurobarometer poll, while around 25-27% of Poles had favourable views of Russia, this rises to over 50% for those under 29.

    We basically have to hold out for maybe 15 years or so before we can have a real right-wing consolidation in Poland and not the bland nonsense PiS is offering at the moment.

    It is sad to hear that libertarians are succeeding in Poland in turning brains of young males (girls usually have more common sense) into the scrambled eggs w/o ability to think straight. The “Libertarian Project” was quite successful in America in giving virtually all power to oligarchy making any grass root communitarian movements impossible. Though in the US this operation was much simpler because of the presence of Blacks. Any social program can be compromised and ridiculed as serving lazy Black only. The slavery is the gift that keeps on giving (to the slave owners). I am surprised that in the monoethnic and monocultural society of Poland people can fall for this blatant psyop that is against their own interest. Probably the Polish libertarians (young males who think they will be young and healthy forever and probably rich) are also against retirement pensions and universal medical care. They will get what they wish because that is what TPTB want just with a little help of useful idiots.

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  116. Talha says:
    @Thorfinnsson


    I’ve come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.
     
    It's not just leftists in academia. It's also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    Liberal capitalism can't be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption. Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn't specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).

    And then there's the "liberal" part. E.g. the antebellum South had a free market, capitalist economy. It also had racially based slavery and "guardianship" laws for women.


    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There’s also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn’t for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there’s the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let’s hope it stays that way.
     
    India is proceeding down a negative path despite the current political success of the Hindu Nationalists.

    India is chock full of the sort of subversive Western liberast NGOs which China banned and Russia severely restricted (and now Hungary is as well). It's quite telling that normal Indians often refer to pozzed progressives as "NGO-types".

    The sexual revolution is still in a fairly embryonic stage in India, but cohabitation is now common enough that everyone is aware of it. Newspapers denounce cohabitation and "inter-community" romances still, but we'll see how long that last. More advanced is the mobilization of women into education and the workforce. You see very few Indian women in business so far, but half of new medical school graduates are women. Divorce is legal and ticking up, and I've even seen women who get married but do not take the name of their husbands.

    The real problem is the that the Indian elite is largely fluent in English and comfortable interacting with America and Great Britain. They therefore maintain closer links with the large Indian diaspora abroad than is the case with the Chinese, and this allows the continuous transmission of degenerate Western values into India.

    The Hindu Nationalists aren't addressing the problem. They're not even willing to repeal discriminatory laws against Hindu schools, let alone expel foreign NGOs.

    And if the growing influence of Western progressivism weren't bad enough, India suffers from an ever-increasing Mohammedan population. Mohammedans were 7% of the population in 1947, but today they are 17%. Indian law also permits polygamy for Mohammedans but not other religions.

    That said India is inherently the world's most reactionary civilization, and while most Brahmins are Congress supporters a fraction of them consider themselves the bearers of Indian culture and thus support Hindutva.

    Indian television and cinema mostly promote pride in Indian civilization as well, though there have been some pieces which mock religion. Indians tend to riot whenever this occurs.

    The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    This is what Eric Voegelin thought. That liberalism isn’t really something completely alien, but that it is an older heresy within the Christian tradition – a Gnostic heresy:
    “Democracy as Gnosticism?

    Voegelin saw gnosticism all over the modern age. He even considered liberalism, constitutionalism, and “democratism” to be gnostic ideologies, and some of his students were extremely hard on John Locke, who had a sizeable influence on the American Founding….Voegelin never provided a complete catalogue, but one may say that among the gnostic ideologies with which we are faced every day are: progressivism, positivism, egalitarianism, Freudianism, Marxist and non-Marxist socialism, scientism, that civil libertarianism which follows in the footsteps of John Stuart Mill’s progressivism, that conservatism which seeks to “freeze” history at a particular point in time, feminism, pacifism, and idealism (as opposed to realism) in international politics. Some of these ideologies emphasize movement toward a goal rather than the nature of the goal pursued, progressivism being the best example, but they are still gnostic.

    There has, moreover, been a development in the last 25 years about which Voegelin remained silent even though it began already during his lifetime, namely, the emergence of gnosticism on a grand scale in the Christian Churches in the form of liberation theology and much of the peace-and-justice and liturgical-reform movements. ”

    https://www.crisismagazine.com/1990/the-new-gnosticism-the-philosopher-eric-voegelin-finds-an-old-christian-heresy-to-be-very-much-alive

    Peace.

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  117. @22pp22
    I am glad NZ bucks the trend of high IQ people being concentrated in urban areas. Marlborough is the sticks. There is no town there of any size.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/better-business/89570838/Chart-of-the-day-Which-region-has-the-most-students-leaving-school-with-NCEA-2-or-above

    Northland and Gisborne are mainly Maori. Nelson is a town of about 50,000. Otago (population 224,000) is a huge and very rural province with one city of any size, Dunedin (population 120,000).

    If the rest of the world decides to destroy itself, hopefully they'll forget we even exist and New Zealand will emerge as the world's dominant power.

    Which is as it should be.

    Nah, dude, NZ’ers will be speaking Mandarin like most of the rest of Asia.

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  118. Western stooge Yeltsin appointed Putin

    That “Western stooge” single handedly turned Russia from a smoldering wreck into one of the most powerful countries in the world and set the stage for the highest living standards that the Russian people have ever experienced.

    Show some respect.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Being ruled by Yeltsin is what I would wish on my enemies.
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  119. LondonBob says:
    @songbird
    According to stereotype, there is a stark clinal change somewhere along the line of the old Orient - I'm talking about the Middle East and possibly Greece. Maybe, it is more early farmer than hunter gather. Not just pederasty but animal abuse.

    When the US got involved in Afghanistan in the '80s, they found that the mules they supplied were being abused at a high rate. A Greek CIA guy (prob the only one at the time) said, being Greek, he understood the culture. As long as you are the doer - it is considered normal, or not very abhorrent. Of course, US allies abused many boys there.

    I don't know whether to trust him as a source, but Lawrence of Arabia wrote a lot about that sort of thing, not just among Arabs but also Turks. Jews are also stereotyped as having a high predilection elsewhere. See Berlin, before the Nazis came to power.

    Jewish men are twice as likely to be homosexual.

    http://lukeford.net/blog/?p=88701

    Read More
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  120. Mitleser says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    That said, the Chinese government really dislikes gay content so its not a jump to think that its coming from somewhere high.

    http://www.newsweek.com/revealed-worlds-most-unwelcoming-city-gay-people-probably-not-where-you-629597

    http://www.ibtimes.com/chinese-media-says-supreme-court-gay-marriage-ruling-hype-will-induce-potential-1988087

    https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/14/world/asia/china-same-sex-marriage-ruling.html

    Its fairly evident that there's Party policy that considers the expansion of gays to be social damage, and damage must be mitigated however it is possible, within reason. From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.

    From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.

    Just invest in artificial womb.
    With enough advanced tech, even gays should be able to have biological children.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates. Consider the difficulties of this baby:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/12/world/asia/china-baby-dead-parents.html

    It'll never be an inexpensive proposition, not to mention, it'll wreck havoc with Confucianism being promoted by the Party atm.

    , @Talha

    Just invest in artificial womb.
     
    I guess the complete gutting of the word "mother" is a small price to pay for churning out more and more descendants of homosexuals:
    "We have enjoined upon man kindness to his parents: In pain did his mother bear him, and in pain did she give him birth..." (46:15)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjrRVDO6MMQ&t=9s

    LOL - maybe this new society will call us Muslims even more backwards for still having mothers...

    "To say one was a mother - that was a past joke: it was an obscenity" - Brave New World

    Peace.
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  121. @Mitleser

    From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.
     
    Just invest in artificial womb.
    With enough advanced tech, even gays should be able to have biological children.

    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates. Consider the difficulties of this baby:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/12/world/asia/china-baby-dead-parents.html

    It’ll never be an inexpensive proposition, not to mention, it’ll wreck havoc with Confucianism being promoted by the Party atm.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser

    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates.
     
    Very backward.

    If the party does not manage to increase the Chinese birth rate to an acceptable level, they have to become more flexible.
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  122. Mitleser says:
    @Greasy William

    Western stooge Yeltsin appointed Putin
     
    That "Western stooge" single handedly turned Russia from a smoldering wreck into one of the most powerful countries in the world and set the stage for the highest living standards that the Russian people have ever experienced.

    Show some respect.

    Being ruled by Yeltsin is what I would wish on my enemies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    It is not fair that only Russia gets to be ruled by him, Israel must also have a chance to share in his greatness.

    Greasy: Campaign for Yelsin for next Israeli President now! Sobriety in office is overrated!
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  123. @Greasy William
    Dem lead on the Generic ballot down to 6: https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/congress-generic-ballot-polls/

    There do not exist instruments which can measure how little the American electorate cares about Syria.

    Another ray of light:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thorfinnsson
    Greasy William is basically correct--voters don't care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.

    This is a classic special interest problem. The benefits of peace and good relations are diffuse and not obvious, so no one is highly motivated to pursue them. Meanwhile there are several highly motivated special interests who benefit from the war machine.

    Not sure at this point in time whether or not I favor a GOP wipeout in the mid-terms. They absolutely deserve it, but it could simply make things worse.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-a-reluctant-hawk-has-battled-his-top-aides-on-russia-and-lost/2018/04/15/a91e850a-3f1b-11e8-974f-aacd97698cef_story.html?noredirect=on

    This article, if true, is quite damning. It shows that Trump is unable to control the government--thanks of course to his own appalling selection of personnel. This problem could get worse now that the Dweeb State has managed to find war ghouls with personalities amenable to Trump.

    , @Randal
    Difficult to be unstintingly happy about the prospect of a second Trump term now, though.

    The disaster of a Democrat President averted, sure, and another brutal slap in the face for at least one of the two groups who most require such treatment (how will they top the present hysterical nonsense?)

    On the other hand, the reelection of a warmongering pro-Israeli tool of the second group of people who most need a good slap in the face - the neocon warmongering Israeli firsters.

    And of course another confirmation of the disastrous irrelevance of anti-interventionist sentiment in US politics.
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  124. @Mitleser
    Being ruled by Yeltsin is what I would wish on my enemies.

    It is not fair that only Russia gets to be ruled by him, Israel must also have a chance to share in his greatness.

    Greasy: Campaign for Yelsin for next Israeli President now! Sobriety in office is overrated!

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    Sobriety in office is overrated!

     

    Reminds me of this (when the last Russian troops left Germany in 1994):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7BJUsxNtlI
    Was really embarrassing since he was so obviously drunk.
    , @Greasy William
    I wish the Jewish people had a leader as great as Yeltsin.

    If Yeltsin resurrected and wanted to convert, I would definitely support him being Israel's PM.

    ...

    If it wasn't for Yeltsin this blog wouldn't even exist because Russia would be a backward shithole with a 5k per capita GDP and nobody would care about it.
    , @Talha

    Sobriety in office is overrated!
     
    What the hell???!!! You mean these guys are NOT drunk - are you kidding me??!!

    Peace.
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  125. @Anatoly Karlin
    Another ray of light:

    https://twitter.com/BrittonTallar42/status/985886257887809536

    Greasy William is basically correct–voters don’t care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.

    This is a classic special interest problem. The benefits of peace and good relations are diffuse and not obvious, so no one is highly motivated to pursue them. Meanwhile there are several highly motivated special interests who benefit from the war machine.

    Not sure at this point in time whether or not I favor a GOP wipeout in the mid-terms. They absolutely deserve it, but it could simply make things worse.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-a-reluctant-hawk-has-battled-his-top-aides-on-russia-and-lost/2018/04/15/a91e850a-3f1b-11e8-974f-aacd97698cef_story.html?noredirect=on

    This article, if true, is quite damning. It shows that Trump is unable to control the government–thanks of course to his own appalling selection of personnel. This problem could get worse now that the Dweeb State has managed to find war ghouls with personalities amenable to Trump.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal

    Greasy William is basically correct–voters don’t care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.
     
    I would suggest it's more about the perception of winning than the body bags per se. Admittedly, you tend to get more body bags when you aren't winning.

    And there is clearly some constituency for non-intervention that could have an impact at the margins. Some people who supported Trump first time around likely won't do so this time. The problem is that they have nowhere else to go, and they might be outnumbered by those coming to support him for other reasons. Mostly, though, Americans are just suckers for jingoist militarist aggression because it fits so well with the exceptionalist, messianic core of American culture. Not sure what my own country's excuse is, mind you.
    , @John Gruskos
    The real divide in American politics isn't between the Republicans on the one hand and the Democrats on the other.

    The real divide is between the conservative Republicans (Freedom Caucus and their fellow travelers) on the one hand, and the Democrats and neocons on the other.

    It doesn't matter one way or the other if establishment figures with a "D" next to their name replace establishment figures with an "R" next to their name.

    The important thing is to increase the clout of the conservative Republicans, which I define as people who have an "A" rating from immigration restriction group NumbersUSA and who also voted against arming the "moderate rebels" in Syria in 2014 (or would have if they'd been in congress).
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  126. @Daniel Chieh
    It is not fair that only Russia gets to be ruled by him, Israel must also have a chance to share in his greatness.

    Greasy: Campaign for Yelsin for next Israeli President now! Sobriety in office is overrated!

    Sobriety in office is overrated!

    Reminds me of this (when the last Russian troops left Germany in 1994):

    Was really embarrassing since he was so obviously drunk.

    Read More
    • LOL: Daniel Chieh
    • Replies: @songbird
    There was some small band (not a good one) called Yeltsin's Liver. There was also a guy close to him for a while. Instead of Yeltsin's right-hand man, Russians called him Yeltsin's right-hand glass.

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.
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  127. Mitleser says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates. Consider the difficulties of this baby:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/12/world/asia/china-baby-dead-parents.html

    It'll never be an inexpensive proposition, not to mention, it'll wreck havoc with Confucianism being promoted by the Party atm.

    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates.

    Very backward.

    If the party does not manage to increase the Chinese birth rate to an acceptable level, they have to become more flexible.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Let's first see what they can do with current incentives and social credit, yes?
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  128. @Daniel Chieh
    It is not fair that only Russia gets to be ruled by him, Israel must also have a chance to share in his greatness.

    Greasy: Campaign for Yelsin for next Israeli President now! Sobriety in office is overrated!

    I wish the Jewish people had a leader as great as Yeltsin.

    If Yeltsin resurrected and wanted to convert, I would definitely support him being Israel’s PM.

    If it wasn’t for Yeltsin this blog wouldn’t even exist because Russia would be a backward shithole with a 5k per capita GDP and nobody would care about it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry

    I wish the Jewish people had a leader as great as Yeltsin.

    If Yeltsin resurrected and wanted to convert, I would definitely support him being Israel’s PM.
     

    Well Americans cannot vote in Israel elections (and only few vote in Russian elections). Which is probably good news for both countries in this case :)

    Yeltsin was just a vegetable by the end.


    If it wasn’t for Yeltsin this blog wouldn’t even exist because Russia would be a backward shithole with a 5k per capita GDP and nobody would care about it.

     

    Not really possible - the economy mainly grew in a turbo-charged way simply because of the commodity super-cycle - above all around ten times increase in the price of oil from 1998-2007.

    There are few scenarios in which the country could not get rich under such circumstances, although to the positive credit of Putin's first two terms, he has managed government budget with austerity despite this.

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  129. @Polish Perspective

    Sina Weibo has removed the word "gay" from a censorship notice after mass outcry over the way the directive cast gay content as being similarly vulgar to porn and violent content https://t.co/SsKln5mxzR— Christian 马思潭 (@cdcshepherd) 16 april 2018
     
    Seems like 'based Xi' backtracked. Not surprising, if you're aware of the underlying trends in China:

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/02/27/chinas-new-multibillion-dollar-target-market-lgbt-youth/

    Social conservatism may be common among Xi's generation, but not really for those under the age of 40, especially in cities. In this sense, China is not an exception.

    Poland much gayer than the rest of the V4
     
    As it happens, I personally don't care about gay marriage as an issue. Nevertheless, blatant falsehoods deserve to be answered.


    https://i.imgur.com/MHpZfJh.png

    Unless my eyes deceive me, gay marriage support is far greater in Czechia than in Poland.

    I'm fairly sure you're aware of this AK, which makes your comment all the more curious. So why would you spread obvious lies?

    It’s a joke, calm down.

    Also I don’t care overly much about it either. But the big gap between Poland or Hungary is strange, no?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polish Perspective

    Also I don’t care overly much about it either
     
    You seem to take it as an important indicator of general poz, though. One of my arguments on homosexuality is that I don't see much of a correlation between it and attitudes on diversity and immigration. Russia itself is a great example of that. Czech Republic is the polar opposite. By far the most-pro gay country in EE, yet also one of the best on immigration.

    The same argument extends to religiosity. One could take the US, which certainly in the 60s and 70s was arguably the most religious Western country, aside from perhaps Italy, by far. Yet all that religion didn't help them in resisting and/or overturning the 1965 immigration act.

    One could look at Turkey vs China for another comparison. Erdogan is pushing Islamism in an already very religious(by Western standards) country but has relatively open borders policies. China is an atheist country*, but its immigration policies make the Japanese look meek. When it comes to religion and homosexuality, both bête noires for many on the dissident right, I find both to have weak to nonexistent predictive value.

    *ancestry worship is quite popular in China and certainly constitutes a form of religion, but the question remains exactly how one should draw the threshold of when it becomes an organised religion, if ever.

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  130. Talha says:
    @Mitleser

    From a completely practical perspective, they want to increase the population and this is not going to happen with same-sex couples.
     
    Just invest in artificial womb.
    With enough advanced tech, even gays should be able to have biological children.

    Just invest in artificial womb.

    I guess the complete gutting of the word “mother” is a small price to pay for churning out more and more descendants of homosexuals:
    “We have enjoined upon man kindness to his parents: In pain did his mother bear him, and in pain did she give him birth…” (46:15)

    LOL – maybe this new society will call us Muslims even more backwards for still having mothers…

    “To say one was a mother – that was a past joke: it was an obscenity” – Brave New World

    Peace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser

    “To say one was a mother – that was a past joke: it was an obscenity” – Brave New World
     
    Just the logical outcome of historical developments.

    The government is the mother, the technology is the father.
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  131. Talha says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    It is not fair that only Russia gets to be ruled by him, Israel must also have a chance to share in his greatness.

    Greasy: Campaign for Yelsin for next Israeli President now! Sobriety in office is overrated!

    Sobriety in office is overrated!

    What the hell???!!! You mean these guys are NOT drunk – are you kidding me??!!

    Peace.

    Read More
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  132. @Talha
    Hell no man - open thread...meaning...

    You get to talk about who you would or would not bang.

    We get to talk about "da poo poo" as needs be.

    Mr. Karlin can intervene as he wishes.

    Peace.

    Agreed with Greasy, nobody wants these mental images, let’s move on.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    Will do - it's your sandbox.

    Peace.
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  133. @Mitleser

    Its not even legal in China to have surrogates.
     
    Very backward.

    If the party does not manage to increase the Chinese birth rate to an acceptable level, they have to become more flexible.

    Let’s first see what they can do with current incentives and social credit, yes?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Re: incentives and social credit

    Three dozen pilot systems have been rolled out in cities across the country, and Rongcheng is one of them. According to Chinese officials and researchers, it’s the best example of the system working as intended.
     

    The reason why Rongcheng has the most successful social credit system so far is that the community has embraced it, Zhang says. And that has happened because the scheme basically only deducts points for breaking the law. It is precise in its punishment and generous in its rewards.

    As a result, schools, hospitals, and neighborhoods are independently running versions of it. “It’s not because the government has asked them to do it,” Zhang says. “It’s because they feel it’s better for their own administration.”
     
    http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/04/03/life-inside-chinas-social-credit-laboratory/

    If not enough Chinese won't want (more) children, they won't have (more) them.
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  134. Talha says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Agreed with Greasy, nobody wants these mental images, let's move on.

    Will do – it’s your sandbox.

    Peace.

    Read More
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  135. Robots Ride to the Rescue Where Workers Can’t Be Found
    Fast-growing economies in Eastern Europe have led to severe labor shortages, so companies are calling in the machines.

    Interesting overview of broader macro trends. Though the excessive focus on machines, while understandably given the preponderance of manufacturing in CEE, is somewhat misleading in the medium to long run. A great deal of clerical, semi-skilled service jobs will be wiped out through smarter algorithms. When people think automation, they still too often trap themselves in thinking about only physical robots.

    P.S. Today ZTE was banned by the USG to dealing with any US company. This means ZTE phones can now no longer use Snapdragon processors, for instance. Huawei has been in the crosshairs for a long time, but are they now too big to ban?

    Either way, Trump really has ratcheted up the economic warfare vs China and Russia. The end of the petrodollar can’t come soon enough.

    Read More
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  136. @Greasy William
    Dem lead on the Generic ballot down to 6: https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/congress-generic-ballot-polls/

    There do not exist instruments which can measure how little the American electorate cares about Syria.

    If Americans don’t care about Syria, then it doesn’t make any sense for Americans to risk WW3 (and the demographic swamping of Europe, and the extermination of Middle Eastern Christians, and the revival of Al-Qaeda/ISIS) to ensure Israel’s preferred outcome in Syria.

    Read More
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  137. Randal says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Another ray of light:

    https://twitter.com/BrittonTallar42/status/985886257887809536

    Difficult to be unstintingly happy about the prospect of a second Trump term now, though.

    The disaster of a Democrat President averted, sure, and another brutal slap in the face for at least one of the two groups who most require such treatment (how will they top the present hysterical nonsense?)

    On the other hand, the reelection of a warmongering pro-Israeli tool of the second group of people who most need a good slap in the face – the neocon warmongering Israeli firsters.

    And of course another confirmation of the disastrous irrelevance of anti-interventionist sentiment in US politics.

    Read More
    • Agree: German_reader
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  138. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    Sobriety in office is overrated!

     

    Reminds me of this (when the last Russian troops left Germany in 1994):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7BJUsxNtlI
    Was really embarrassing since he was so obviously drunk.

    There was some small band (not a good one) called Yeltsin’s Liver. There was also a guy close to him for a while. Instead of Yeltsin’s right-hand man, Russians called him Yeltsin’s right-hand glass.

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.
     
    But by whom? Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.
    Certainly an appalling person though.
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  139. Mitleser says:
    @Talha

    Just invest in artificial womb.
     
    I guess the complete gutting of the word "mother" is a small price to pay for churning out more and more descendants of homosexuals:
    "We have enjoined upon man kindness to his parents: In pain did his mother bear him, and in pain did she give him birth..." (46:15)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GjrRVDO6MMQ&t=9s

    LOL - maybe this new society will call us Muslims even more backwards for still having mothers...

    "To say one was a mother - that was a past joke: it was an obscenity" - Brave New World

    Peace.

    “To say one was a mother – that was a past joke: it was an obscenity” – Brave New World

    Just the logical outcome of historical developments.

    The government is the mother, the technology is the father.

    Read More
    • Agree: Talha
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I'm dubious, we would see a lot more IVF fertilization but its still pretty minimal. Technology's great but its usually pretty expensive.

    Maybe it'll be an elite thing, at most. And yes, for same sex couples. But you'll be working with an extremely minimal set of people(same sex people who also want children, who also have the money for this).
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  140. @songbird
    There was some small band (not a good one) called Yeltsin's Liver. There was also a guy close to him for a while. Instead of Yeltsin's right-hand man, Russians called him Yeltsin's right-hand glass.

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.

    But by whom? Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.
    Certainly an appalling person though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    how was he appalling?

    Russian's have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin's reforms, yes or no?
    , @songbird
    Internal power-brokers. Bankers and early oligarchs. People who saw him as easy to control and profit from.

    He doesn't seem like a charismatic figure that people just naturally get behind. I mean, he tried to commit suicide, and when he was younger lost a few of his fingers from playing with a grenade. Definitely, not a guy that inspires confidence in his ability to lead.
    , @ussr andy
    >Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.

    the USSR did suffer total ideological subversion of its elites, CIA or not.

    I blame cargo cultism.
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  141. Missiles fired in Syria!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Anti-missile technology companies now having surging shares.
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  142. Randal says:
    @Thorfinnsson
    Greasy William is basically correct--voters don't care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.

    This is a classic special interest problem. The benefits of peace and good relations are diffuse and not obvious, so no one is highly motivated to pursue them. Meanwhile there are several highly motivated special interests who benefit from the war machine.

    Not sure at this point in time whether or not I favor a GOP wipeout in the mid-terms. They absolutely deserve it, but it could simply make things worse.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-a-reluctant-hawk-has-battled-his-top-aides-on-russia-and-lost/2018/04/15/a91e850a-3f1b-11e8-974f-aacd97698cef_story.html?noredirect=on

    This article, if true, is quite damning. It shows that Trump is unable to control the government--thanks of course to his own appalling selection of personnel. This problem could get worse now that the Dweeb State has managed to find war ghouls with personalities amenable to Trump.

    Greasy William is basically correct–voters don’t care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.

    I would suggest it’s more about the perception of winning than the body bags per se. Admittedly, you tend to get more body bags when you aren’t winning.

    And there is clearly some constituency for non-intervention that could have an impact at the margins. Some people who supported Trump first time around likely won’t do so this time. The problem is that they have nowhere else to go, and they might be outnumbered by those coming to support him for other reasons. Mostly, though, Americans are just suckers for jingoist militarist aggression because it fits so well with the exceptionalist, messianic core of American culture. Not sure what my own country’s excuse is, mind you.

    Read More
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  143. @German_reader

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.
     
    But by whom? Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.
    Certainly an appalling person though.

    how was he appalling?

    Russian’s have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin’s reforms, yes or no?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Homocides recorded in Russia in 1994:

    47,870

    Homocides recorded in Russia in 2017:

    8,844
    , @German_reader

    Russian’s have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin’s reforms
     
    I recall how in the 1990s there were newsstories about elderly pensioners in Russia being forced out of their apartments by criminal gangs...or just murdered (can Russian readers confirm such things happened?)...sounded like a nightmare for normal people. And of course living standards declined for millions of Russians during the 1990s, which you know as well when you're not in trolling mode.
    Besides, just think how humiliating something like Yeltsin's performance in Berlin in 1994 must have been...in the city where the Red Army won its final victory in the greatest war ever, and when Russian troops leave their "leader" is this pathetic drunkard...
    So I don't think you have any reasons for envy, even allowing for Israeli politicians' predilection for corruption and sex crimes.
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  144. @Anatoly Karlin
    It's a joke, calm down.

    Also I don't care overly much about it either. But the big gap between Poland or Hungary is strange, no?

    Also I don’t care overly much about it either

    You seem to take it as an important indicator of general poz, though. One of my arguments on homosexuality is that I don’t see much of a correlation between it and attitudes on diversity and immigration. Russia itself is a great example of that. Czech Republic is the polar opposite. By far the most-pro gay country in EE, yet also one of the best on immigration.

    The same argument extends to religiosity. One could take the US, which certainly in the 60s and 70s was arguably the most religious Western country, aside from perhaps Italy, by far. Yet all that religion didn’t help them in resisting and/or overturning the 1965 immigration act.

    One could look at Turkey vs China for another comparison. Erdogan is pushing Islamism in an already very religious(by Western standards) country but has relatively open borders policies. China is an atheist country*, but its immigration policies make the Japanese look meek. When it comes to religion and homosexuality, both bête noires for many on the dissident right, I find both to have weak to nonexistent predictive value.

    *ancestry worship is quite popular in China and certainly constitutes a form of religion, but the question remains exactly how one should draw the threshold of when it becomes an organised religion, if ever.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous

    China is an atheist country
     
    I wouldn't call China an atheist country. 31% of the population has some kind of religious belief, with 21 million Muslims, 61 million Christians, 245 million Buddhists, and millions of others. Go to any Taoist temple in China and you would see hordes of people burn incense and pray sincerely.



    Muslim in Shanghai, China. Took over the streets to pray.

    https://youtu.be/JBe7x66WhG8?t=75
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  145. @Mitleser

    “To say one was a mother – that was a past joke: it was an obscenity” – Brave New World
     
    Just the logical outcome of historical developments.

    The government is the mother, the technology is the father.

    I’m dubious, we would see a lot more IVF fertilization but its still pretty minimal. Technology’s great but its usually pretty expensive.

    Maybe it’ll be an elite thing, at most. And yes, for same sex couples. But you’ll be working with an extremely minimal set of people(same sex people who also want children, who also have the money for this).

    Read More
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  146. @Thorfinnsson
    Greasy William is basically correct--voters don't care much about foreign policy until the body bags pile up.

    This is a classic special interest problem. The benefits of peace and good relations are diffuse and not obvious, so no one is highly motivated to pursue them. Meanwhile there are several highly motivated special interests who benefit from the war machine.

    Not sure at this point in time whether or not I favor a GOP wipeout in the mid-terms. They absolutely deserve it, but it could simply make things worse.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-a-reluctant-hawk-has-battled-his-top-aides-on-russia-and-lost/2018/04/15/a91e850a-3f1b-11e8-974f-aacd97698cef_story.html?noredirect=on

    This article, if true, is quite damning. It shows that Trump is unable to control the government--thanks of course to his own appalling selection of personnel. This problem could get worse now that the Dweeb State has managed to find war ghouls with personalities amenable to Trump.

    The real divide in American politics isn’t between the Republicans on the one hand and the Democrats on the other.

    The real divide is between the conservative Republicans (Freedom Caucus and their fellow travelers) on the one hand, and the Democrats and neocons on the other.

    It doesn’t matter one way or the other if establishment figures with a “D” next to their name replace establishment figures with an “R” next to their name.

    The important thing is to increase the clout of the conservative Republicans, which I define as people who have an “A” rating from immigration restriction group NumbersUSA and who also voted against arming the “moderate rebels” in Syria in 2014 (or would have if they’d been in congress).

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  147. Anon 2 says:
    @songbird
    Europe and Britain in particular had some really amazing engineering, but I'm talking about something different - the scale and treatment. Chlorine and fluoridation. Sewage treatment. Water traveling a hundred miles in underground pipes by gravity. Something that happens in many locations across massive distances, not just in one or two cities.

    Something on the individual level like Boston. The Quabbin Reservoir is like a 100 miles from Boston. That was built starting in the 1930s. Not with channels or streams but underground pipes. The Deer Island treatment plant - treats sewage, then sends it 10 miles out to sea in a pipe under the ocean. of course, that was built much later. There were certainly may earlier systems with long distances like NYC, and I'm sure you could drink the water in Boston and other locations (lead pipes, of course) along time before the Quabbin was built.

    I don't how comparable any of that is - I'd guess you can certainly drink the water in Western Europe, and I'd definitely consider it first world now and decades in the past. In some cases, I think they have superior technology - ozone instead of chlorine. Maybe, the evolution of it was concurrent in some places, but the precedent isn't really that important to my argument. I'm talking about what makes the first world different, not necessarily the US, though obviously the US is a better comparison point for China because of scale.

    In Poland tap water was perfectly drinkable, generally starting in the late
    1950s, once the country largely rebuilt itself after the war

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    Interesting. Under the old terminology that would place Communist Poland in the Second World. Basically, a place with societal order, but not the same standard of living. Perhaps, it is not as good a metric as I supposed.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    England I've heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.
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  148. @Greasy William
    how was he appalling?

    Russian's have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin's reforms, yes or no?

    Homocides recorded in Russia in 1994:

    47,870

    Homocides recorded in Russia in 2017:

    8,844

    Read More
    • Replies: @iffen
    Homocides recorded in Russia in 1994: 47,870

    Well, that's one way to deal with the homo problem.

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  149. @Greasy William
    how was he appalling?

    Russian's have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin's reforms, yes or no?

    Russian’s have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin’s reforms

    I recall how in the 1990s there were newsstories about elderly pensioners in Russia being forced out of their apartments by criminal gangs…or just murdered (can Russian readers confirm such things happened?)…sounded like a nightmare for normal people. And of course living standards declined for millions of Russians during the 1990s, which you know as well when you’re not in trolling mode.
    Besides, just think how humiliating something like Yeltsin’s performance in Berlin in 1994 must have been…in the city where the Red Army won its final victory in the greatest war ever, and when Russian troops leave their “leader” is this pathetic drunkard…
    So I don’t think you have any reasons for envy, even allowing for Israeli politicians’ predilection for corruption and sex crimes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    So the chaos that happened in the aftermath of the collapse of the Communist system was Yeltsin's fault?

    What about all the work Yeltsin did to rebuild state institutions? What about his economic reforms?


    Basically Yeltsin did all the work and Putin got all the credit.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Correct. They were called "black realtors."

    Yeltsin was a complete scumbag at a personal level. Boorish, vain, not very bright, and increasingly, an alcoholic.

    Very much unlike Gorbachev - very intelligent, conscientious, treated his underlings well (everybody seems to agree on the latter). Tragically naive, though.

    PS. Funny video from the 1990s. Chad Chechen Warlord forces the Virgin Yeltsin to give up his seat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX3-vIFw81k

    (Putin had him assassinated in 2004).
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  150. I have a growing folder of “powerful takes” from /r/politics. This recent one is one of the more powerful ones.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    Just so you know, this is not how most American's think.

    I know you've been gone for a while so I'm giving you a reminder. Actually the Russia stuff has really died down here, the media barely talks about it now.
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  151. @German_reader

    Russian’s have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin’s reforms
     
    I recall how in the 1990s there were newsstories about elderly pensioners in Russia being forced out of their apartments by criminal gangs...or just murdered (can Russian readers confirm such things happened?)...sounded like a nightmare for normal people. And of course living standards declined for millions of Russians during the 1990s, which you know as well when you're not in trolling mode.
    Besides, just think how humiliating something like Yeltsin's performance in Berlin in 1994 must have been...in the city where the Red Army won its final victory in the greatest war ever, and when Russian troops leave their "leader" is this pathetic drunkard...
    So I don't think you have any reasons for envy, even allowing for Israeli politicians' predilection for corruption and sex crimes.

    So the chaos that happened in the aftermath of the collapse of the Communist system was Yeltsin’s fault?

    What about all the work Yeltsin did to rebuild state institutions? What about his economic reforms?

    Basically Yeltsin did all the work and Putin got all the credit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    That seems like a highly dubious interpretation to me, given that the privatization process under Yeltsin was a massive looting of state assets by organized criminals.
    Maybe AK or some of the Russian commenters can answer in more detail.
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  152. @Greasy William
    Missiles fired in Syria!

    Anti-missile technology companies now having surging shares.

    Read More
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  153. @Anatoly Karlin
    I have a growing folder of "powerful takes" from /r/politics. This recent one is one of the more powerful ones.

    https://twitter.com/akarlin88/status/985963137781268480

    Just so you know, this is not how most American’s think.

    I know you’ve been gone for a while so I’m giving you a reminder. Actually the Russia stuff has really died down here, the media barely talks about it now.

    Read More
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  154. @Greasy William
    So the chaos that happened in the aftermath of the collapse of the Communist system was Yeltsin's fault?

    What about all the work Yeltsin did to rebuild state institutions? What about his economic reforms?


    Basically Yeltsin did all the work and Putin got all the credit.

    That seems like a highly dubious interpretation to me, given that the privatization process under Yeltsin was a massive looting of state assets by organized criminals.
    Maybe AK or some of the Russian commenters can answer in more detail.

    Read More
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  155. @German_reader

    Russian’s have the highest living standards that they ever have in history thanks to Yeltsin’s reforms
     
    I recall how in the 1990s there were newsstories about elderly pensioners in Russia being forced out of their apartments by criminal gangs...or just murdered (can Russian readers confirm such things happened?)...sounded like a nightmare for normal people. And of course living standards declined for millions of Russians during the 1990s, which you know as well when you're not in trolling mode.
    Besides, just think how humiliating something like Yeltsin's performance in Berlin in 1994 must have been...in the city where the Red Army won its final victory in the greatest war ever, and when Russian troops leave their "leader" is this pathetic drunkard...
    So I don't think you have any reasons for envy, even allowing for Israeli politicians' predilection for corruption and sex crimes.

    Correct. They were called “black realtors.”

    Yeltsin was a complete scumbag at a personal level. Boorish, vain, not very bright, and increasingly, an alcoholic.

    Very much unlike Gorbachev – very intelligent, conscientious, treated his underlings well (everybody seems to agree on the latter). Tragically naive, though.

    PS. Funny video from the 1990s. Chad Chechen Warlord forces the Virgin Yeltsin to give up his seat.

    (Putin had him assassinated in 2004).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William
    so you oppose Yeltsin's economic reforms?
    , @Dmitry
    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.

    The Americans have some funny stories about this, from when he first visited America, and was asking the American politicians famously stupid questions about how they could co-ordinate so many different kinds of restaurants in the same country, and things like that.

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  156. @Anatoly Karlin
    Correct. They were called "black realtors."

    Yeltsin was a complete scumbag at a personal level. Boorish, vain, not very bright, and increasingly, an alcoholic.

    Very much unlike Gorbachev - very intelligent, conscientious, treated his underlings well (everybody seems to agree on the latter). Tragically naive, though.

    PS. Funny video from the 1990s. Chad Chechen Warlord forces the Virgin Yeltsin to give up his seat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX3-vIFw81k

    (Putin had him assassinated in 2004).

    so you oppose Yeltsin’s economic reforms?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    I think I have talked at length before, but...

    Many reforms were necessary. Others weren't - most notably, privatization of the large state-owned corporations, which was driven by political factors and should have waited for the establishment of a functioning legal regime.

    It was all handled very, very poorly (even adjusting for the admittedly very tough situation that the reformers found themselves in).

    This is not by any means a radical or even unpopular view even amongst Western transitionologists.
    , @Polish Perspective

    reforms
     
    That's a curious way to spell organised theft and legalised plunder.
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  157. @Thorfinnsson


    I’ve come to the conclusion that leftists in academia are actually overrated as social change agents and that liberal capitalism is a far greater acid on social bonds. China has tried to straddle both those, by on the one hand pragmatically embracing capitalism but at the same time understanding that social liberalism is corrosive.
     
    It's not just leftists in academia. It's also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    Liberal capitalism can't be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption. Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn't specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).

    And then there's the "liberal" part. E.g. the antebellum South had a free market, capitalist economy. It also had racially based slavery and "guardianship" laws for women.


    I used to have high hopes about India, too, but feminism seems even more advanced there among the elite echelons than in China from what I gather reading their elite media. If I would hazard a guess, it could probably be a result of the fact that the elite Indian class is far more likely to be either emigrating to the West or has many close relatives. The wealthy class in India is smaller than in China. There’s also a regional aspect to it. The richest Indian states tend to be Southern, where Hindi fluency is either poor or non-existing and where the de facto lingua franca among the business and media elites is English. Language is central to identity and it also smooths the way for Western cultural norms into India the way it doesn’t for a homogeneous country like China where the main language is not Indo-European.

    Then there’s the fact that Indian elite industries often tend to be based on servicing English-speaking markets (IT, pharma etc) whereas Chinese industries tend to be hardware/manufacturing based where integration into another economy is much more limited and most contact happens only with the senior management, whereas India often likes to export even grunt labour (H1B being a classic example). All this leads to greater cultural integration of India among its elites. The masses are still oblivious to this in India, but elites lead the way. So far it seems China has much more sensible elites. Let’s hope it stays that way.
     
    India is proceeding down a negative path despite the current political success of the Hindu Nationalists.

    India is chock full of the sort of subversive Western liberast NGOs which China banned and Russia severely restricted (and now Hungary is as well). It's quite telling that normal Indians often refer to pozzed progressives as "NGO-types".

    The sexual revolution is still in a fairly embryonic stage in India, but cohabitation is now common enough that everyone is aware of it. Newspapers denounce cohabitation and "inter-community" romances still, but we'll see how long that last. More advanced is the mobilization of women into education and the workforce. You see very few Indian women in business so far, but half of new medical school graduates are women. Divorce is legal and ticking up, and I've even seen women who get married but do not take the name of their husbands.

    The real problem is the that the Indian elite is largely fluent in English and comfortable interacting with America and Great Britain. They therefore maintain closer links with the large Indian diaspora abroad than is the case with the Chinese, and this allows the continuous transmission of degenerate Western values into India.

    The Hindu Nationalists aren't addressing the problem. They're not even willing to repeal discriminatory laws against Hindu schools, let alone expel foreign NGOs.

    And if the growing influence of Western progressivism weren't bad enough, India suffers from an ever-increasing Mohammedan population. Mohammedans were 7% of the population in 1947, but today they are 17%. Indian law also permits polygamy for Mohammedans but not other religions.

    That said India is inherently the world's most reactionary civilization, and while most Brahmins are Congress supporters a fraction of them consider themselves the bearers of Indian culture and thus support Hindutva.

    Indian television and cinema mostly promote pride in Indian civilization as well, though there have been some pieces which mock religion. Indians tend to riot whenever this occurs.

    It’s not just leftists in academia. It’s also leftists in the bureaucracy, primary schools, NGOs, etc. The left is now the priestly class, having displaced Christianity.

    I would be careful with using ‘leftist’ in all those instances since there is now hyperinflation of the term. A lot of ‘leftists’ are really just socially liberal types, even if I agree that genuine leftists are overrepresented in all those places. But in the bureaucracy, in particular, I’d say neoliberals have dominance. But their social values are more or less identical with leftists. This is also why Antifa are protected by the media and the state in a way that right-wing nationalists, especially white nationalists, are not.

    Liberal capitalism can’t be ignored of course in that it is the logic of capitalism to dissolve all social bonds and reduce people solely to their production and consumption.

    Which is why it is a harder foe to fight. Partly because the profit motive is stronger than any ideological conviction. Ideologies change; greed doesn’t. Most people overestimate their own resistance to corruption. A high enough price will buy over the vast majority of people. You see it even on the right. Why do so many not engage in activism? Because they have a lot of material welfare to lose, in other words, it’s a clever way of the system to keep you in check by having you invested in it and to rationalise your passivity by adopting incrementalist positions. In some ways this cowardice is rational. It’s a high-risk with low outcome certainty to be a radical, but in my view, it is also the only way to ensure a change at this point. The system we live in is not negotiating, that should be clear by now. Trump was simply the latest confirmation of that, but this pattern is visible everywhere. FN threw their own founder under the bus, but when Marine wanted to march for Jews, they rejected her. Cucking never helps!

    Certainly on a matter like immigration the impact of capitalism is tremendous, but even here it doesn’t specifically explain the import of unemployable rapefugees. Capitalists would instead prefer to import bonded coolies from India (as they did in the 19th century in British colonies).

    You’re assuming they don’t drink their own poison. What makes you think they unironically don’t believe their own bullshit about Tabula Rasa and the like? Why do you think libertarians in the US have drifted further and further to the left? The latter is a key part of why so many on the Alt-Right are former libertarians.

    Even beyond rapefugees, even if not a single one had come to Europe, it would not change my argument one iota, nor the underlying logic of capitalism of hunting for profit at every cost. This is the true dilemma, because it is a far more efficient system than its competitors, it has proved that over and over again.

    Yet capitalism without restraints – considerations such as keeping a country homogeneous is one – ensures perpetual tension between a genuinely radical right-wing and the economic system. What passes for ‘right wing’ in the West today is mostly just moderate liberals.

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  158. @Greasy William
    so you oppose Yeltsin's economic reforms?

    I think I have talked at length before, but…

    Many reforms were necessary. Others weren’t – most notably, privatization of the large state-owned corporations, which was driven by political factors and should have waited for the establishment of a functioning legal regime.

    It was all handled very, very poorly (even adjusting for the admittedly very tough situation that the reformers found themselves in).

    This is not by any means a radical or even unpopular view even amongst Western transitionologists.

    Read More
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  159. songbird says:
    @Anon 2
    In Poland tap water was perfectly drinkable, generally starting in the late
    1950s, once the country largely rebuilt itself after the war

    Interesting. Under the old terminology that would place Communist Poland in the Second World. Basically, a place with societal order, but not the same standard of living. Perhaps, it is not as good a metric as I supposed.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    England I’ve heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polish Perspective
    Some people still drink bottled water here because our tap water was not very safe at all times, especially in the post-1990 collapse of any and all standards in the name of privatisation and 'innovation'. However, there has been significant strides in the last 10 years alone as the state has re-established itself as a serious force and passed a large number of new laws. But perceptions change slow for some. The EU has been beneficial here, it needs to be said. The neoliberal elite in Poland are very submissive towards the EU, so when regulations are passed by the EU, many of the people who own private media and conglomerates are muted at best with their criticism. The EU itself didn't do much arm-twisting, but it was the imprimatur that helped.

    In general, bottled water is a tremendous waste of resources. Some countries, especially the Nordic ones, have such clean tap water that it is even better than most bottled water. I remember reading a story some years ago about Swedish tap water essentially falling into that category. It is also much cheaper to consume per liter.

    How is it in the states? Do people have tap water? I saw a clip of Louis Black, the clip itself must be 15 years now, where he was lamenting that he had clean tap water as a kid growing up but this was now apparently impossible. He's a guy prone to exaggerations, so I'm not sure how much of it was based in fact. Is it?

    , @Randal

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.
     
    Certainly I grew up in England drinking tap water routinely and with more or less complete faith in it. I still do.

    I think it is still regarded as generally biologically clean, and the increase in people drinking bottled water is to do with concerns (real or hyped) about chlorine, fluoride and the like other contaminants used to clean it. And it's fashionable.

    Ironically, they probably get as bad or worse from the plastics in their water bottles.

    England I’ve heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.
     
    I can confirm that this was the case. I grew up in a house with an open overhead tank in the attic for water supplied to a heating cylinder used for washing and heating. They've mostly been replaced now by boilers that heat the water as it comes through under mains pressure, so that there's no concern about possible contamination of a tank, although I think quite a lot of older properties still have the open tank system (my mother, who died last year, lived in one right up to the end).

    I suppose that was a reflection of the undoubted difference in living standards from the US, meaning it took longer to replace the old open tanks. Presumably Americans must have used them to pressurise their hot water as well, in the early days.
    , @for-the-record
    England I’ve heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks

    That explanation may have been true at one time, but separate taps are still quite common even in public places (e.g., Gatwick Airport).

    In the 1990s I worked with UK architects and engineers on various refurbishment projects (in former Soviet Union) and had to continually overrule them when they proposed separate taps, their argument being that mixing taps were unreliable (perhaps UK ones were).
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  160. @Greasy William
    so you oppose Yeltsin's economic reforms?

    reforms

    That’s a curious way to spell organised theft and legalised plunder.

    Read More
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  161. @songbird
    Interesting. Under the old terminology that would place Communist Poland in the Second World. Basically, a place with societal order, but not the same standard of living. Perhaps, it is not as good a metric as I supposed.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    England I've heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.

    Some people still drink bottled water here because our tap water was not very safe at all times, especially in the post-1990 collapse of any and all standards in the name of privatisation and ‘innovation’. However, there has been significant strides in the last 10 years alone as the state has re-established itself as a serious force and passed a large number of new laws. But perceptions change slow for some. The EU has been beneficial here, it needs to be said. The neoliberal elite in Poland are very submissive towards the EU, so when regulations are passed by the EU, many of the people who own private media and conglomerates are muted at best with their criticism. The EU itself didn’t do much arm-twisting, but it was the imprimatur that helped.

    In general, bottled water is a tremendous waste of resources. Some countries, especially the Nordic ones, have such clean tap water that it is even better than most bottled water. I remember reading a story some years ago about Swedish tap water essentially falling into that category. It is also much cheaper to consume per liter.

    How is it in the states? Do people have tap water? I saw a clip of Louis Black, the clip itself must be 15 years now, where he was lamenting that he had clean tap water as a kid growing up but this was now apparently impossible. He’s a guy prone to exaggerations, so I’m not sure how much of it was based in fact. Is it?

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    I'd generally consider the tap water pretty good in the US.

    There are caveats, of course. Some old streets may still have lead pipes. Very rarely, there was some sort of outbreak in a particular small city, among the immunocompromised, probably as the result of human error.

    Flint, Michigan made it into the news recently, like a year or two ago for lead seepage. I'm pretty sure that was caused by human error. I'm theorizing here, but probably affirmative action people at the treatment plant. The demographics of Flint have certainly changed dramatically.

    There was some controversy a few years back under Bush, where he reduced regulations (pretty high standard) in some remote areas with with wells and naturally occurring minerals, but I think that was much ado about nothing.

    California recently had a very big drought where its reservoirs were getting very low. It didn't have any recent build up of water infrastructure, even as its population has increased dramatically. Some see this as a sign that it is slowly turning Third World, as its population now is predominantly non-white. I'm not sure what to think though, as it was probably a rare drought.
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  162. songbird says:
    @German_reader

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.
     
    But by whom? Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.
    Certainly an appalling person though.

    Internal power-brokers. Bankers and early oligarchs. People who saw him as easy to control and profit from.

    He doesn’t seem like a charismatic figure that people just naturally get behind. I mean, he tried to commit suicide, and when he was younger lost a few of his fingers from playing with a grenade. Definitely, not a guy that inspires confidence in his ability to lead.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    Yeltsin had charizma and was a bright personality in the 1980s. In fact he was famous all his earlier life for a strong, rebellious and bipolar personality, which probably was contributor in his early mental illness and early, drunken collapse (he was only 60 years old when first became president, and yet soon started to lose himself).
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  163. songbird says:
    @Polish Perspective
    Some people still drink bottled water here because our tap water was not very safe at all times, especially in the post-1990 collapse of any and all standards in the name of privatisation and 'innovation'. However, there has been significant strides in the last 10 years alone as the state has re-established itself as a serious force and passed a large number of new laws. But perceptions change slow for some. The EU has been beneficial here, it needs to be said. The neoliberal elite in Poland are very submissive towards the EU, so when regulations are passed by the EU, many of the people who own private media and conglomerates are muted at best with their criticism. The EU itself didn't do much arm-twisting, but it was the imprimatur that helped.

    In general, bottled water is a tremendous waste of resources. Some countries, especially the Nordic ones, have such clean tap water that it is even better than most bottled water. I remember reading a story some years ago about Swedish tap water essentially falling into that category. It is also much cheaper to consume per liter.

    How is it in the states? Do people have tap water? I saw a clip of Louis Black, the clip itself must be 15 years now, where he was lamenting that he had clean tap water as a kid growing up but this was now apparently impossible. He's a guy prone to exaggerations, so I'm not sure how much of it was based in fact. Is it?

    I’d generally consider the tap water pretty good in the US.

    There are caveats, of course. Some old streets may still have lead pipes. Very rarely, there was some sort of outbreak in a particular small city, among the immunocompromised, probably as the result of human error.

    Flint, Michigan made it into the news recently, like a year or two ago for lead seepage. I’m pretty sure that was caused by human error. I’m theorizing here, but probably affirmative action people at the treatment plant. The demographics of Flint have certainly changed dramatically.

    There was some controversy a few years back under Bush, where he reduced regulations (pretty high standard) in some remote areas with with wells and naturally occurring minerals, but I think that was much ado about nothing.

    California recently had a very big drought where its reservoirs were getting very low. It didn’t have any recent build up of water infrastructure, even as its population has increased dramatically. Some see this as a sign that it is slowly turning Third World, as its population now is predominantly non-white. I’m not sure what to think though, as it was probably a rare drought.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    Relationship to the tap water in the US is different than in Europe. The US has higher standards and expectations. In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first. In the US nobody ever think of boiling it. In the US they get free glass of iced tap water in every restaurant. In Europe you pay for it and usually it is bottled water not tap water because it would have to be boiled first. It used to be mineral water with natural or artificial carbonation. The bottled non carbonated straight water with a guarantee that it is clean (bacteria free) is a more recent development which later also came to the US. Unfortunately this trend of bottled water is pushing out the tradition that you have a right to free glass of iced water. The right to ice water might be explained by the fact that America is much hotter and more humid in summer than Europe. Dehydration and heat stroke are more real here.
    , @utu
    I forgot to mention public water fountains in the US in schools, hospitals and basically everywhere. In the South separate water fountains for Whites and Colored people still in 1960s In Europe otoh I often saw signs at public faucets like at railway stations that water was Not Potable, i.e., not safe to drink. I have never seen a sign like that in the US.

    Sanitations of the cities was pretty horrible in Europe particularly during summers. The custom of summer vacation and spending it in the country to escape the diseases and heat was dictated by the fear of epidemics in the cities. Obviously for those who could afford it. Epidemics of cholera were a pretty common occurrence near Naples still in 1960s. Jews kept practicing it (zumer vakatsye) in the US. That's how the Borscht Belt in Catskills developed. Still Hassidim and Orthodox Jew practice it. Even in Switzerland where all Orthodox communities move to resorts like Davos or Arosa for a month or two in summer.
    , @RadicalCenter
    The drought is not over in Southern California. We still have a dangerously large number of people living here relative to the reliable supply of potable water, and our rainfall levels are still consistently below historical averages -- and below what our population requires.

    Californians can forestall the inevitable water riots and mass death by continuing to reduce our consumption per capita. But the neverending immigration into California -- both "legal" and illegal -- ensures that we will still end up with an inadequate water supply for our population.

    The really frightening thing is that we already don't have enough water to comfortably supply residential and drinking water to everyone and also supply CA's farms at the current level. So we'll have an unsolvable water shortage AND have to buy more of our food from farther away (at greater cost to our wallets and to air pollution from all the extra millions of truck trips).

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  164. Dmitry says:
    @Anatoly Karlin
    Correct. They were called "black realtors."

    Yeltsin was a complete scumbag at a personal level. Boorish, vain, not very bright, and increasingly, an alcoholic.

    Very much unlike Gorbachev - very intelligent, conscientious, treated his underlings well (everybody seems to agree on the latter). Tragically naive, though.

    PS. Funny video from the 1990s. Chad Chechen Warlord forces the Virgin Yeltsin to give up his seat.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX3-vIFw81k

    (Putin had him assassinated in 2004).

    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.

    The Americans have some funny stories about this, from when he first visited America, and was asking the American politicians famously stupid questions about how they could co-ordinate so many different kinds of restaurants in the same country, and things like that.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anatoly Karlin
    This must have been common to Soviet leaders, Egor Ligachev asked analogous questions on visiting New York.
    , @Felix Keverich

    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.
     
    Few Russians do. Consider it a part of Russian national character or something.

    I've been reading Admiral Martyanov's blog for fun, and it's hillarious how he thinks that missiles is what really makes a country a superpower. The dude is not stupid, but he has been living in the US for decades, never even bothered to understand how US economy works - the subject doesn't seem to interest him. He just "knows" it's going to collapse though - this is so Russian!

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  165. utu says:
    @songbird
    I'd generally consider the tap water pretty good in the US.

    There are caveats, of course. Some old streets may still have lead pipes. Very rarely, there was some sort of outbreak in a particular small city, among the immunocompromised, probably as the result of human error.

    Flint, Michigan made it into the news recently, like a year or two ago for lead seepage. I'm pretty sure that was caused by human error. I'm theorizing here, but probably affirmative action people at the treatment plant. The demographics of Flint have certainly changed dramatically.

    There was some controversy a few years back under Bush, where he reduced regulations (pretty high standard) in some remote areas with with wells and naturally occurring minerals, but I think that was much ado about nothing.

    California recently had a very big drought where its reservoirs were getting very low. It didn't have any recent build up of water infrastructure, even as its population has increased dramatically. Some see this as a sign that it is slowly turning Third World, as its population now is predominantly non-white. I'm not sure what to think though, as it was probably a rare drought.

    Relationship to the tap water in the US is different than in Europe. The US has higher standards and expectations. In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first. In the US nobody ever think of boiling it. In the US they get free glass of iced tap water in every restaurant. In Europe you pay for it and usually it is bottled water not tap water because it would have to be boiled first. It used to be mineral water with natural or artificial carbonation. The bottled non carbonated straight water with a guarantee that it is clean (bacteria free) is a more recent development which later also came to the US. Unfortunately this trend of bottled water is pushing out the tradition that you have a right to free glass of iced water. The right to ice water might be explained by the fact that America is much hotter and more humid in summer than Europe. Dehydration and heat stroke are more real here.

    Read More
    • Replies: @for-the-record
    In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first.</i

    That's odd. I've lived in Switzerland, UK, Ireland, France and Portugal and have yet to meet anyone who boils his water. And you can easily get tap water in restaurants, although in some more refined places this is looked down upon (but not for sanitary reasons).
    , @reiner Tor
    In Hungary and, to my knowledge, most (all?) of Western and Central Europe people drink tap water regularly. I personally drink tap water all the time, and drank it as a child already, in Hungary and in any first world country. I think in Romania you can run into problems. I wouldn't expect any problems in Slovakia (in fact, I did drink tap water in that country), Czechia, Poland, or similar countries.
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  166. Dmitry says:
    @songbird
    Internal power-brokers. Bankers and early oligarchs. People who saw him as easy to control and profit from.

    He doesn't seem like a charismatic figure that people just naturally get behind. I mean, he tried to commit suicide, and when he was younger lost a few of his fingers from playing with a grenade. Definitely, not a guy that inspires confidence in his ability to lead.

    Yeltsin had charizma and was a bright personality in the 1980s. In fact he was famous all his earlier life for a strong, rebellious and bipolar personality, which probably was contributor in his early mental illness and early, drunken collapse (he was only 60 years old when first became president, and yet soon started to lose himself).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitry
    In the 1980s (where he was in his 50s), he was still adequate, very direct and popular with audiences, even a stand up comedian and anedotist. Strange how he would become such a vegetable from ten years after this.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BydDpUCTelU

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  167. Randal says:
    @songbird
    Interesting. Under the old terminology that would place Communist Poland in the Second World. Basically, a place with societal order, but not the same standard of living. Perhaps, it is not as good a metric as I supposed.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    England I've heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    Certainly I grew up in England drinking tap water routinely and with more or less complete faith in it. I still do.

    I think it is still regarded as generally biologically clean, and the increase in people drinking bottled water is to do with concerns (real or hyped) about chlorine, fluoride and the like other contaminants used to clean it. And it’s fashionable.

    Ironically, they probably get as bad or worse from the plastics in their water bottles.

    England I’ve heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.

    I can confirm that this was the case. I grew up in a house with an open overhead tank in the attic for water supplied to a heating cylinder used for washing and heating. They’ve mostly been replaced now by boilers that heat the water as it comes through under mains pressure, so that there’s no concern about possible contamination of a tank, although I think quite a lot of older properties still have the open tank system (my mother, who died last year, lived in one right up to the end).

    I suppose that was a reflection of the undoubted difference in living standards from the US, meaning it took longer to replace the old open tanks. Presumably Americans must have used them to pressurise their hot water as well, in the early days.

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  168. utu says:
    @songbird
    I'd generally consider the tap water pretty good in the US.

    There are caveats, of course. Some old streets may still have lead pipes. Very rarely, there was some sort of outbreak in a particular small city, among the immunocompromised, probably as the result of human error.

    Flint, Michigan made it into the news recently, like a year or two ago for lead seepage. I'm pretty sure that was caused by human error. I'm theorizing here, but probably affirmative action people at the treatment plant. The demographics of Flint have certainly changed dramatically.

    There was some controversy a few years back under Bush, where he reduced regulations (pretty high standard) in some remote areas with with wells and naturally occurring minerals, but I think that was much ado about nothing.

    California recently had a very big drought where its reservoirs were getting very low. It didn't have any recent build up of water infrastructure, even as its population has increased dramatically. Some see this as a sign that it is slowly turning Third World, as its population now is predominantly non-white. I'm not sure what to think though, as it was probably a rare drought.

    I forgot to mention public water fountains in the US in schools, hospitals and basically everywhere. In the South separate water fountains for Whites and Colored people still in 1960s In Europe otoh I often saw signs at public faucets like at railway stations that water was Not Potable, i.e., not safe to drink. I have never seen a sign like that in the US.

    Sanitations of the cities was pretty horrible in Europe particularly during summers. The custom of summer vacation and spending it in the country to escape the diseases and heat was dictated by the fear of epidemics in the cities. Obviously for those who could afford it. Epidemics of cholera were a pretty common occurrence near Naples still in 1960s. Jews kept practicing it (zumer vakatsye) in the US. That’s how the Borscht Belt in Catskills developed. Still Hassidim and Orthodox Jew practice it. Even in Switzerland where all Orthodox communities move to resorts like Davos or Arosa for a month or two in summer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @songbird
    It's pretty startling how high child mortality was in US cities only about a 100 years ago or so. One of my G grandfathers - probably not typical - lost 8 or 9 children, mostly in the 1890s. Some were from these summer epidemics - hot and humid days. There was meningitis. One later died from the Spanish Flu.

    Makes any possible future dystopia seem pretty grim, if it means we were returning to that sort of thing or worse.
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  169. Dmitry says:
    @Dmitry
    Yeltsin had charizma and was a bright personality in the 1980s. In fact he was famous all his earlier life for a strong, rebellious and bipolar personality, which probably was contributor in his early mental illness and early, drunken collapse (he was only 60 years old when first became president, and yet soon started to lose himself).

    In the 1980s (where he was in his 50s), he was still adequate, very direct and popular with audiences, even a stand up comedian and anedotist. Strange how he would become such a vegetable from ten years after this.

    Read More
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  170. utu says:

    More strikes at Syria

    Syrian air defenses respond to missiles over Homs province – state media

    https://www.rt.com/news/424333-syria-missiles-defense-homs/

    The raid in Homs countryside reportedly coincided with another missile attack against a military airbase near Damascus. According to various Arabic media channels, three missiles targeted Al Dumayr airport, but they were all allegedly downed by the Syrian air defenses.

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  171. There is some serious craziness going on between Israel and Syria right now. Syria is getting blasted but it sounds like there may have been some kind of attack against Israeli positions on the Golan.

    Hopefully this leads to a regional war.

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  172. Dmitry says:
    @Greasy William
    I wish the Jewish people had a leader as great as Yeltsin.

    If Yeltsin resurrected and wanted to convert, I would definitely support him being Israel's PM.

    ...

    If it wasn't for Yeltsin this blog wouldn't even exist because Russia would be a backward shithole with a 5k per capita GDP and nobody would care about it.

    I wish the Jewish people had a leader as great as Yeltsin.

    If Yeltsin resurrected and wanted to convert, I would definitely support him being Israel’s PM.

    Well Americans cannot vote in Israel elections (and only few vote in Russian elections). Which is probably good news for both countries in this case :)

    Yeltsin was just a vegetable by the end.

    If it wasn’t for Yeltsin this blog wouldn’t even exist because Russia would be a backward shithole with a 5k per capita GDP and nobody would care about it.

    Not really possible – the economy mainly grew in a turbo-charged way simply because of the commodity super-cycle – above all around ten times increase in the price of oil from 1998-2007.

    There are few scenarios in which the country could not get rich under such circumstances, although to the positive credit of Putin’s first two terms, he has managed government budget with austerity despite this.

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  173. iffen says:
    @Daniel Chieh
    Homocides recorded in Russia in 1994:

    47,870

    Homocides recorded in Russia in 2017:

    8,844

    Homocides recorded in Russia in 1994: 47,870

    Well, that’s one way to deal with the homo problem.

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  174. anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Polish Perspective

    Also I don’t care overly much about it either
     
    You seem to take it as an important indicator of general poz, though. One of my arguments on homosexuality is that I don't see much of a correlation between it and attitudes on diversity and immigration. Russia itself is a great example of that. Czech Republic is the polar opposite. By far the most-pro gay country in EE, yet also one of the best on immigration.

    The same argument extends to religiosity. One could take the US, which certainly in the 60s and 70s was arguably the most religious Western country, aside from perhaps Italy, by far. Yet all that religion didn't help them in resisting and/or overturning the 1965 immigration act.

    One could look at Turkey vs China for another comparison. Erdogan is pushing Islamism in an already very religious(by Western standards) country but has relatively open borders policies. China is an atheist country*, but its immigration policies make the Japanese look meek. When it comes to religion and homosexuality, both bête noires for many on the dissident right, I find both to have weak to nonexistent predictive value.

    *ancestry worship is quite popular in China and certainly constitutes a form of religion, but the question remains exactly how one should draw the threshold of when it becomes an organised religion, if ever.

    China is an atheist country

    I wouldn’t call China an atheist country. 31% of the population has some kind of religious belief, with 21 million Muslims, 61 million Christians, 245 million Buddhists, and millions of others. Go to any Taoist temple in China and you would see hordes of people burn incense and pray sincerely.

    Muslim in Shanghai, China. Took over the streets to pray.

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  175. @utu
    Relationship to the tap water in the US is different than in Europe. The US has higher standards and expectations. In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first. In the US nobody ever think of boiling it. In the US they get free glass of iced tap water in every restaurant. In Europe you pay for it and usually it is bottled water not tap water because it would have to be boiled first. It used to be mineral water with natural or artificial carbonation. The bottled non carbonated straight water with a guarantee that it is clean (bacteria free) is a more recent development which later also came to the US. Unfortunately this trend of bottled water is pushing out the tradition that you have a right to free glass of iced water. The right to ice water might be explained by the fact that America is much hotter and more humid in summer than Europe. Dehydration and heat stroke are more real here.

    In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first.</i

    That's odd. I've lived in Switzerland, UK, Ireland, France and Portugal and have yet to meet anyone who boils his water. And you can easily get tap water in restaurants, although in some more refined places this is looked down upon (but not for sanitary reasons).

    Read More
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  176. @songbird
    Interesting. Under the old terminology that would place Communist Poland in the Second World. Basically, a place with societal order, but not the same standard of living. Perhaps, it is not as good a metric as I supposed.

    It is funny how many in the West drink bottled water. IMO, Germany has an especial phobia of tap. Maybe, because of the war.

    England I've heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks. I think that reflects back on the formerly lower standard of living Brits had compared to the US.

    England I’ve heard has separate taps for hot and cold by law, because hot was considered not potable as rats and things would sometimes fall into the open-top hotwater tanks

    That explanation may have been true at one time, but separate taps are still quite common even in public places (e.g., Gatwick Airport).

    In the 1990s I worked with UK architects and engineers on various refurbishment projects (in former Soviet Union) and had to continually overrule them when they proposed separate taps, their argument being that mixing taps were unreliable (perhaps UK ones were).

    Read More
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  177. @Mr. Hack
    Your comment seems to be in reply to Karlin's description of a recent meeting with 'AP' in Moscow? Your biography within your new blog, https://joshuadelamere.wordpress.com/, seems different than the one I've been able to piece together for 'AP' at Dr. Motyl's former blog, this one and Karlin's former solo blog. Are you indeed 'AP' the analytical commenter of Ukrainian descent that I've been following and corresponding with for the last several years?...

    AK: No, they have nothing in common with each other. And please, no attempts to "guess" the identities of people who want to remain anonymous on my blog. Thanks.

    As AK says, I am not the same person…I was just replying to AK kindly linking my blog, that’s all. I’ll probably spill biographical info as I go along, but yes, I remain anonymous because I can’t quit my day job yet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Hack
    I wasn't trying to undress your true identity, anymore than I was AP's. I use a moniker myself and respect the privacy of all who choose to write under such an arrangement. What Karlin doesn't understand, is that I've been communicating with AP for several years, at this blog and at others, where AP has used different monikers. AP is one of the better commentators at this blog, and it wouldn't be at all surprising that he'd possibly want to start his own blog. There were several 'false flags' that he possibly could be you (I explain this in comment #53). After I found your blog, however, although impressed with what you have to say, your writing style is different than AP's, thus my confusion.

    Anyway, I'm glad that I found your blog and indeed will read it with interest (I have an undergraduate degree in European history). I hope that you write something about Ukraine's role as a colony (or something very similar to one) within the Russian empire and the Soviet Union, a place for which I hold a special interest!
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  178. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Swedish Family

    The amount of true lesbians – hate all men, even if Fabio is hitting on them – is probably low. Most hate men because they have been rejected by men.
     
    My experience is that true butch lesbians -- easily recognized by their lack of sexual dimorphism, think Rachel Maddow -- are very obviously uninterested in men. Lipsticks are another matter, of course.

    I am certain that the percentage of lesbians is increasing

    I imagine a lot of them are non-practising lesbians. In fact the majority of lesbians are probably non-practising lesbians. Lesbians aren’t into sex. They prefer other leisure activities, like emotional game-playing.

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  179. @AP

    I got the opportunity to meet up with commenter AP this week. Had a very pleasant conversation with him, if a pretty short one as was necessitated by his busy schedule.
     
    Likewise. I am back in the states, having left Paradise.

    Overall impression has been very positive. Moscow continues to improve. Sobyanin has done an excellent job, and no Muscovite I talked to had complaints about him, despite some having been suspicious at first because he was not a native. City is very clean, very safe, full of life. Decorations for Easter were very pretty.

    Theater was excellent, as always.

    Food was very good, though I tended to eat at home with family and friends.

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s, works in what I'll vaguely describe as law enforcement, got into a management position, and now with his meager official government salary owns 2 Moscow flats, a dacha, and a summer home on the Black Sea. A very inspiring rags to riches story of the Putin era. He is a huge fan of VV.

    My closest friends voted for Titov. Not because they liked him, but they disliked everyone else more.

    I saw very few Caucasians in the city center, and outside the center on the north side. But, many more Central Asians. This is an improvement. No skinheads or expressions of Nazism, also an improvement. My aunt (totally different branch of the family), daughter of a very well-known Soviet actor whom I won't name, recently took the Metro for the first time in 30 years. She went very early, in order to avoid crowds and noticed that she and her friend were the only Russians on the car - everyone else was a Tadjik. Her comment - "where was I, Paris or something?"

    Minor complaint: more Muscovites are casually dressed and informal than they used to be. Many more jeans and sneakers. Previously Moscow had defied this Western trend and its people looked proudly Mad Men well-dressed and formal. They aren't wearing pajamas in public yet, but it is a decline.

    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <– that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!

    I don't get why Karlin would like this post. But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <– that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!
     
    1. My cousin living so well is not a myth. Nor is he alone, an exception. The higher one goes up, the worse it becomes. And unlike China, where some even get shot, in Russia they sometimes resign and get hired again even if they are caught. Look at the career of Serdyukov:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoliy_Serdyukov

    How many Serdyukovs have been imprisoned as occurs to such types in China? I can think of Ulyukaev, who happened to cross Putin. Compare to China:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-corruption_campaign_under_Xi_Jinping

    Upon taking office, Xi vowed to crack down on "tigers and flies", that is, high-level officials and local civil servants alike. Most of the officials investigated were removed from office and faced accusations of bribery and abuse of power, although the range of alleged abuses varied widely. As of 2016, the campaign has 'netted' over 120 high-ranking officials, including about a dozen high-ranking military officers, several senior executives of state-owned companies, and five national leaders

    You think that Putin's elite is a lot cleaner than the Chinese one?

    :::::::::::::::

    That having been said, stuff like police shakedowns of regular people and businesses seems to quite rare.

    2. I didn't claim "hordes" but quite a few, perhaps 10% or so. I stayed at a hotel nearer the airport the last night. All the housekeepers I saw were central Asians. Large % of workers in, say, the fast food court at Okhotniy Ryad (including at the Georgian restaurant) were central Asians. Lots of people doing construction - Central Asians. I used a taxi 4 times - twice, Central Asians. Central Asians are kind of like Moscow's Mexicans. There are more of them in Moscow than in 2013. There are also far fewer Caucasians. Nothing mythical about this.

    But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.
     
    1. I'm not a nationalist. You seem to be, though.

    2 You whine about needing safe spaces rather often.
    , @Anatoly Karlin
    Well, I like AP's post because it offers an honest independent viewpoint on Moscow, which are always interesting.

    I also don't quite see why you think it consists of Ukrainian nationalist myths.

    1. Overall impressions are very positive. AP has in fact said that Moscow is his favorite metropolis on Earth. This is most definitely not what a svidomy would say.

    2. I can't judge the Caucasian/Central Asian ratio relative to what it was 5 years ago because I wasn't in Moscow five years ago.

    However, his observations are plausible. Staff at airports, etc. are indeed overwhelmingly Central Asian, you'd have to be blind not to notice that. Though people I talk to say there were considerably more of them prior to 2014 than today, and these observations make sense in light of the 2014 devaluation. This is probably the one issue here that I would quibble with AP on.

    His aunt's impressions are tilted by the fact that she went on the Metro very early. Who goes on the Metro very early? 1. People with utilities type jobs; 2. People who have an early flight. So, that's overwhelmingly (1). What are their demographics? Heavily Gastarbeiter, i.e. Central Asian.

    Incidentally, I am always amazed that there are people in Moscow who don't use the Metro (like AP's aunt). I don't know how you'd survive without it unless you're just permanently hunkered up in your apartment. But I actually know at least two people with similar profiles (i.e. who haven't used the Metro in years).

    3. His relatives are in the elite center of Moscow, which as you know is also where support for Putin falls while being one of the few places in Russia where support for liberals is not entirely negligible. This is perfectly plausible.

    As for the person with a managerial position in law enforcement who is living well beyond his apparent means... well, these people are a dime a dozen in Russia. Is this supposed to be incredible, or something? This is typical throughout the ex-USSR (except the Baltics and perhaps now Georgia), including the Ukraine.
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  180. @Dmitry
    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.

    The Americans have some funny stories about this, from when he first visited America, and was asking the American politicians famously stupid questions about how they could co-ordinate so many different kinds of restaurants in the same country, and things like that.

    This must have been common to Soviet leaders, Egor Ligachev asked analogous questions on visiting New York.

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  181. @Dmitry
    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.

    The Americans have some funny stories about this, from when he first visited America, and was asking the American politicians famously stupid questions about how they could co-ordinate so many different kinds of restaurants in the same country, and things like that.

    Gorbachev has no understanding of economics or how free market economy works.

    Few Russians do. Consider it a part of Russian national character or something.

    I’ve been reading Admiral Martyanov’s blog for fun, and it’s hillarious how he thinks that missiles is what really makes a country a superpower. The dude is not stupid, but he has been living in the US for decades, never even bothered to understand how US economy works – the subject doesn’t seem to interest him. He just “knows” it’s going to collapse though – this is so Russian!

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  182. Rifleman says:
    @Mr. XYZ
    @German_reader: Agreed that West Germans are more xenophilic than East Germans are. However, it's interesting that Angela Merkel is from East Germany and yet was the one who opened Germany's doors to a million Muslims in 2015-2016.

    Agreed that West Germans are more xenophilic than East Germans are. However, it’s interesting that Angela Merkel is from East Germany and yet was the one who opened Germany’s doors to a million Muslims in 2015-2016.

    Because she’s an ugly old, childless hag who hates German nationalism and probably has some subconscious desire for revenge against Western Germany.

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  183. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <-- that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!

    I don't get why Karlin would like this post. But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.

    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <– that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!

    1. My cousin living so well is not a myth. Nor is he alone, an exception. The higher one goes up, the worse it becomes. And unlike China, where some even get shot, in Russia they sometimes resign and get hired again even if they are caught. Look at the career of Serdyukov:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoliy_Serdyukov

    How many Serdyukovs have been imprisoned as occurs to such types in China? I can think of Ulyukaev, who happened to cross Putin. Compare to China:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-corruption_campaign_under_Xi_Jinping

    Upon taking office, Xi vowed to crack down on “tigers and flies”, that is, high-level officials and local civil servants alike. Most of the officials investigated were removed from office and faced accusations of bribery and abuse of power, although the range of alleged abuses varied widely. As of 2016, the campaign has ‘netted’ over 120 high-ranking officials, including about a dozen high-ranking military officers, several senior executives of state-owned companies, and five national leaders

    You think that Putin’s elite is a lot cleaner than the Chinese one?

    :::::::::::::::

    That having been said, stuff like police shakedowns of regular people and businesses seems to quite rare.

    2. I didn’t claim “hordes” but quite a few, perhaps 10% or so. I stayed at a hotel nearer the airport the last night. All the housekeepers I saw were central Asians. Large % of workers in, say, the fast food court at Okhotniy Ryad (including at the Georgian restaurant) were central Asians. Lots of people doing construction – Central Asians. I used a taxi 4 times – twice, Central Asians. Central Asians are kind of like Moscow’s Mexicans. There are more of them in Moscow than in 2013. There are also far fewer Caucasians. Nothing mythical about this.

    But then, I don’t get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.

    1. I’m not a nationalist. You seem to be, though.

    2 You whine about needing safe spaces rather often.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Yes, because "not a nationalist" is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?
    , @Duke of Qin
    I think the problem with Russia is that the political parties are weak and undisciplined. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong or perhaps Anatoly will, but it seems to me that United Russia is basically the party of Putin rather than Putin being the representative of the Party. China has only half abandoned Marxism-Leninism. Marxism may no longer guide economic decision making, but China firmly remains a one party Leninist-state. What this means in effect is that the Party rules over all and all party members must follow the dictates of the party, or else. The Hu Jintao interregnum saw a slacking of party discipline and growth in political decentralization and political liberalism similar to the Perestroika era Soviet Union. What this resulted in was both growing corruption and more critically the inability of government to push top level policy down to lower levels as lower level cadres felt free to be obstructionist if they felt party dictates interfered with their own local prerogatives. This is both good and bad in that it prevents disastrous policies from being felt in force because its application will be both unenthusiastic and resisted at numerous bureaucratic levels but it also makes state policy highly resistant to changes to the status quo and inevitably results in decentralization of power and policy drift/paralysis. What Xi Jinping has done in his first five year tenure is forcefully restored the centrality of the Communist Party in all the affairs of state. In other words what the party says is law and you better fucking do it or else.

    To quote Xi

    Why must we stand firm on the party's leadership over the military? Because that's the lesson from the collapse of the Soviet Union. In Soviet Union, where the military was depoliticized, separated from the party and nationalized, the party was disarmed. When the country came to crisis point, a big party was gone just like that. Proportionally, the Soviet Communist Party had more members than we (Communist Party of China) do, but nobody was man enough to stand up and resist.
     

    To dismiss the history of the Soviet Union and the Soviet Communist Party, to dismiss Lenin and Stalin, and to dismiss everything else is to engage in historic nihilism, and it confuses our thoughts and undermines the party’s organizations on all levels.
     
    The differences in ability to implement policy I think is best reflected in how China and Russia choose to handle the issue of restive Muslims. Putin has basically decided to do pacification on the cheap by empowering a local Muslim strongman, Kadyrov, to keep the other Muslims in line and pay him for the efforts. This policy can be said to work in that it keeps Chechnya quiescent for now but it is not a long term permanent solution and it does nothing to address Sunni radicalization. Xinjiang's Muslims basically amount to around 12 million Muslims, about 8x greater than Chechnya I think and are relatively similar proportion of China's population as Chechens are to Russians. Instead of a hands off approach, the Chinese Communist Party under Xi has went after them with an iron fist. 10% of the population has passed through newly established "Re-education" camps with hundreds of thousands inhabiting them long term. All unemployed men rounded up and sent to the camps. All Muslims who have traveled abroad to other Muslim states arrested. Communist Party cadres sent into the homes of Muslim families to sleep and live there. All older Korans confiscated and replaced with new "revised" editions. Mosques demolished or "renovated" to be less Arabic in style and more Chinese. Existing mosques had their minarets torn down, party and national flags raised to prominent position, their entrances defaced with prominent Communist Party propaganda slogans. Mandatory atheism education in school and children banned from religious instruction. In one instance, a Communist Party cadre was disciplined and demoted for putting out a cigarette when he entered a mosque. His error was failure to established the ultimate supremacy of the Communist Party State and actually respecting local custom when the Party wants everyone to know that their religious values are worthless and powerless. All of this backed up by massive security presence and surveillance apparatus that would have made the Stazi green with envy. All of these activities has to the contrary of Western liberals idea of "inflaming" of Islamic radicalism instead scared them shitless and totally cowed them. All the more impressive is that the state has mobilized the local Muslims in their own surveillance and Muslim cadres are forced into compliance of Party anti-Muslim policies.

    This is the degree of raw power that a Leninist Chinese Communist Party still posses, the Soviet Union used to possess, and Putin's Russia simply doesn't. I do not think it would be possible for United Russia to bring such a massive degree of coercion on both it's own members (to get them off their asses) and restive Muslims even if Putin wanted to. This is I think Putin's biggest failure in that he has built up no institutional levers to exercise executive authority and thus Russian policy implementation is completely dependent on his own personal charisma which will not outlive him.
    , @Gerard2

    How many Serdyukovs have been imprisoned as occurs to such types in China? I can think of Ulyukaev, who happened to cross Putin. Compare to China:
     
    err.....numerous governors and ex governors, a ton of cabinet ministers in oblast level, deputy Culture minister ,Mayors, etecetera have been arrested and imprisoned...1000 officials in Russia last year alone were sacked for corruption you ignorant dipshit.

    Unlike in cesspit Ukraine which does the same thing, the President of Russia appointing the governor is not an authoritarian move (due to the complex composition and form of Russia), as such these arrests aren't a cronyism fight as they are with the ( very few in the abysmally corrupt) Ukraine with Poroshenko



    errmmm.....Ulyukaev in no way crossed Putin you dumb POS.
    A huge amount of very high ranking guys in the FSB, MVD , and Investigate Commitee have been arrested and imprisoned
    there has also been quite a few deaths in custody of these guys
    Roskosmos,FCIN...I could go on and on

    Now compare this to Ukraine which, since the Nazi-coup has in fact tried to exact copy Russia's fight against corruption but failed miserably

    So you know even less about Russian politics then you do about "Ukrainian" politics of "Ukraine " in general.....what a messed-up idiot


    ...and proportionally , in the last 5 years, there have far more anti-corruption arrests in Russia, and high profile corruption arrests...then in China...and it weights up far more in an open society like Russia.
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  184. @AP

    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <– that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!
     
    1. My cousin living so well is not a myth. Nor is he alone, an exception. The higher one goes up, the worse it becomes. And unlike China, where some even get shot, in Russia they sometimes resign and get hired again even if they are caught. Look at the career of Serdyukov:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatoliy_Serdyukov

    How many Serdyukovs have been imprisoned as occurs to such types in China? I can think of Ulyukaev, who happened to cross Putin. Compare to China:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-corruption_campaign_under_Xi_Jinping

    Upon taking office, Xi vowed to crack down on "tigers and flies", that is, high-level officials and local civil servants alike. Most of the officials investigated were removed from office and faced accusations of bribery and abuse of power, although the range of alleged abuses varied widely. As of 2016, the campaign has 'netted' over 120 high-ranking officials, including about a dozen high-ranking military officers, several senior executives of state-owned companies, and five national leaders

    You think that Putin's elite is a lot cleaner than the Chinese one?

    :::::::::::::::

    That having been said, stuff like police shakedowns of regular people and businesses seems to quite rare.

    2. I didn't claim "hordes" but quite a few, perhaps 10% or so. I stayed at a hotel nearer the airport the last night. All the housekeepers I saw were central Asians. Large % of workers in, say, the fast food court at Okhotniy Ryad (including at the Georgian restaurant) were central Asians. Lots of people doing construction - Central Asians. I used a taxi 4 times - twice, Central Asians. Central Asians are kind of like Moscow's Mexicans. There are more of them in Moscow than in 2013. There are also far fewer Caucasians. Nothing mythical about this.

    But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.
     
    1. I'm not a nationalist. You seem to be, though.

    2 You whine about needing safe spaces rather often.

    Yes, because “not a nationalist” is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?

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    • Replies: @Mikhail
    Agree.

    Besides, the matter of "like" and "dislike" can be noticeably relative. It's possible to dislike an athlete, actor or whoever, while acknowledging their excellent professional talent. That observation goes for politicians as well.

    A good number of folks voted for Trump, not liking his manner, while believing he was worth a shot on account of what the Dems offered. Unfortunately, events now have some in that group of Trump supporters wondering if they made a wise choice?

    As for Putin, numerous polls indicate that he's quite "popular" in Russia, which reasonably means popular in his role as president.
    , @AP

    Yes, because “not a nationalist” is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.
     
    I notice what I see. What does this have to do with nationalism? Is everyone who notices a number of Arabs in Paris some sort of nationalist?

    You are projecting, Nationalist.

    Do you think my observations are mistaken, or even dishonest? If you are in Moscow, see who drives the Taxis. Who cleans the hotel rooms, works at construction sites, serves fast food. Doing the sorts of things Mexicans do. My estimate of 10% of the city being Central Asian is probably pretty close to the actual number. Portland OR is about 10% Mexican, so Moscow is about as Mexican as is Portland. It's no LA. This is btw, much preferable to the situation in any western European big city.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?
     
    I simply relayed what my family and friends thought of the man. Obviously this is not representative of the country as a whole. As my Titov-voting friend observed - the less one knows about what's happening in the country, the more one likes Putin. With the exception of those who milk the country within the Putinist system, and are accordingly and understandably loyal to it and to the man who keeps it going..
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  185. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/16/us/politics/trump-rejects-sanctions-russia-syria.amp.html

    “Russia did not respond militarily to the Friday strike, but American officials noted a sharp spike in Russian online activity around the time it was launched.
    A snapshot on Friday night recorded a 2,000 percent increase in Russian troll activity overall, according to Tyler Q. Houlton, a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security. One known Russian bot, #SyriaStrikes, had a 4,443 percent increase in activity while another, #Damsucs, saw a 2,800 percent jump, Mr. Houlton said.”

    It didn’t occur to them that Russians would be naturally turning to online forums and Twitter etc. right after the news (and the missiles) struck. I mean, that’s what normal humans who are interested in such news stories do.

    The tinfoil hat is strong with The New York Times and the American officials.

    (The article again shows how it’s very difficult for Trump to even slow down the pace of the anti-Russian policy. I can’t understand how people could be arguing that Trump would be politically able to make a grand bargain with Russia.)

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    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Let's not forget that this anti-Russian policy is coming from Trump's own staff. Nobody forced him to bring in Bolton (For the love of God, Bolton?! Why??) as his NSA. Nikki Haley used to be waste management company CFO, before becoming affirmative-action GOP governor. Suddenly, she is in charge of the administration's Russia policy. Nikki Haley announces her new anti-Russian sanctions, and the president is forced to disavow her.

    Trump admin is a remarkable combination of incompetence and outright crazy, but it was Trump himself, who appointed these people. That makes him the dumbest and craziest of them all.
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  186. @reiner Tor
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/16/us/politics/trump-rejects-sanctions-russia-syria.amp.html

    “Russia did not respond militarily to the Friday strike, but American officials noted a sharp spike in Russian online activity around the time it was launched.
    A snapshot on Friday night recorded a 2,000 percent increase in Russian troll activity overall, according to Tyler Q. Houlton, a spokesman for the Department of Homeland Security. One known Russian bot, #SyriaStrikes, had a 4,443 percent increase in activity while another, #Damsucs, saw a 2,800 percent jump, Mr. Houlton said.”


    It didn’t occur to them that Russians would be naturally turning to online forums and Twitter etc. right after the news (and the missiles) struck. I mean, that’s what normal humans who are interested in such news stories do.

    The tinfoil hat is strong with The New York Times and the American officials.

    (The article again shows how it’s very difficult for Trump to even slow down the pace of the anti-Russian policy. I can’t understand how people could be arguing that Trump would be politically able to make a grand bargain with Russia.)

    Let’s not forget that this anti-Russian policy is coming from Trump’s own staff. Nobody forced him to bring in Bolton (For the love of God, Bolton?! Why??) as his NSA. Nikki Haley used to be waste management company CFO, before becoming affirmative-action GOP governor. Suddenly, she is in charge of the administration’s Russia policy. Nikki Haley announces her new anti-Russian sanctions, and the president is forced to disavow her.

    Trump admin is a remarkable combination of incompetence and outright crazy, but it was Trump himself, who appointed these people. That makes him the dumbest and craziest of them all.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Yes, but those criticizing him for collusion aren't in his staff. He couldn't pull it off even if he weren't himself crazy, and if he didn't appoint crazies. It matters very little because anyway he's among the craziest.
    , @utu
    I keep trying to answer the question about Trump and the mechanism explaining how things unfold with him:

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/ww3/#comment-2286836
    The fantasy that Trump is “fighting some nebulous Deep State” might be just a disinformation meme spread by Breitbart and other Zionist outfits while Israel and its goals were the real objectives from the day one. Many Trump fanboys eat it up and keep hoping against hope. Hope dies last after all. People running on hope alone are very vulnerable to manipulation.

    The only pre-election promises that Trump has kept were (1) be good to Israel and (2) be bad to Iran. I have noticed that Breitbart was very critical of McMaster and was very lukewarm on Tillerson for no specific reason. But apparently they had to go and be replaced with Bolton and Pompeo to proceed to the next phase of being good to Israel.

    The question one may ask is to what extent Trump is a willful participant or whether he is just within a funnel that was designed and built for around him by the neocons and CIA while Mueller probe and Stormy Daniels are the piston that pushes him deeper and deeper into the funnel. It is possible that the Trump operation manual was written long time ago and now it is just being used
     
    The meme among democrats is "comprehensive strategy" which means that Trump should get even tougher on Syria and Russia:
    http://www.unz.com/video/ramzpaul_the-comprehensive-strategy-dance/

    Lindsay Graham also wants more:

    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/04/16/graham-syria-strikes-underwhelming-were-willing-to-give-syria-to-russia-and-iran-without-much-of-a-contest/
    “I think this was an underwhelming response. Assad did not pay a big price. And Russia and Iran heard our Pentagon go out of their way to make sure that we’re not going to get in a conflict with Russia and Iranians in Syria and the president announced that we’re leaving, as the missiles were flying, he announced we were leaving. I think this is a disaster for us in Syria.”
     
    It is bi-partisan. Trump probably does not know what and how everything is happening to him but he is being guided and pushed according to strategy designed still when he was running when some serious people created his profile and identified all leverages that can be used on him. It is possible that it was mostly done in Israel which was behind Trump candidacy. So, they created Trump Operations Manual (TOM) and they use it since with a great help of Democrats and media. It is possible that once they realized that using the Trump Operation Manual would be simple and almost full proof the Deep Sate opted for him and dumped Hillary and helped counting votes in November 2016. The realization that he would win dawned on some about 14-10 days before election. Comey's reopening of investigation on Hillary was the signal that Trump would win, but Hillary obsessed media did not decipher it.
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  187. @Felix Keverich
    Let's not forget that this anti-Russian policy is coming from Trump's own staff. Nobody forced him to bring in Bolton (For the love of God, Bolton?! Why??) as his NSA. Nikki Haley used to be waste management company CFO, before becoming affirmative-action GOP governor. Suddenly, she is in charge of the administration's Russia policy. Nikki Haley announces her new anti-Russian sanctions, and the president is forced to disavow her.

    Trump admin is a remarkable combination of incompetence and outright crazy, but it was Trump himself, who appointed these people. That makes him the dumbest and craziest of them all.

    Yes, but those criticizing him for collusion aren’t in his staff. He couldn’t pull it off even if he weren’t himself crazy, and if he didn’t appoint crazies. It matters very little because anyway he’s among the craziest.

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    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    I beg to differ. Trump could simply ignore the Resistance the way Obama ignored opposition to his Iran deal. Of course, he would still need the minimum amount of support from Republicans in Congress to get anything done. But this would require the minimum amount of people skills.
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  188. @Talha
    Yup - low living standards. I was discussing this with a brother recently. It's not necessarily that Africans have low living standards (well, they do in our age), rather certain other countries have living standards that are historically unheard of. For instance, an upper-middle class guy like me was put up in a normal hotel room by my company and I could adjust the temperature to within half a degree. When I go to the store to buy orange juice, I have not only multiple choices of brands but also which combo I want; orange with mango, strawberry, banana, etc. included - I just recently tasted some fruit I had never heard of before in my life. I can talk with my Mom right now if I want.

    None of the kings of Persia had anything close to this level of opulence. I would say it is unnatural. Part of being a human being are the historic struggles of being a human being. If you remove those, what happens...systemic failure? I don't know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.

    Peace.

    I don’t know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.

    Even my opulent American childhood looks poor compared to that of kids these days. Sometimes I waited a month until I got new shoes or a new coat. And I had to wait until Saturday morning to get my fill of cartoons. Now you point and click. Shoes and a coat are delivered in a box the next day, and any cartoon you want starts streaming.

    In my family, right now, I see only three checks on ego and appetite: 1) Orthodox Christian periods of fasting (similar to vegan diet, two days most weeks, and between two weeks and a month a few times a year), 2) living together as a family (to me, this is a big check on ego and appetite, since I have to constantly consider what my family needs rather than what I want), and 3) grit (we each have things that we want to accomplish and which require us to abstain from other things). So far, this keeps us from going completely off the rails. But I’m uncertain that it is enough, and I’m concerned about future generations. Already I am a grumpy old man, it seems…

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    • Replies: @Talha
    Bro, I have got the same concerns as you. I had a very similar upbringing as well. Since we were immigrants to the US, we did without a lot; just one present at birthdays, buying a bike on layaway, etc.

    I am looking forward to Ramadan this year probably more than any other. I cannot help but feel that this is not going to end well. I want to watch this documentary by Werner Herzog - I got to see the trailer:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zc1tZ8JsZvg

    When I saw the last scene with the monks, I started crying - literally bawling, I couldn't hold it back - a massive wave of horror and regret hit me all at once for what humanity has to lose as we cross the threshold...if we haven't already.

    Peace.
    , @S3
    Maybe you ought to do what Greg Cochran did and tell them to read up on WW2:

    westhunt.wordpress.com/2013/02/13/educating-ginny/

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  189. utu says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Let's not forget that this anti-Russian policy is coming from Trump's own staff. Nobody forced him to bring in Bolton (For the love of God, Bolton?! Why??) as his NSA. Nikki Haley used to be waste management company CFO, before becoming affirmative-action GOP governor. Suddenly, she is in charge of the administration's Russia policy. Nikki Haley announces her new anti-Russian sanctions, and the president is forced to disavow her.

    Trump admin is a remarkable combination of incompetence and outright crazy, but it was Trump himself, who appointed these people. That makes him the dumbest and craziest of them all.

    I keep trying to answer the question about Trump and the mechanism explaining how things unfold with him:

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/ww3/#comment-2286836
    The fantasy that Trump is “fighting some nebulous Deep State” might be just a disinformation meme spread by Breitbart and other Zionist outfits while Israel and its goals were the real objectives from the day one. Many Trump fanboys eat it up and keep hoping against hope. Hope dies last after all. People running on hope alone are very vulnerable to manipulation.

    The only pre-election promises that Trump has kept were (1) be good to Israel and (2) be bad to Iran. I have noticed that Breitbart was very critical of McMaster and was very lukewarm on Tillerson for no specific reason. But apparently they had to go and be replaced with Bolton and Pompeo to proceed to the next phase of being good to Israel.

    The question one may ask is to what extent Trump is a willful participant or whether he is just within a funnel that was designed and built for around him by the neocons and CIA while Mueller probe and Stormy Daniels are the piston that pushes him deeper and deeper into the funnel. It is possible that the Trump operation manual was written long time ago and now it is just being used

    The meme among democrats is “comprehensive strategy” which means that Trump should get even tougher on Syria and Russia:

    http://www.unz.com/video/ramzpaul_the-comprehensive-strategy-dance/

    Lindsay Graham also wants more:

    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/04/16/graham-syria-strikes-underwhelming-were-willing-to-give-syria-to-russia-and-iran-without-much-of-a-contest/
    “I think this was an underwhelming response. Assad did not pay a big price. And Russia and Iran heard our Pentagon go out of their way to make sure that we’re not going to get in a conflict with Russia and Iranians in Syria and the president announced that we’re leaving, as the missiles were flying, he announced we were leaving. I think this is a disaster for us in Syria.”

    It is bi-partisan. Trump probably does not know what and how everything is happening to him but he is being guided and pushed according to strategy designed still when he was running when some serious people created his profile and identified all leverages that can be used on him. It is possible that it was mostly done in Israel which was behind Trump candidacy. So, they created Trump Operations Manual (TOM) and they use it since with a great help of Democrats and media. It is possible that once they realized that using the Trump Operation Manual would be simple and almost full proof the Deep Sate opted for him and dumped Hillary and helped counting votes in November 2016. The realization that he would win dawned on some about 14-10 days before election. Comey’s reopening of investigation on Hillary was the signal that Trump would win, but Hillary obsessed media did not decipher it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    You're overthinking it. Israel could not have anticipated that "Build the Wall" will become a rallying cry for racially anxious whites in GOP primaries. And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general - there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump's candidacy every step of the way.
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  190. @AP

    I got the opportunity to meet up with commenter AP this week. Had a very pleasant conversation with him, if a pretty short one as was necessitated by his busy schedule.
     
    Likewise. I am back in the states, having left Paradise.

    Overall impression has been very positive. Moscow continues to improve. Sobyanin has done an excellent job, and no Muscovite I talked to had complaints about him, despite some having been suspicious at first because he was not a native. City is very clean, very safe, full of life. Decorations for Easter were very pretty.

    Theater was excellent, as always.

    Food was very good, though I tended to eat at home with family and friends.

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s, works in what I'll vaguely describe as law enforcement, got into a management position, and now with his meager official government salary owns 2 Moscow flats, a dacha, and a summer home on the Black Sea. A very inspiring rags to riches story of the Putin era. He is a huge fan of VV.

    My closest friends voted for Titov. Not because they liked him, but they disliked everyone else more.

    I saw very few Caucasians in the city center, and outside the center on the north side. But, many more Central Asians. This is an improvement. No skinheads or expressions of Nazism, also an improvement. My aunt (totally different branch of the family), daughter of a very well-known Soviet actor whom I won't name, recently took the Metro for the first time in 30 years. She went very early, in order to avoid crowds and noticed that she and her friend were the only Russians on the car - everyone else was a Tadjik. Her comment - "where was I, Paris or something?"

    Minor complaint: more Muscovites are casually dressed and informal than they used to be. Many more jeans and sneakers. Previously Moscow had defied this Western trend and its people looked proudly Mad Men well-dressed and formal. They aren't wearing pajamas in public yet, but it is a decline.

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s

    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.

    Nobody I know actually likes Putin, but the reasons vary from the totally absurd to the completely reasonable.

    I don’t know much about Titov, and probably wouldn’t like that type in another country, but I do think that Russia in particular really does need more and better business.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP

    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.
     
    My circles are not representative of the country. All Moscow-based, mostly graduates of MGU or MGMO, all kids of Soviet-era elite with the exception of my cousin. Not involved in government but close enough to those who are to have a good clue. My friends who voted for Titov said something like, "if Putin shot or even at least arrested a lot of people at the top like they do in China I would have voted for him." None of them like Sobchak either. Or Zhrinovsky, or the Communists. They really like Navalny's exposes but dismiss him as someone who either lives off Western grants or who is a CIA asset, would never vote for him. All like getting Crimea back, none give a damn about Donbas.
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  191. @reiner Tor
    Yes, but those criticizing him for collusion aren't in his staff. He couldn't pull it off even if he weren't himself crazy, and if he didn't appoint crazies. It matters very little because anyway he's among the craziest.

    I beg to differ. Trump could simply ignore the Resistance the way Obama ignored opposition to his Iran deal. Of course, he would still need the minimum amount of support from Republicans in Congress to get anything done. But this would require the minimum amount of people skills.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Perhaps. But he's in a much weaker position than Obama. There was zero chance the First Black President would be impeached for anything. With Trump, it's an actual possibility.
    , @utu
    Obama could afford it because it was toward the end of his 2nd term and he was really pissed with the lobby and Netanyahu. And he was surrounded by people who shared his ideas. While Trump is on the level that even he is not sure what are his ideas.

    Anyway, good that you brought up the Iran deal because it certainly was major accomplishment by Obama going against the most powerful lobby. No president succeed in doing anything like that since Eisenhower. We know what happens to Kennedy. Carter ended up one term president. And Bush Senior tried but lost his nerve and gave up and ended up being one term president.
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  192. @Felix Keverich
    I beg to differ. Trump could simply ignore the Resistance the way Obama ignored opposition to his Iran deal. Of course, he would still need the minimum amount of support from Republicans in Congress to get anything done. But this would require the minimum amount of people skills.

    Perhaps. But he’s in a much weaker position than Obama. There was zero chance the First Black President would be impeached for anything. With Trump, it’s an actual possibility.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Trump is only in a weaker position because of his managerial ineptitude. I don't know if Trump was always like this, or perhaps he is already going senile, but he doesn't seem to grasp what the job of the president entails.
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  193. @utu
    I keep trying to answer the question about Trump and the mechanism explaining how things unfold with him:

    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/ww3/#comment-2286836
    The fantasy that Trump is “fighting some nebulous Deep State” might be just a disinformation meme spread by Breitbart and other Zionist outfits while Israel and its goals were the real objectives from the day one. Many Trump fanboys eat it up and keep hoping against hope. Hope dies last after all. People running on hope alone are very vulnerable to manipulation.

    The only pre-election promises that Trump has kept were (1) be good to Israel and (2) be bad to Iran. I have noticed that Breitbart was very critical of McMaster and was very lukewarm on Tillerson for no specific reason. But apparently they had to go and be replaced with Bolton and Pompeo to proceed to the next phase of being good to Israel.

    The question one may ask is to what extent Trump is a willful participant or whether he is just within a funnel that was designed and built for around him by the neocons and CIA while Mueller probe and Stormy Daniels are the piston that pushes him deeper and deeper into the funnel. It is possible that the Trump operation manual was written long time ago and now it is just being used
     
    The meme among democrats is "comprehensive strategy" which means that Trump should get even tougher on Syria and Russia:
    http://www.unz.com/video/ramzpaul_the-comprehensive-strategy-dance/

    Lindsay Graham also wants more:

    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2018/04/16/graham-syria-strikes-underwhelming-were-willing-to-give-syria-to-russia-and-iran-without-much-of-a-contest/
    “I think this was an underwhelming response. Assad did not pay a big price. And Russia and Iran heard our Pentagon go out of their way to make sure that we’re not going to get in a conflict with Russia and Iranians in Syria and the president announced that we’re leaving, as the missiles were flying, he announced we were leaving. I think this is a disaster for us in Syria.”
     
    It is bi-partisan. Trump probably does not know what and how everything is happening to him but he is being guided and pushed according to strategy designed still when he was running when some serious people created his profile and identified all leverages that can be used on him. It is possible that it was mostly done in Israel which was behind Trump candidacy. So, they created Trump Operations Manual (TOM) and they use it since with a great help of Democrats and media. It is possible that once they realized that using the Trump Operation Manual would be simple and almost full proof the Deep Sate opted for him and dumped Hillary and helped counting votes in November 2016. The realization that he would win dawned on some about 14-10 days before election. Comey's reopening of investigation on Hillary was the signal that Trump would win, but Hillary obsessed media did not decipher it.

    You’re overthinking it. Israel could not have anticipated that “Build the Wall” will become a rallying cry for racially anxious whites in GOP primaries. And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general – there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump’s candidacy every step of the way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu

    Israel could not have anticipated that “Build the Wall”...
     
    I have a different take. Fence on Hungary-Serbia border:

    http://www.unz.com/article/what-the-alt-right-gets-wrong-about-jews/#comment-2257933
    , @iffen
    And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general – there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump’s candidacy every step of the way.

    SJWs, Dems (but I repeat myself) and the MSM (again) are the ones stirring the racial stew, not Trump.

    Oh, and BTW, Trump is an archetype “great” nationalist leader. He demands total loyalty to himself while at the same time has no qualms about throwing absolutely anyone (loyal or not) overboard whom he considers a danger to his objectives. The only fly in the ointment is that sometimes what is best for the “leader” diverges from what is best for the nation.
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  194. @reiner Tor
    Perhaps. But he's in a much weaker position than Obama. There was zero chance the First Black President would be impeached for anything. With Trump, it's an actual possibility.

    Trump is only in a weaker position because of his managerial ineptitude. I don’t know if Trump was always like this, or perhaps he is already going senile, but he doesn’t seem to grasp what the job of the president entails.

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Okay, Trump needs stronger managerial skills than Obama ever needed, because he's hated by the elites. I don't understand how that could be denied.

    Anyway, Trump is also personally crazy, so it doesn't matter much.
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  195. @Felix Keverich
    Trump is only in a weaker position because of his managerial ineptitude. I don't know if Trump was always like this, or perhaps he is already going senile, but he doesn't seem to grasp what the job of the president entails.

    Okay, Trump needs stronger managerial skills than Obama ever needed, because he’s hated by the elites. I don’t understand how that could be denied.

    Anyway, Trump is also personally crazy, so it doesn’t matter much.

    Read More
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  196. @Felix Keverich
    Horrible corruption under unpopular dictator Putin + hordes of Central Asians <-- that's 2, no, 3 Ukrainian nationalist myths about Russia in one post!

    I don't get why Karlin would like this post. But then, I don't get his idea of chatting up with Ukrainian nationalists either.

    Well, I like AP’s post because it offers an honest independent viewpoint on Moscow, which are always interesting.

    I also don’t quite see why you think it consists of Ukrainian nationalist myths.

    1. Overall impressions are very positive. AP has in fact said that Moscow is his favorite metropolis on Earth. This is most definitely not what a svidomy would say.

    2. I can’t judge the Caucasian/Central Asian ratio relative to what it was 5 years ago because I wasn’t in Moscow five years ago.

    However, his observations are plausible. Staff at airports, etc. are indeed overwhelmingly Central Asian, you’d have to be blind not to notice that. Though people I talk to say there were considerably more of them prior to 2014 than today, and these observations make sense in light of the 2014 devaluation. This is probably the one issue here that I would quibble with AP on.

    His aunt’s impressions are tilted by the fact that she went on the Metro very early. Who goes on the Metro very early? 1. People with utilities type jobs; 2. People who have an early flight. So, that’s overwhelmingly (1). What are their demographics? Heavily Gastarbeiter, i.e. Central Asian.

    Incidentally, I am always amazed that there are people in Moscow who don’t use the Metro (like AP’s aunt). I don’t know how you’d survive without it unless you’re just permanently hunkered up in your apartment. But I actually know at least two people with similar profiles (i.e. who haven’t used the Metro in years).

    3. His relatives are in the elite center of Moscow, which as you know is also where support for Putin falls while being one of the few places in Russia where support for liberals is not entirely negligible. This is perfectly plausible.

    As for the person with a managerial position in law enforcement who is living well beyond his apparent means… well, these people are a dime a dozen in Russia. Is this supposed to be incredible, or something? This is typical throughout the ex-USSR (except the Baltics and perhaps now Georgia), including the Ukraine.

    Read More
    • Agree: AP, Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    His "aunt" is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.

    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    An intelligent and well-travelled svidomy troll is still svidomy troll, and I'm surprised that you fall for his crap.
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  197. ussr andy says:
    @German_reader

    It is really surprising he ever came to power, and easy to believe the argument that he was placed into power.
     
    But by whom? Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.
    Certainly an appalling person though.

    >Ideas that he was a CIA agent or something of the sort seem rather bizarre to me.

    the USSR did suffer total ideological subversion of its elites, CIA or not.

    I blame cargo cultism.

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  198. utu says:
    @Felix Keverich
    You're overthinking it. Israel could not have anticipated that "Build the Wall" will become a rallying cry for racially anxious whites in GOP primaries. And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general - there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump's candidacy every step of the way.

    Israel could not have anticipated that “Build the Wall”…

    I have a different take. Fence on Hungary-Serbia border:

    http://www.unz.com/article/what-the-alt-right-gets-wrong-about-jews/#comment-2257933

    Read More
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  199. utu says:
    @Felix Keverich
    I beg to differ. Trump could simply ignore the Resistance the way Obama ignored opposition to his Iran deal. Of course, he would still need the minimum amount of support from Republicans in Congress to get anything done. But this would require the minimum amount of people skills.

    Obama could afford it because it was toward the end of his 2nd term and he was really pissed with the lobby and Netanyahu. And he was surrounded by people who shared his ideas. While Trump is on the level that even he is not sure what are his ideas.

    Anyway, good that you brought up the Iran deal because it certainly was major accomplishment by Obama going against the most powerful lobby. No president succeed in doing anything like that since Eisenhower. We know what happens to Kennedy. Carter ended up one term president. And Bush Senior tried but lost his nerve and gave up and ended up being one term president.

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  200. Mikhail says: • Website
    @Felix Keverich
    Yes, because "not a nationalist" is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?

    Agree.

    Besides, the matter of “like” and “dislike” can be noticeably relative. It’s possible to dislike an athlete, actor or whoever, while acknowledging their excellent professional talent. That observation goes for politicians as well.

    A good number of folks voted for Trump, not liking his manner, while believing he was worth a shot on account of what the Dems offered. Unfortunately, events now have some in that group of Trump supporters wondering if they made a wise choice?

    As for Putin, numerous polls indicate that he’s quite “popular” in Russia, which reasonably means popular in his role as president.

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  201. @Anatoly Karlin
    Well, I like AP's post because it offers an honest independent viewpoint on Moscow, which are always interesting.

    I also don't quite see why you think it consists of Ukrainian nationalist myths.

    1. Overall impressions are very positive. AP has in fact said that Moscow is his favorite metropolis on Earth. This is most definitely not what a svidomy would say.

    2. I can't judge the Caucasian/Central Asian ratio relative to what it was 5 years ago because I wasn't in Moscow five years ago.

    However, his observations are plausible. Staff at airports, etc. are indeed overwhelmingly Central Asian, you'd have to be blind not to notice that. Though people I talk to say there were considerably more of them prior to 2014 than today, and these observations make sense in light of the 2014 devaluation. This is probably the one issue here that I would quibble with AP on.

    His aunt's impressions are tilted by the fact that she went on the Metro very early. Who goes on the Metro very early? 1. People with utilities type jobs; 2. People who have an early flight. So, that's overwhelmingly (1). What are their demographics? Heavily Gastarbeiter, i.e. Central Asian.

    Incidentally, I am always amazed that there are people in Moscow who don't use the Metro (like AP's aunt). I don't know how you'd survive without it unless you're just permanently hunkered up in your apartment. But I actually know at least two people with similar profiles (i.e. who haven't used the Metro in years).

    3. His relatives are in the elite center of Moscow, which as you know is also where support for Putin falls while being one of the few places in Russia where support for liberals is not entirely negligible. This is perfectly plausible.

    As for the person with a managerial position in law enforcement who is living well beyond his apparent means... well, these people are a dime a dozen in Russia. Is this supposed to be incredible, or something? This is typical throughout the ex-USSR (except the Baltics and perhaps now Georgia), including the Ukraine.

    His “aunt” is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.

    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    An intelligent and well-travelled svidomy troll is still svidomy troll, and I’m surprised that you fall for his crap.

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    • Replies: @for-the-record
    his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    I think you are completely wrong there. I am a total "neutral" and found that his comment significantly enhanced my enthusiasm for revisiting Moscow after a lapse of 20 years. I wouldn't expect any review of a city to be 100% positive, and his" negative" points (corruption, presence of Asians) have been frequently confirmed by many Russians (on this site and elsewhere). What came through to me from his comment was an overall very positive view of the city.
    , @AP

    His “aunt” is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.
     
    Who said she was too poor to hire a taxi? Actually she mostly gets around by taxi (though her flat is on Tverskaya boulevard, not far from my brother-inlaw's place). She was one person who had some complaints about Sobyanin. As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places. So she ends up taking a taxi everywhere despite owning a nice car.

    And she is very race-consious despite her elite background.
     
    LOL. You think Russian elites are like American ones when it comes to this?

    It's not hard to notice what is going on in Paris and to make a funny joke when found in similar (though not common) situation in Moscow. Someone I know went to Paris once and never again because of what they saw.


    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts
     
    I've commented that Russia as a whole is more Muslim than any European country but I've stated that Moscow is about 80% Slavic, so hardly overrun. I might increase the Slavic estimate a little after this visit.
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  202. @Felix Keverich
    His "aunt" is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.

    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    An intelligent and well-travelled svidomy troll is still svidomy troll, and I'm surprised that you fall for his crap.

    his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    I think you are completely wrong there. I am a total “neutral” and found that his comment significantly enhanced my enthusiasm for revisiting Moscow after a lapse of 20 years. I wouldn’t expect any review of a city to be 100% positive, and his” negative” points (corruption, presence of Asians) have been frequently confirmed by many Russians (on this site and elsewhere). What came through to me from his comment was an overall very positive view of the city.

    Read More
    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia to begin with. For those here, who see Putin's Russia as a "Great White Hope", AP's comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    I don't care if AP made you curious about visiting Moscow, I take offence at his description of my country's capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That's a load of crap.
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  203. @for-the-record
    his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    I think you are completely wrong there. I am a total "neutral" and found that his comment significantly enhanced my enthusiasm for revisiting Moscow after a lapse of 20 years. I wouldn't expect any review of a city to be 100% positive, and his" negative" points (corruption, presence of Asians) have been frequently confirmed by many Russians (on this site and elsewhere). What came through to me from his comment was an overall very positive view of the city.

    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia to begin with. For those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”, AP‘s comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    I don’t care if AP made you curious about visiting Moscow, I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That’s a load of crap.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon

    those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”
     
    are foolish and probably irrelevant to actual Russia which is a nice place.

    I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That’s a load of crap.
     
    Overrun? He said Tajiks in Moscow are like Mexicans in NYC (I think). Nobody but a Bircher would consider that "overrun". Also that they are preferable to Caucasians, which you don't mention. If you want to portray Moscow as some sort of reinrassig white utopia that is at least equally mistaken.
    , @for-the-record
    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia

    Please do not misquote me. I never said that I didn't like Russia, on the contrary, and I know far more about it than most Westerners, indeed I think I probably hold the record for Westerners flying on Soviet aircraft (more than 300,000 km when I stopped counting).

    I am simply "neutral" in that I seek to keep on good terms with both Russians and Ukrainians.
    , @AP

    For those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”, AP‘s comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.
     
    My comments are intended to provide a reality-check for wishful thinkers who live in a fantasy world. The reality is that the least Muslim, most European places in the world are Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltics, and the Czech Republic (Hungary and Slovakia have a lot of gypsies).

    I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks.
     
    You have a habit of misquoting people. I will give you the benefit of the doubt and assume this is because you have gotten emotional, due to your nationalism. I stated that my aunt once got on the metro early in the morning and found herself on a train full of Tadjiks. I did not say Moscow was overrun by them. I estimated that about 10% of the city was Central Asians. This does not qualify as "overrun."

    I would also say that the Central Asians are mostly hardworking people who stay out of the way. One won't walk among them on the streets very much. In my week there I ran into one aggressive panhandling Central Asian, outside the metro station near the Andrei Rublev museum/monastery (a weird place for him to be), but overall they cause no trouble and Moscow is much more stress-free than any Western city I can think of.
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  204. The Kulak says:
    @Greasy William
    Conclusions:

    1. Russia won and it wasn't even close. The fact that the Russophiles (and even actual Russians like Anatoly) refuse to see that shows just how warped peoples brains are over all this nonsense.

    2. Assad is there forever and Russia is there forever.

    3. Yes Putin would have been within his rights to shoot down US/Western aircraft attacking Syria, but the Russian forces in theater would have been decisively crushed by the American response. At that point Putin would either have to admit defeat or launch WWIII.

    I get that the Unz commetariat would have preferred WWIII but Putin is a President, not a dictator. His clique has no desire to see the destruction of the earth so Putin did the right thing: take the win and play the long game.

    4. Regardless of what Trump says, the US is never leaving. Or at least not until the US dissolves in 20 years. If Putin/Syria/Iran attempts to respond to this incident by escalating against the SDF, there will simply be a Wagner redux. Magnier can write all the fan fiction he wants but Syria will never be whole again.

    5. The only reason the US launched this completely useless operation is because Trump had that Twitter meltdown. The strikes did nothing because they were designed to do nothing except for allow Trump's dumb ass to save some face. The next time Assad uses gas, there will be no US response. Trump has learned his lesson.

    6. Turkey supporting the US strikes cannot be seen as anything other than a huge diplomatic failure for Russia and a demonstration of just how fantastical the Saker/Magnier dream of Turkish/Russian alliance is. Erdogan is a delusional neo-Ottoman and he has no interest in being Putin's junior partner.

    7. 2020 is a long time away but Trump is headed towards re-election the same way he was last week. Russophiles live in a dream world where anymore than a handful of Americans care about Syria or Assad. "America First" meant anti immigration, anti trade and anti regime change. It never meant anti air strikes or anti police actions because Americans, even Trump voters, simply do not care about those things and nothing will ever change that. The Spencer, Duke, Ramzpaul and Cernovich types can say that they are taking their ball and going home but they said the exact same thing last year and such types account for maybe 10k total votes nationwide, and I'm being extremely generous with that number.

    Let me put it this way: if the US had proportional representation, a pro Syria party would not even get 0.5% of the vote.

    Nobody cares about Syria! Own your irrelevance.

    8. Lost in the commotion over these meaningless US air strikes is that Israel has launched yet another attack inside Syria on an Iranian base. That makes two large scale strikes inside Syria after just months ago the Russophiles had promised that Israeli air superiority was no more.

    The devastating Iranian response should be coming shortly.

    9. The Russophiles are really excited about word out our eternal, undivided capitol of Jerusalem that we have some concerns about the s-300. This is typical of the way that Russophile's just don't get Israeli politics:

    A. Israel complains every time any of it's enemies get any weapons. They went crazy when the US sold Saudi Arabia AWACS in the 80s, much more so then they are upset about the s-300s. They screamed bloody murder about Russia replenishing Assad Sr.'s SA-6's in the late 70's before the IAF effortless destroyed all of them in the 82 war. Israeli's just love to complain. Don't read too much into it.

    B. Russia has a history of jerking it's clients around when it comes to the s-300. They promise to sell it and then they never do. Doesn't happen always but it happens frequently and it will probably happen here.

    C. The IAF is well equipped to handle the s-300 and s-400. They've been drilling extensively against both systems for years. If Syria gets the s-300, and it probably wont', Israel will destroy it with the loss of few, if any, aircraft.

    ...

    So all in all, things are looking pretty good: Trump cruising to reelection, no escalation between Russia and the US, Syria remains permanently divided and all out war between Israel on one side and Syria/Iran/Hezbollah on the other is closer then ever.

    I ask again: what's not to like?

    You love to bash Magnier, but what is Trump who already wants US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs?

    Individuals such as yourself or to take a more extreme example, Michael Daeshbag Weiss, who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare. He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.

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    • Replies: @Greasy William

    You love to bash Magnier
     
    Because he likes to make up news. If Magnier didn't exist we would have to invent him. He is a caricature of a Russophile psuedo journalist. He writes fan fiction disguised as reporting and has thousands of people who continue to take his writings as accurate no matter how many times he is proven wrong (which lately has been about 2 times a week).

    Tell him to apologize for everything he has ever written and then to kill himself and I promise I will stop attacking him in Unz comment threads.

    Until then: learn to live with it.

    US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs
     
    It's not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn't 00's Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.

    Some US servicemen may get killed in the coming years. It's tragic but they will be richly rewarded in the World to Come for their holy work of killing Iranians and Syrians and, even more importantly, trolling Russophiles. Trump will be pissed but no matter how much he blusters the US Deep State will not allow him to leave. As for the US public, they don't give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn't going to happen.

    who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.
     
    Hey, now you're starting to get it!

    That's exactly how it's going to play out. Now in 20 years when the US is gone, your faggot Assad can have the Kurdish regions back, assuming us Jews haven't killed him and his family by then (probably not a safe assumption). But until then, Syrian Kurdistan is property of Uncle Sam. And thus it shall remain.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare.
     
    1. His fans have.
    2. Why not? The SAA and Hezbollah are unstoppable conventional forces according to him. They should certainly have no problem with the Turks at least.

    He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.
     
    He hasn't "implied" it, he's explicitly stated it about 5 times a week for the past 6 months. He does this either to gin up his donations from his delusional fans for his next book about how gay he is (or whatever it's about) or because he is trying to convince himself or some combination of both. But let's address this particular delusion:

    1. S Lebanon and Israel are such a totally different situation that we are truly in cloud cuckoo land here. I'm not even sure Mags has even said this; that's how stupid the comparison is.

    2. The Iraq comparison is more wrong than delusional, although it is still the latter. But that's Russophiles for you. The US troops are only 2000 and they are not responsible for security, that having been contracted out entirely to the Kurds and SDF. Their presence is overwhelmingly supported by the people where they (the US troops) are based. Basically it's the exact opposite of 00's Iraq.

    ...

    But since we're on the subject, let's look at Magnier's recent track record:

    1. He said that Syrian air defense shot down 2 jets when it was just 1 and has continued to tout that lie.

    2. He said that it was Israel that de escalated after the jet shoot down which was an amazingly brazen lie, even for him. So according to him, after Israel lost the jet they started promising murderous retaliation and then launched 2 of their heaviest strikes ever on Syria at which point they just chickened out and called Putin. If they wanted to de-escalte, why the Hell were they saying they wanted war? Why the fuck did they immediately launch their largest attacks ever on Syria? How is that de-escalating?

    What really happened: Israel was at the beginning stages of an operation to eliminate the entirety of Syria's air defenses at with point Putin called Israel, not the reverse, and ordered Israel to stand down. This was reported in all world media, including Russian. And yet Magnier sticks to his story even though it makes no fucking sense.

    3. He said that Syrian air defense had permanently defeated the IAF and that Israel would never attack targets by air inside Syria again. This led to a genuinely hilarious situation where Magnier live tweeted his own emotional breakdown when the IAF blasted T4 to Hell and killed 14 Iranian and Syrian dogs (with no retaliation... as usual). I'm going to assume you saw this sad/beautiful tweet storm so you know that it wasn't pretty. I'm pretty sure that Mags literally started crying. It was really funny.

    4. He said that nuclear war between Russia and the US was a virtual certainty and that Russia would launch WWIII in response to ANY US attack on Syria. There was no wiggle room about coordination with Russia or avoiding Russian bases. He said flat out: WWIII if the US attacks Syria. When Russia stood down, which he previously had promised that Russia would not do, he said that it was actually a victory for Russia (it technically was, but not by the ridiculous standards he himself had set before the strikes).

    5. Last night was yet another new low for him: He said that the Israeli attack last night was a sign of how scared Israel was and that every single Israeli missile had been intercepted.

    What really happened: Syrian air defense is so terrified of Israel that they got spooked by G-d knows what and launched a massive SAM barrage against... nothing. There was no Israeli attack. Somebody is scared alright, but it isn't Israel. Some serious projection by Magnier here.

    I do have to give the Syrian's some credit, however: by their own account they managed to successfully intercept 9 out of 0 missiles: a success rate of infinity. Way to go Syria! And thank you Elijah for your great reporting of this triumph.

    This fiasco demonstrates better the anything else how much credibility Syria and Magnier have when it comes to accurately reporting their military accomplishments.

    ...

    Magnier's gayness triggers me but that's my problem, not yours. If my tone is harsh, it's nothing personal. You seem like an okay guy and I'm not looking for a war of words.

    That said: enjoy the remaining time you have left with your Syrians.
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  205. Anon[198] • Disclaimer says:
    @Felix Keverich
    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia to begin with. For those here, who see Putin's Russia as a "Great White Hope", AP's comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    I don't care if AP made you curious about visiting Moscow, I take offence at his description of my country's capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That's a load of crap.

    those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”

    are foolish and probably irrelevant to actual Russia which is a nice place.

    I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That’s a load of crap.

    Overrun? He said Tajiks in Moscow are like Mexicans in NYC (I think). Nobody but a Bircher would consider that “overrun”. Also that they are preferable to Caucasians, which you don’t mention. If you want to portray Moscow as some sort of reinrassig white utopia that is at least equally mistaken.

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    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population. To suggest that there is any similarity between NYC and Moscow is to deliberately misrepresent the situation. This is what AP does: he is misrepresenting Moscow.

    I'm getting retorts from people, who haven't been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about. Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.
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  206. Talha says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    I don’t know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.
     
    Even my opulent American childhood looks poor compared to that of kids these days. Sometimes I waited a month until I got new shoes or a new coat. And I had to wait until Saturday morning to get my fill of cartoons. Now you point and click. Shoes and a coat are delivered in a box the next day, and any cartoon you want starts streaming.

    In my family, right now, I see only three checks on ego and appetite: 1) Orthodox Christian periods of fasting (similar to vegan diet, two days most weeks, and between two weeks and a month a few times a year), 2) living together as a family (to me, this is a big check on ego and appetite, since I have to constantly consider what my family needs rather than what I want), and 3) grit (we each have things that we want to accomplish and which require us to abstain from other things). So far, this keeps us from going completely off the rails. But I’m uncertain that it is enough, and I’m concerned about future generations. Already I am a grumpy old man, it seems...

    Bro, I have got the same concerns as you. I had a very similar upbringing as well. Since we were immigrants to the US, we did without a lot; just one present at birthdays, buying a bike on layaway, etc.

    I am looking forward to Ramadan this year probably more than any other. I cannot help but feel that this is not going to end well. I want to watch this documentary by Werner Herzog – I got to see the trailer:

    When I saw the last scene with the monks, I started crying – literally bawling, I couldn’t hold it back – a massive wave of horror and regret hit me all at once for what humanity has to lose as we cross the threshold…if we haven’t already.

    Peace.

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    • Replies: @The Big Red Scary
    Werner Herzog is usually interesting, and probably I'll eventually watch the film-- via the internet.

    However, the trailer at least seems to over state its case. Monks on twitter are clearly wasting their time, but a serious monastery or serious hermits would simply ban the use of social media. And there are still some examples of serious ascetics.

    Ultimately, the over-abundance of information needs to be treated like the over-abundance of sugar: practicing self-control. There are people who have serious problems with sugar and with obesity, and if those people reproduce more than others, that problem will become worse. But I suspect gorging on information decreases fertility. At least, it appears that wifi is better than sex, chocolate, and alcohol:

    https://www.cbronline.com/mobility/networks/wi-fi-better-than-sex-chocolate-alcohol/

    So maybe Darwin will sort this problem out.

    My wife and I at least make a point to shut off the information tap and talk to each other for a while before going to bed.

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  207. iffen says:
    @Felix Keverich
    You're overthinking it. Israel could not have anticipated that "Build the Wall" will become a rallying cry for racially anxious whites in GOP primaries. And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general - there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump's candidacy every step of the way.

    And this strategy of stirring white racial anxieties is dangerous for Jews in general – there is a reason why neoconservative (Jewish) elements of the GOP opposed Trump’s candidacy every step of the way.

    SJWs, Dems (but I repeat myself) and the MSM (again) are the ones stirring the racial stew, not Trump.

    Oh, and BTW, Trump is an archetype “great” nationalist leader. He demands total loyalty to himself while at the same time has no qualms about throwing absolutely anyone (loyal or not) overboard whom he considers a danger to his objectives. The only fly in the ointment is that sometimes what is best for the “leader” diverges from what is best for the nation.

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  208. @Felix Keverich
    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia to begin with. For those here, who see Putin's Russia as a "Great White Hope", AP's comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    I don't care if AP made you curious about visiting Moscow, I take offence at his description of my country's capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That's a load of crap.

    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia

    Please do not misquote me. I never said that I didn’t like Russia, on the contrary, and I know far more about it than most Westerners, indeed I think I probably hold the record for Westerners flying on Soviet aircraft (more than 300,000 km when I stopped counting).

    I am simply “neutral” in that I seek to keep on good terms with both Russians and Ukrainians.

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  209. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Yes, because "not a nationalist" is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?

    Yes, because “not a nationalist” is exactly the kind of person to travel all over the city, looking for signs of brown people.

    I notice what I see. What does this have to do with nationalism? Is everyone who notices a number of Arabs in Paris some sort of nationalist?

    You are projecting, Nationalist.

    Do you think my observations are mistaken, or even dishonest? If you are in Moscow, see who drives the Taxis. Who cleans the hotel rooms, works at construction sites, serves fast food. Doing the sorts of things Mexicans do. My estimate of 10% of the city being Central Asian is probably pretty close to the actual number. Portland OR is about 10% Mexican, so Moscow is about as Mexican as is Portland. It’s no LA. This is btw, much preferable to the situation in any western European big city.

    Also, were you just asking random Russians about their opinion on Putin? How else would you know that he is not particularly liked?

    I simply relayed what my family and friends thought of the man. Obviously this is not representative of the country as a whole. As my Titov-voting friend observed – the less one knows about what’s happening in the country, the more one likes Putin. With the exception of those who milk the country within the Putinist system, and are accordingly and understandably loyal to it and to the man who keeps it going..

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  210. AP says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    Nobody I met liked Putin very much other than my 2nd cousin who arrived from Ukraine in the early 90s
     
    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.

    Nobody I know actually likes Putin, but the reasons vary from the totally absurd to the completely reasonable.

    I don’t know much about Titov, and probably wouldn’t like that type in another country, but I do think that Russia in particular really does need more and better business.

    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.

    My circles are not representative of the country. All Moscow-based, mostly graduates of MGU or MGMO, all kids of Soviet-era elite with the exception of my cousin. Not involved in government but close enough to those who are to have a good clue. My friends who voted for Titov said something like, “if Putin shot or even at least arrested a lot of people at the top like they do in China I would have voted for him.” None of them like Sobchak either. Or Zhrinovsky, or the Communists. They really like Navalny’s exposes but dismiss him as someone who either lives off Western grants or who is a CIA asset, would never vote for him. All like getting Crimea back, none give a damn about Donbas.

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    • Replies: @The Big Red Scary

    All Moscow-based, mostly graduates of MGU or MGMO, all kids of Soviet-era elite with the exception of my cousin.
     
    Replace "elite" with "dissident academic" and you have my friends.

    Despite the popular approval it would generate, I'm not sure the time is yet ripe for a large number of arrests. Unlike in China, the center is weak. It will be interested to see what happens in the next few years.
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  211. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    His "aunt" is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.

    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts; trying to dampen the enthusiasm for Russia among the readers of unz.com

    An intelligent and well-travelled svidomy troll is still svidomy troll, and I'm surprised that you fall for his crap.

    His “aunt” is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.

    Who said she was too poor to hire a taxi? Actually she mostly gets around by taxi (though her flat is on Tverskaya boulevard, not far from my brother-inlaw’s place). She was one person who had some complaints about Sobyanin. As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places. So she ends up taking a taxi everywhere despite owning a nice car.

    And she is very race-consious despite her elite background.

    LOL. You think Russian elites are like American ones when it comes to this?

    It’s not hard to notice what is going on in Paris and to make a funny joke when found in similar (though not common) situation in Moscow. Someone I know went to Paris once and never again because of what they saw.

    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts

    I’ve commented that Russia as a whole is more Muslim than any European country but I’ve stated that Moscow is about 80% Slavic, so hardly overrun. I might increase the Slavic estimate a little after this visit.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor

    As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places.
     
    I know similar people complaining about similar measures in Budapest, but to be honest, I can hardly sympathize with them. Downtowns are much nicer pedestrianized.
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  212. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    That is your opinion, but as you say, you were never particularly enamoured with Russia to begin with. For those here, who see Putin's Russia as a "Great White Hope", AP's comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    I don't care if AP made you curious about visiting Moscow, I take offence at his description of my country's capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That's a load of crap.

    For those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”, AP‘s comments are intended to leave a shitty taste in their mouths.

    My comments are intended to provide a reality-check for wishful thinkers who live in a fantasy world. The reality is that the least Muslim, most European places in the world are Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltics, and the Czech Republic (Hungary and Slovakia have a lot of gypsies).

    I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks.

    You have a habit of misquoting people. I will give you the benefit of the doubt and assume this is because you have gotten emotional, due to your nationalism. I stated that my aunt once got on the metro early in the morning and found herself on a train full of Tadjiks. I did not say Moscow was overrun by them. I estimated that about 10% of the city was Central Asians. This does not qualify as “overrun.”

    I would also say that the Central Asians are mostly hardworking people who stay out of the way. One won’t walk among them on the streets very much. In my week there I ran into one aggressive panhandling Central Asian, outside the metro station near the Andrei Rublev museum/monastery (a weird place for him to be), but overall they cause no trouble and Moscow is much more stress-free than any Western city I can think of.

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  213. @AP

    His “aunt” is apparently too poor to hire taxi, but is very familiar with Paris. And she is very race-consious despite her elite background. She uses Metro once and ends up in a car full of DARK PEOPLE.
     
    Who said she was too poor to hire a taxi? Actually she mostly gets around by taxi (though her flat is on Tverskaya boulevard, not far from my brother-inlaw's place). She was one person who had some complaints about Sobyanin. As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places. So she ends up taking a taxi everywhere despite owning a nice car.

    And she is very race-consious despite her elite background.
     
    LOL. You think Russian elites are like American ones when it comes to this?

    It's not hard to notice what is going on in Paris and to make a funny joke when found in similar (though not common) situation in Moscow. Someone I know went to Paris once and never again because of what they saw.


    Come on, AP made this up! Moscow overrun by dark people is a consistent theme of his posts
     
    I've commented that Russia as a whole is more Muslim than any European country but I've stated that Moscow is about 80% Slavic, so hardly overrun. I might increase the Slavic estimate a little after this visit.

    As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places.

    I know similar people complaining about similar measures in Budapest, but to be honest, I can hardly sympathize with them. Downtowns are much nicer pedestrianized.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AP
    Oh, I agree. But I am a tourist without a car, not a long-time resident used to a certain way of moving around and having it taken away. For me, it's a big improvement. The Arbat used to stand out as a pedestrian street with nice architecture and shops (there were snips elsewhere, such as Kamergskiy Pereulok), now much of the center is like that.
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  214. AP says:
    @reiner Tor

    As a resident of the city center, she has a pass enabling her to park anywhere. But Sobyanin has pedestrianized much of the center and there are very few parking places.
     
    I know similar people complaining about similar measures in Budapest, but to be honest, I can hardly sympathize with them. Downtowns are much nicer pedestrianized.

    Oh, I agree. But I am a tourist without a car, not a long-time resident used to a certain way of moving around and having it taken away. For me, it’s a big improvement. The Arbat used to stand out as a pedestrian street with nice architecture and shops (there were snips elsewhere, such as Kamergskiy Pereulok), now much of the center is like that.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Though it's sometimes difficult for older people who have spent much of their lives there, the solution would be to sell the apartment (whose value probably appreciated considerably after pedestrianization), and move out somewhere. But yeah, people usually take their own situation as more important.

    It must be noted that a nice downtown increases life quality to all inhabitants of the city (not just tourists - and tourists bring money, so additional improvements), so the equation for the city as a whole is definitely positive in such cases.
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  215. @utu
    Relationship to the tap water in the US is different than in Europe. The US has higher standards and expectations. In the US people drink tap water straight while in Europe they boil it first. In the US nobody ever think of boiling it. In the US they get free glass of iced tap water in every restaurant. In Europe you pay for it and usually it is bottled water not tap water because it would have to be boiled first. It used to be mineral water with natural or artificial carbonation. The bottled non carbonated straight water with a guarantee that it is clean (bacteria free) is a more recent development which later also came to the US. Unfortunately this trend of bottled water is pushing out the tradition that you have a right to free glass of iced water. The right to ice water might be explained by the fact that America is much hotter and more humid in summer than Europe. Dehydration and heat stroke are more real here.

    In Hungary and, to my knowledge, most (all?) of Western and Central Europe people drink tap water regularly. I personally drink tap water all the time, and drank it as a child already, in Hungary and in any first world country. I think in Romania you can run into problems. I wouldn’t expect any problems in Slovakia (in fact, I did drink tap water in that country), Czechia, Poland, or similar countries.

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    • Replies: @utu
    I am not writing clearly apparently. There is a difference between Americans and Europeans in attitudes to tap water. It is historical. It is not about quality of water now which is good pretty much everywhere in Europe. In Europe it was drilled into people's heads to boil the water before drinking. People were boiling it anyway to make tea, coffee and whatnot. The point was that drinking straight from tap was not OK. The institution of water fountains did not exist.

    Why Germans Don’t Drink Tap Water
    https://language101.com/german/about-germany/why-germans-dont-drink-tap-water/

    The only water you can get it a restaurant will be bottled water with carbonation or bottled water without carbonation.

    The reason is at least in part the word for tap water. In English, lots of good things come from taps. Beer comes from a tap, soda can be on tap, and of course, the other meaning of tap, as in tap your fingers on the table is also positive.

    But the German word for tap water is Leitungswasser which literally means plumbing water. Now if you offered someone plumbing water, well that’s slightly better than sewer water but it isn’t something you would do.

    One of my biggest cultural mistakes in Germany was offering a friend of mine (who was probably very thirsty) a glass of ordinary tap water (Leitungswasser) and being surprised and somewhat offended when she wouldn’t take a sip.
     
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  216. @AP
    Oh, I agree. But I am a tourist without a car, not a long-time resident used to a certain way of moving around and having it taken away. For me, it's a big improvement. The Arbat used to stand out as a pedestrian street with nice architecture and shops (there were snips elsewhere, such as Kamergskiy Pereulok), now much of the center is like that.

    Though it’s sometimes difficult for older people who have spent much of their lives there, the solution would be to sell the apartment (whose value probably appreciated considerably after pedestrianization), and move out somewhere. But yeah, people usually take their own situation as more important.

    It must be noted that a nice downtown increases life quality to all inhabitants of the city (not just tourists – and tourists bring money, so additional improvements), so the equation for the city as a whole is definitely positive in such cases.

    Read More
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  217. Mr. Hack says:
    @joshuadelamere
    As AK says, I am not the same person...I was just replying to AK kindly linking my blog, that's all. I'll probably spill biographical info as I go along, but yes, I remain anonymous because I can't quit my day job yet.

    I wasn’t trying to undress your true identity, anymore than I was AP’s. I use a moniker myself and respect the privacy of all who choose to write under such an arrangement. What Karlin doesn’t understand, is that I’ve been communicating with AP for several years, at this blog and at others, where AP has used different monikers. AP is one of the better commentators at this blog, and it wouldn’t be at all surprising that he’d possibly want to start his own blog. There were several ‘false flags’ that he possibly could be you (I explain this in comment #53). After I found your blog, however, although impressed with what you have to say, your writing style is different than AP’s, thus my confusion.

    Anyway, I’m glad that I found your blog and indeed will read it with interest (I have an undergraduate degree in European history). I hope that you write something about Ukraine’s role as a colony (or something very similar to one) within the Russian empire and the Soviet Union, a place for which I hold a special interest!

    Read More
    • Replies: @joshuadelamere
    No harm at all; I read it as AK just strictly enforcing a sensible rule, as he ought. I understood what you were doing.

    I am familiar with Russian Imperial (and post-Imperial) colonialism. I will write about it and I think you're right to use the word "colony"; any reticence on the part of citizens of Western countries (or former Soviet countries) to use it is IMO a result of successful Soviet moralizing/positioning/propaganda. Prior to 1917, the case was the reverse and colonialism was a topic of discussion among administrative types.

    Here, for instance, a PhD talks about his experience trying to talk about colonialism with other Russian Imperial history colleagues: https://eurasianet.org/node/81726

    Anyway, my blog is going to be a slow burn for now as I roll out weekly; I have a day job that keeps me regularly submerged. Look out for something on the weekend.
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  218. @AP

    I’d be interested to hear their reasons for not liking Putin.
     
    My circles are not representative of the country. All Moscow-based, mostly graduates of MGU or MGMO, all kids of Soviet-era elite with the exception of my cousin. Not involved in government but close enough to those who are to have a good clue. My friends who voted for Titov said something like, "if Putin shot or even at least arrested a lot of people at the top like they do in China I would have voted for him." None of them like Sobchak either. Or Zhrinovsky, or the Communists. They really like Navalny's exposes but dismiss him as someone who either lives off Western grants or who is a CIA asset, would never vote for him. All like getting Crimea back, none give a damn about Donbas.

    All Moscow-based, mostly graduates of MGU or MGMO, all kids of Soviet-era elite with the exception of my cousin.

    Replace “elite” with “dissident academic” and you have my friends.

    Despite the popular approval it would generate, I’m not sure the time is yet ripe for a large number of arrests. Unlike in China, the center is weak. It will be interested to see what happens in the next few years.

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  219. S3 says:
    @The Big Red Scary

    I don’t know, but I know we are undergoing a massive unprecedented experiment.
     
    Even my opulent American childhood looks poor compared to that of kids these days. Sometimes I waited a month until I got new shoes or a new coat. And I had to wait until Saturday morning to get my fill of cartoons. Now you point and click. Shoes and a coat are delivered in a box the next day, and any cartoon you want starts streaming.

    In my family, right now, I see only three checks on ego and appetite: 1) Orthodox Christian periods of fasting (similar to vegan diet, two days most weeks, and between two weeks and a month a few times a year), 2) living together as a family (to me, this is a big check on ego and appetite, since I have to constantly consider what my family needs rather than what I want), and 3) grit (we each have things that we want to accomplish and which require us to abstain from other things). So far, this keeps us from going completely off the rails. But I’m uncertain that it is enough, and I’m concerned about future generations. Already I am a grumpy old man, it seems...

    Maybe you ought to do what Greg Cochran did and tell them to read up on WW2:

    westhunt.wordpress.com/2013/02/13/educating-ginny/

    Read More
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  220. @Anon

    those here, who see Putin’s Russia as a “Great White Hope”
     
    are foolish and probably irrelevant to actual Russia which is a nice place.

    I take offence at his description of my country’s capital as being overrun by Tadjiks. That’s a load of crap.
     
    Overrun? He said Tajiks in Moscow are like Mexicans in NYC (I think). Nobody but a Bircher would consider that "overrun". Also that they are preferable to Caucasians, which you don't mention. If you want to portray Moscow as some sort of reinrassig white utopia that is at least equally mistaken.

    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population. To suggest that there is any similarity between NYC and Moscow is to deliberately misrepresent the situation. This is what AP does: he is misrepresenting Moscow.

    I’m getting retorts from people, who haven’t been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about. Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.

    Read More
    • Troll: Mr. Hack
    • Replies: @AP

    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population
     
    He was talking about Mexicans, not Hispanics. Again, you lie about what others say.

    2010 census indicated 460,000 Mexicans in New York City, about 5.75% of the city's population. I'd guess Central Asians are about 10% of Moscow's population.

    I’m getting retorts from people, who haven’t been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about
     
    AK lives there. He mostly confirms what I observed.

    Do you live in Moscow? When were you there last?

    Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.
     
    Your posts indicate who is full of what.
    , @for-the-record
    Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit

    Again, as a "neutral" observer I must say that AP provides a whole lot more attractive impression of "Russia" than you do. Fortunately I know lots of Russians, so I realize that you're not really representative.
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  221. @The Kulak
    You love to bash Magnier, but what is Trump who already wants US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs?

    Individuals such as yourself or to take a more extreme example, Michael Daeshbag Weiss, who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare. He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.

    You love to bash Magnier

    Because he likes to make up news. If Magnier didn’t exist we would have to invent him. He is a caricature of a Russophile psuedo journalist. He writes fan fiction disguised as reporting and has thousands of people who continue to take his writings as accurate no matter how many times he is proven wrong (which lately has been about 2 times a week).

    Tell him to apologize for everything he has ever written and then to kill himself and I promise I will stop attacking him in Unz comment threads.

    Until then: learn to live with it.

    US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs

    It’s not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn’t 00′s Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.

    Some US servicemen may get killed in the coming years. It’s tragic but they will be richly rewarded in the World to Come for their holy work of killing Iranians and Syrians and, even more importantly, trolling Russophiles. Trump will be pissed but no matter how much he blusters the US Deep State will not allow him to leave. As for the US public, they don’t give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn’t going to happen.

    who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.

    Hey, now you’re starting to get it!

    That’s exactly how it’s going to play out. Now in 20 years when the US is gone, your faggot Assad can have the Kurdish regions back, assuming us Jews haven’t killed him and his family by then (probably not a safe assumption). But until then, Syrian Kurdistan is property of Uncle Sam. And thus it shall remain.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare.

    1. His fans have.
    2. Why not? The SAA and Hezbollah are unstoppable conventional forces according to him. They should certainly have no problem with the Turks at least.

    He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.

    He hasn’t “implied” it, he’s explicitly stated it about 5 times a week for the past 6 months. He does this either to gin up his donations from his delusional fans for his next book about how gay he is (or whatever it’s about) or because he is trying to convince himself or some combination of both. But let’s address this particular delusion:

    1. S Lebanon and Israel are such a totally different situation that we are truly in cloud cuckoo land here. I’m not even sure Mags has even said this; that’s how stupid the comparison is.

    2. The Iraq comparison is more wrong than delusional, although it is still the latter. But that’s Russophiles for you. The US troops are only 2000 and they are not responsible for security, that having been contracted out entirely to the Kurds and SDF. Their presence is overwhelmingly supported by the people where they (the US troops) are based. Basically it’s the exact opposite of 00′s Iraq.

    But since we’re on the subject, let’s look at Magnier’s recent track record:

    1. He said that Syrian air defense shot down 2 jets when it was just 1 and has continued to tout that lie.

    2. He said that it was Israel that de escalated after the jet shoot down which was an amazingly brazen lie, even for him. So according to him, after Israel lost the jet they started promising murderous retaliation and then launched 2 of their heaviest strikes ever on Syria at which point they just chickened out and called Putin. If they wanted to de-escalte, why the Hell were they saying they wanted war? Why the fuck did they immediately launch their largest attacks ever on Syria? How is that de-escalating?

    What really happened: Israel was at the beginning stages of an operation to eliminate the entirety of Syria’s air defenses at with point Putin called Israel, not the reverse, and ordered Israel to stand down. This was reported in all world media, including Russian. And yet Magnier sticks to his story even though it makes no fucking sense.

    3. He said that Syrian air defense had permanently defeated the IAF and that Israel would never attack targets by air inside Syria again. This led to a genuinely hilarious situation where Magnier live tweeted his own emotional breakdown when the IAF blasted T4 to Hell and killed 14 Iranian and Syrian dogs (with no retaliation… as usual). I’m going to assume you saw this sad/beautiful tweet storm so you know that it wasn’t pretty. I’m pretty sure that Mags literally started crying. It was really funny.

    4. He said that nuclear war between Russia and the US was a virtual certainty and that Russia would launch WWIII in response to ANY US attack on Syria. There was no wiggle room about coordination with Russia or avoiding Russian bases. He said flat out: WWIII if the US attacks Syria. When Russia stood down, which he previously had promised that Russia would not do, he said that it was actually a victory for Russia (it technically was, but not by the ridiculous standards he himself had set before the strikes).

    5. Last night was yet another new low for him: He said that the Israeli attack last night was a sign of how scared Israel was and that every single Israeli missile had been intercepted.

    What really happened: Syrian air defense is so terrified of Israel that they got spooked by G-d knows what and launched a massive SAM barrage against… nothing. There was no Israeli attack. Somebody is scared alright, but it isn’t Israel. Some serious projection by Magnier here.

    I do have to give the Syrian’s some credit, however: by their own account they managed to successfully intercept 9 out of 0 missiles: a success rate of infinity. Way to go Syria! And thank you Elijah for your great reporting of this triumph.

    This fiasco demonstrates better the anything else how much credibility Syria and Magnier have when it comes to accurately reporting their military accomplishments.

    Magnier’s gayness triggers me but that’s my problem, not yours. If my tone is harsh, it’s nothing personal. You seem like an okay guy and I’m not looking for a war of words.

    That said: enjoy the remaining time you have left with your Syrians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich
    I follow Magnier on Twitter. He is just like Debka-file, except he is pro-Hezbollah. They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East. Nothing to get worked up about.
    , @Jon0815

    It’s not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn’t 00′s Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.
     
    The US-controlled regions include a lot more than Kurdistan. Everything from Raqqa on south is majority-Arab. The only thing that really matters in eastern Syria is the oilfields, in particular the al-Omar oilfield, and those are all south of Raqqa.

    Once the SAA finishes mopping up the rebels in the west, and starts deploying tens of thousands of troops across the Euphrates from al-Omar, the USA will have three choices.

    1) Massively increase its troop strength in Syria, because airstrikes aren't going to stop 40,000 troops from overrunning 2000. This will be unpopular with the US public and will increase the number of targets for Hezbollah guerilla attacks.

    2) Face the constant prospect of being attacked and defeated in battle by Arabs.

    3) Go home (or at least, retreat north to Kurdistan).


    As for the US public, they don’t give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn’t going to happen.
     
    It only took 25 casualties to drive the USA from Somalia.
    , @Lemurmaniac
    lol yes i've noticed this too. Isn't he a Belgium? These sort of people find anti-imperialism as another means of being anti-white
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  222. @Greasy William

    You love to bash Magnier
     
    Because he likes to make up news. If Magnier didn't exist we would have to invent him. He is a caricature of a Russophile psuedo journalist. He writes fan fiction disguised as reporting and has thousands of people who continue to take his writings as accurate no matter how many times he is proven wrong (which lately has been about 2 times a week).

    Tell him to apologize for everything he has ever written and then to kill himself and I promise I will stop attacking him in Unz comment threads.

    Until then: learn to live with it.

    US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs
     
    It's not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn't 00's Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.

    Some US servicemen may get killed in the coming years. It's tragic but they will be richly rewarded in the World to Come for their holy work of killing Iranians and Syrians and, even more importantly, trolling Russophiles. Trump will be pissed but no matter how much he blusters the US Deep State will not allow him to leave. As for the US public, they don't give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn't going to happen.

    who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.
     
    Hey, now you're starting to get it!

    That's exactly how it's going to play out. Now in 20 years when the US is gone, your faggot Assad can have the Kurdish regions back, assuming us Jews haven't killed him and his family by then (probably not a safe assumption). But until then, Syrian Kurdistan is property of Uncle Sam. And thus it shall remain.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare.
     
    1. His fans have.
    2. Why not? The SAA and Hezbollah are unstoppable conventional forces according to him. They should certainly have no problem with the Turks at least.

    He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.
     
    He hasn't "implied" it, he's explicitly stated it about 5 times a week for the past 6 months. He does this either to gin up his donations from his delusional fans for his next book about how gay he is (or whatever it's about) or because he is trying to convince himself or some combination of both. But let's address this particular delusion:

    1. S Lebanon and Israel are such a totally different situation that we are truly in cloud cuckoo land here. I'm not even sure Mags has even said this; that's how stupid the comparison is.

    2. The Iraq comparison is more wrong than delusional, although it is still the latter. But that's Russophiles for you. The US troops are only 2000 and they are not responsible for security, that having been contracted out entirely to the Kurds and SDF. Their presence is overwhelmingly supported by the people where they (the US troops) are based. Basically it's the exact opposite of 00's Iraq.

    ...

    But since we're on the subject, let's look at Magnier's recent track record:

    1. He said that Syrian air defense shot down 2 jets when it was just 1 and has continued to tout that lie.

    2. He said that it was Israel that de escalated after the jet shoot down which was an amazingly brazen lie, even for him. So according to him, after Israel lost the jet they started promising murderous retaliation and then launched 2 of their heaviest strikes ever on Syria at which point they just chickened out and called Putin. If they wanted to de-escalte, why the Hell were they saying they wanted war? Why the fuck did they immediately launch their largest attacks ever on Syria? How is that de-escalating?

    What really happened: Israel was at the beginning stages of an operation to eliminate the entirety of Syria's air defenses at with point Putin called Israel, not the reverse, and ordered Israel to stand down. This was reported in all world media, including Russian. And yet Magnier sticks to his story even though it makes no fucking sense.

    3. He said that Syrian air defense had permanently defeated the IAF and that Israel would never attack targets by air inside Syria again. This led to a genuinely hilarious situation where Magnier live tweeted his own emotional breakdown when the IAF blasted T4 to Hell and killed 14 Iranian and Syrian dogs (with no retaliation... as usual). I'm going to assume you saw this sad/beautiful tweet storm so you know that it wasn't pretty. I'm pretty sure that Mags literally started crying. It was really funny.

    4. He said that nuclear war between Russia and the US was a virtual certainty and that Russia would launch WWIII in response to ANY US attack on Syria. There was no wiggle room about coordination with Russia or avoiding Russian bases. He said flat out: WWIII if the US attacks Syria. When Russia stood down, which he previously had promised that Russia would not do, he said that it was actually a victory for Russia (it technically was, but not by the ridiculous standards he himself had set before the strikes).

    5. Last night was yet another new low for him: He said that the Israeli attack last night was a sign of how scared Israel was and that every single Israeli missile had been intercepted.

    What really happened: Syrian air defense is so terrified of Israel that they got spooked by G-d knows what and launched a massive SAM barrage against... nothing. There was no Israeli attack. Somebody is scared alright, but it isn't Israel. Some serious projection by Magnier here.

    I do have to give the Syrian's some credit, however: by their own account they managed to successfully intercept 9 out of 0 missiles: a success rate of infinity. Way to go Syria! And thank you Elijah for your great reporting of this triumph.

    This fiasco demonstrates better the anything else how much credibility Syria and Magnier have when it comes to accurately reporting their military accomplishments.

    ...

    Magnier's gayness triggers me but that's my problem, not yours. If my tone is harsh, it's nothing personal. You seem like an okay guy and I'm not looking for a war of words.

    That said: enjoy the remaining time you have left with your Syrians.

    I follow Magnier on Twitter. He is just like Debka-file, except he is pro-Hezbollah. They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East. Nothing to get worked up about.

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    • Replies: @Talha

    They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East.
     
    Everyone makes up news - Arabs just really, really stink at it:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrXhxmQJSS0

    Peace.
    , @Greasy William
    Debka is Mossad funded psyops (and yet they still charge their gullible customers; stereotypes don't come from nowhere). They don't actually believe their own bullshit. Magnier is the real deal.

    for Felix and all the Russians here:

    Can you explain something to me?

    When I started posting on Unz, I was very anti Russia. This was due to a mixture of how much I couldn't stand The Saker*, how annoying Russophiles are, having spent years listening to Russian Jews go on endlessly about how awesome Russia is, the fact that I just had more energy back then and most of all, my assumption that Russians were all die hard Palestinian lovers.

    And it makes sense that I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level, and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    And yet when I look at public opinion polls, Russia is actually less anti Israel than most western European countries. Something doesn't add up. If Russians don't care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?


    *That was then. Since then I have learned to really appreciate him. He's a homosexual but even though I'm not big into the gay rights movement I'm not gonna hate the gay just because of something that he can't control.
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  223. Talha says:
    @Felix Keverich
    I follow Magnier on Twitter. He is just like Debka-file, except he is pro-Hezbollah. They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East. Nothing to get worked up about.

    They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East.

    Everyone makes up news – Arabs just really, really stink at it:

    Peace.

    Read More
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  224. Quite extraordinary interview with Lavrov on BBC yesrday (“Hard Talk), here is the transcript:

    http://www.mid.ru/en/foreign_policy/news/-/asset_publisher/cKNonkJE02Bw/content/id/3172318

    and an excerpt:

    Question: You know better than I that the OPCW has run tests in four different labs on the nerve agent used in Salisbury. All of them have concluded that that was a Novichok agent in a highly pure form as described by the British government.

    Sergey Lavrov: That’s a problem. First, the A-234 agent in highly pure form in high concentration is already raising suspicions.

    Question: It came from Russia. In the former Soviet Union, you invented that.

    Sergey Lavrov
    : Steven, you are not factual. You may be hard talking, but you are not listening. This chemical substance indeed was invented in the Soviet Union, then one the inventors fled to the United States and made the formula public. And if you want to check before raising the issue, please do so, the United States patented this formula; and it was formally taken by United States special services or the army, I don’t remember. But A-234 is a very light, I mean, it seriously damages a person, kills him of her, but it evaporates very fast; and the sample taken two weeks after the event cannot, according to our scientists, contain very high concentration.

    Question: I guess it’s all the question of credibility, and what you’re telling me, it may be credible for Russia; it’s certainly not credible around the world. See, you’ve had over a hundred diplomats expelled from over the twenty countries. It’s clear where the consensus lies. Russia is seen as culpable.

    Sergey Lavrov: If you want to finish the issue of the substance, on Saturday we presented a paper which contains, literally, the conclusion of the Swiss laboratory in the city of Spiez, which was one of the four laboratories, which did say that there were traces of A-234 of very high concentration, but they also said that there was…

    Question: I will use: you trust the OPCW or you don’t? It’s quite simple. You seem as you’re not saying you trust the OPCW.

    Sergey Lavrov: For a Brit, you have very bad manners. The Swiss laboratory report also said that, and in the first place, they found BZ, which was I think invented in the United States in 1955 and was among the equipment of the US and UK army. And we asked OPCW, whom we trust, whether this is true or not that in addition to A-234 there was also BZ discovered. And we are waiting a reply of OPCW, whom, of course, we trust, but we want trust and verify.

    Question: We’re almost out of time. I have to ask you about sanctions before we finish. The US Treasury Secretary is due to announce another raft of sanctions against Russian companies and individuals who are deemed to have contacts with the Syrian military. There are already over the past few weeks new sanctions from the United States on a whole bunch of different companies and individuals which have hit the Russian stock market very badly. Russia’s being squeezed.

    Sergey Lavrov: Thank you for your sympathy, but don’t worry, we will survive

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    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Re:BZ

    Statement of Spiez laboratory

    GENEVA, April 16. /TASS/. Spiez Laboratory’s Head of Strategy and Communication Andreas Bucher told TASS on Monday that he could not comment on information announced by Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on Saturday that the samples from Salisbury contained BZ nerve agent and its precursor, part of chemical arsenals of NATO countries.

    The laboratory "is contractually bound to the OPCW for confidentiality" and has no authority to make any statement on that, Bucher explained.

    "I’m sorry, we cannot have any statement on that, because as you are aware we are a designated laboratory of the OPCW, and the OPCW has rejected the Russian request for making public the involved designated laboratories in this Salisbury investigation," he explained. "And we are contractually bound to the OPCW for confidentiality. So the only institution who could confirm what Mister Lavrov was saying on the weekend is the OPCW. We cannot say, or confirm or deny anything," Bucher stressed.
     
    More:
    http://tass.com/world/1000017
    , @Randal

    Sergey Lavrov: For a Brit, you have very bad manners
     
    The "modern" view of the journalist class in the UK (and I think the US sphere generally) is that you must take sides, based upon supposedly objective morality. The old view that one should at least strive for the unachievable ideal of objectivity is seen as old fashioned and ethically compromising. In fact the opposite is the case, as you can see with this interview by Stephen Sackur, who is unable to let Lavrov present a case without making his own conviction as to the rightness of the British government story shine through.

    Sackur is experienced and intelligent (I do not know his personal biases, so I will not speculate), but he is basically corrupted as far as any possibility of reasonably objective journalism is concerned by his belief in the US sphere's propaganda and his adherence to the "modern" journalistic creed of taking the morally superior side. That much shines through in this interview.

    It comes across as rudeness, but it's more profound than that, really.
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  225. @Felix Keverich
    I follow Magnier on Twitter. He is just like Debka-file, except he is pro-Hezbollah. They both make up news. Apparently, this is standard practice in the Middle East. Nothing to get worked up about.

    Debka is Mossad funded psyops (and yet they still charge their gullible customers; stereotypes don’t come from nowhere). They don’t actually believe their own bullshit. Magnier is the real deal.

    for Felix and all the Russians here:

    Can you explain something to me?

    When I started posting on Unz, I was very anti Russia. This was due to a mixture of how much I couldn’t stand The Saker*, how annoying Russophiles are, having spent years listening to Russian Jews go on endlessly about how awesome Russia is, the fact that I just had more energy back then and most of all, my assumption that Russians were all die hard Palestinian lovers.

    And it makes sense that I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level, and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    And yet when I look at public opinion polls, Russia is actually less anti Israel than most western European countries. Something doesn’t add up. If Russians don’t care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?

    *That was then. Since then I have learned to really appreciate him. He’s a homosexual but even though I’m not big into the gay rights movement I’m not gonna hate the gay just because of something that he can’t control.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader

    and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.
     
    lol, do you really believe that? Is it true for US media?
    I don't read Russia today, but aren't they pretty much stuck in Soviet perceptions and modes of propaganda (e.g. pro-BLM because they think the "But you're lynching negroes!" line works to discredit the US)? So "antiimperialism" regarding the Palestine issue must come naturally to them. I don't think that says anything about its genuine popularity in Russia.
    , @Mitleser

    If Russians don’t care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?
     
    My guess: Staffed by leftist journalists.
    , @Dmitry

    And it makes sense that I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level, and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    And yet when I look at public opinion polls, Russia is actually less anti Israel than most western European countries. Something doesn’t add up. If Russians don’t care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?

     

    As you know already, RT is for international audiences, so tries to appeal to international tastes of audiences which is interested in Israel-Palestinian conflict (just look at this website).

    It's like a parallel of Radio «Svoboda» (which is part of US foreign policy) has different interests to the American media.

    -
    -
    -

    As for the Israel-Palestinian conflict in general. It's a very complicated topic, which - if you don't live in Israel - I can't see how anyone has patience to study it.

    In Russia, local media view changed on the issue over the last 15-20 years, going from very anti-Israel official position, to a more neutral position - as reflecting government positions.

    If you remember in 2014, was the last time there was a war between Israel and Gaza.
    You can see the television in 2014, tries to include both points of view. n 2014, the Israeli point of view was often included more than the Arab view. (This was partly a function of where reporters were based though).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RRfBF92DHI
    , @Jayce
    RT America and Sputnik are intended for foreign audiences obviously, the stuff Russians consume domestically is a lot different in content and tone. I know the Washington bureau is staffed by a lot of Green Party members and people who were well-known in leftist circles from the days of the WTO and Iraq protests. Earlier in the decade there used to be a sizeable libertarian element too, Richard Spencer was even a fairly regular guest commentator before the alt-right was a thing. They're more or less free to do whatever they want as long as it's outside the spectrum of mainstream politics and not openly critical of Russia. It certainly used to be a lot more interesting to watch, offbeat in the way public access TV used to be, but in the past few years it's become standardized and glossy.

    I don't get the impression from the places Russians gather online and talk politics that Israel vs Palestine is even much on their radar for the most part. Enthusiasm for "Axis of Resistance" stuff seems to be mostly a fetish of Westerners on the far-left and alt-right.
    , @utu

    I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level
     
    Are you crazy? RT and Sputnik are in general inept pussies on all issues and on Jews and Israel they are as PC as western MSM.

    I think Russia is wasting money on these two media outlets because they are just not good. Why don't they hire some people including Jews from Sky and Daily Mail and they would show them how to make real media. RT and Sputnik is supposed to be for foreigners not Russians, right? They can't use Soviet level propaganda of the type that our-shit-does-not -tink that possibly still works on some Russians like Martyanow or Keverich and expect results. But probably they do not expect any results otherwise they would have tried harder and they clearly do not. The usual Russian indolence? Sabotage? Who is holding their hands?
    , @iffen
    (and yet they still charge their gullible customers; stereotypes don’t come from nowhere)

    Two-fer.
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  226. @Greasy William
    Debka is Mossad funded psyops (and yet they still charge their gullible customers; stereotypes don't come from nowhere). They don't actually believe their own bullshit. Magnier is the real deal.

    for Felix and all the Russians here:

    Can you explain something to me?

    When I started posting on Unz, I was very anti Russia. This was due to a mixture of how much I couldn't stand The Saker*, how annoying Russophiles are, having spent years listening to Russian Jews go on endlessly about how awesome Russia is, the fact that I just had more energy back then and most of all, my assumption that Russians were all die hard Palestinian lovers.

    And it makes sense that I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level, and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    And yet when I look at public opinion polls, Russia is actually less anti Israel than most western European countries. Something doesn't add up. If Russians don't care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?


    *That was then. Since then I have learned to really appreciate him. He's a homosexual but even though I'm not big into the gay rights movement I'm not gonna hate the gay just because of something that he can't control.

    and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    lol, do you really believe that? Is it true for US media?
    I don’t read Russia today, but aren’t they pretty much stuck in Soviet perceptions and modes of propaganda (e.g. pro-BLM because they think the “But you’re lynching negroes!” line works to discredit the US)? So “antiimperialism” regarding the Palestine issue must come naturally to them. I don’t think that says anything about its genuine popularity in Russia.

    Read More
    • Agree: Anatoly Karlin
    • Replies: @songbird
    One of the main jobs of the CIA operating out of many US embassies abroad was to translate and summarize mainstream newspaper and magazine articles, in order to get a feel for what a regime was thinking. I think there are parallels to the West, even though the media isn't tightly controlled, their thoughts are naturally congruent with the political class.

    I believe it is also pretty meaningful that the enemies of the US never saw diversity as a strength, but practically as the only weakness they could exploit. For instance, when Iranians seized the hostages at the US embassy, there was a black Marine that they especially tried to split off. They were also happy to meet with Jessie Jackson.
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  227. lol, do you really believe that? Is it true for US media?

    The US media doesn’t really talk about Israel. This level of disinterest is a pretty accurate representation of the American public.

    In 2014, it was common to hear people complain not about the Israelis or Palestinians during the Gaza war, but rather to complain about the media for continuing to cover it when they wanted to hear about the Kardashians or whatever.

    I did an informal survey of people these last few days about the Syria strikes and most people I asked hadn’t even heard about them. The media here was basically like, “Yeah there are US strikes on Syria that could potentially lead to a clash with the world’s largest nuclear power but anyway, back to Mueller”.

    As for BLM, this is one of those things where polls and reality just don’t sync up. According to polls, 55% of American whites, not all Americans – just whites, support BLM. But any American, of any color, will tell you that that is bullshit.

    The most angry I have ever seen Americans get at the media was during the coverage of “Deflategate”, which you probably didn’t hear about in Europe. I won’t bother explaining it because it is so boring but absolutely nobody in the US cared about it and the media just would. not. stop. covering it.

    I’m not the type to complain about the media but even I was furious.

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    I think you are an antisemite pretending to be a supporter of Israeli.

    You are trying to make Israel look bad by doing a really bad job defending the Israeli point of view.
    , @reiner Tor

    “Deflategate”
     
    You just wasted twenty-seven seconds of my life by mentioning this, since I was compelled to look it up.

    To the others: don’t look it up, it really is uninteresting.
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  228. AP says:
    @Felix Keverich
    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population. To suggest that there is any similarity between NYC and Moscow is to deliberately misrepresent the situation. This is what AP does: he is misrepresenting Moscow.

    I'm getting retorts from people, who haven't been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about. Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.

    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population

    He was talking about Mexicans, not Hispanics. Again, you lie about what others say.

    2010 census indicated 460,000 Mexicans in New York City, about 5.75% of the city’s population. I’d guess Central Asians are about 10% of Moscow’s population.

    I’m getting retorts from people, who haven’t been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about

    AK lives there. He mostly confirms what I observed.

    Do you live in Moscow? When were you there last?

    Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.

    Your posts indicate who is full of what.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Felix Keverich

    AK lives there. He mostly confirms what I observed.
     
    What, he confirmed travelling in a subway car full of Tadjiks the other day? He confirmed that Moscow is "like Paris" in this respect? He confirmed that all the service jobs are held by brown people?

    You are very mendatious.


    He was talking about Mexicans, not Hispanics. Again, you lie about what others say.

    2010 census indicated 460,000 Mexicans in New York City, about 5.75% of the city’s population. I’d guess Central Asians are about 10% of Moscow’s population.
     

    Ukrainian logic:

    there are more Asians in Moscow, than Mexicans in NYC, which proves that Moscow is actually browner than NYC. As for millions of NY Latinos, who do not identify as "Mexican"...this is an entirely different breed of people, so it's plain unfair to bring them into this conversation!

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  229. Mitleser says:
    @Greasy William
    Debka is Mossad funded psyops (and yet they still charge their gullible customers; stereotypes don't come from nowhere). They don't actually believe their own bullshit. Magnier is the real deal.

    for Felix and all the Russians here:

    Can you explain something to me?

    When I started posting on Unz, I was very anti Russia. This was due to a mixture of how much I couldn't stand The Saker*, how annoying Russophiles are, having spent years listening to Russian Jews go on endlessly about how awesome Russia is, the fact that I just had more energy back then and most of all, my assumption that Russians were all die hard Palestinian lovers.

    And it makes sense that I would have thought that because RT and Sputnik are Der Sturmer level, and media is usually a pretty good reflection of public opinion in a country.

    And yet when I look at public opinion polls, Russia is actually less anti Israel than most western European countries. Something doesn't add up. If Russians don't care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?


    *That was then. Since then I have learned to really appreciate him. He's a homosexual but even though I'm not big into the gay rights movement I'm not gonna hate the gay just because of something that he can't control.

    If Russians don’t care about Israel, then why are RT and Sputnik so obsessed with it?

    My guess: Staffed by leftist journalists.

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  230. Mitleser says:
    @for-the-record
    Quite extraordinary interview with Lavrov on BBC yesrday ("Hard Talk), here is the transcript:

    http://www.mid.ru/en/foreign_policy/news/-/asset_publisher/cKNonkJE02Bw/content/id/3172318

    and an excerpt:

    Question: You know better than I that the OPCW has run tests in four different labs on the nerve agent used in Salisbury. All of them have concluded that that was a Novichok agent in a highly pure form as described by the British government.

    Sergey Lavrov: That's a problem. First, the A-234 agent in highly pure form in high concentration is already raising suspicions.

    Question: It came from Russia. In the former Soviet Union, you invented that.

    Sergey Lavrov
    : Steven, you are not factual. You may be hard talking, but you are not listening. This chemical substance indeed was invented in the Soviet Union, then one the inventors fled to the United States and made the formula public. And if you want to check before raising the issue, please do so, the United States patented this formula; and it was formally taken by United States special services or the army, I don't remember. But A-234 is a very light, I mean, it seriously damages a person, kills him of her, but it evaporates very fast; and the sample taken two weeks after the event cannot, according to our scientists, contain very high concentration.

    Question: I guess it's all the question of credibility, and what you're telling me, it may be credible for Russia; it's certainly not credible around the world. See, you've had over a hundred diplomats expelled from over the twenty countries. It's clear where the consensus lies. Russia is seen as culpable.

    Sergey Lavrov: If you want to finish the issue of the substance, on Saturday we presented a paper which contains, literally, the conclusion of the Swiss laboratory in the city of Spiez, which was one of the four laboratories, which did say that there were traces of A-234 of very high concentration, but they also said that there was…

    Question: I will use: you trust the OPCW or you don't? It's quite simple. You seem as you're not saying you trust the OPCW.

    Sergey Lavrov: For a Brit, you have very bad manners. The Swiss laboratory report also said that, and in the first place, they found BZ, which was I think invented in the United States in 1955 and was among the equipment of the US and UK army. And we asked OPCW, whom we trust, whether this is true or not that in addition to A-234 there was also BZ discovered. And we are waiting a reply of OPCW, whom, of course, we trust, but we want trust and verify.

    Question: We're almost out of time. I have to ask you about sanctions before we finish. The US Treasury Secretary is due to announce another raft of sanctions against Russian companies and individuals who are deemed to have contacts with the Syrian military. There are already over the past few weeks new sanctions from the United States on a whole bunch of different companies and individuals which have hit the Russian stock market very badly. Russia's being squeezed.

    Sergey Lavrov: Thank you for your sympathy, but don't worry, we will survive
     

    Re:BZ

    Statement of Spiez laboratory

    GENEVA, April 16. /TASS/. Spiez Laboratory’s Head of Strategy and Communication Andreas Bucher told TASS on Monday that he could not comment on information announced by Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov on Saturday that the samples from Salisbury contained BZ nerve agent and its precursor, part of chemical arsenals of NATO countries.

    The laboratory “is contractually bound to the OPCW for confidentiality” and has no authority to make any statement on that, Bucher explained.

    “I’m sorry, we cannot have any statement on that, because as you are aware we are a designated laboratory of the OPCW, and the OPCW has rejected the Russian request for making public the involved designated laboratories in this Salisbury investigation,” he explained. “And we are contractually bound to the OPCW for confidentiality. So the only institution who could confirm what Mister Lavrov was saying on the weekend is the OPCW. We cannot say, or confirm or deny anything,” Bucher stressed.

    More:

    http://tass.com/world/1000017

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  231. @Greasy William

    lol, do you really believe that? Is it true for US media?
     
    The US media doesn't really talk about Israel. This level of disinterest is a pretty accurate representation of the American public.

    In 2014, it was common to hear people complain not about the Israelis or Palestinians during the Gaza war, but rather to complain about the media for continuing to cover it when they wanted to hear about the Kardashians or whatever.

    I did an informal survey of people these last few days about the Syria strikes and most people I asked hadn't even heard about them. The media here was basically like, "Yeah there are US strikes on Syria that could potentially lead to a clash with the world's largest nuclear power but anyway, back to Mueller".

    As for BLM, this is one of those things where polls and reality just don't sync up. According to polls, 55% of American whites, not all Americans - just whites, support BLM. But any American, of any color, will tell you that that is bullshit.

    ...

    The most angry I have ever seen Americans get at the media was during the coverage of "Deflategate", which you probably didn't hear about in Europe. I won't bother explaining it because it is so boring but absolutely nobody in the US cared about it and the media just would. not. stop. covering it.

    I'm not the type to complain about the media but even I was furious.

    I think you are an antisemite pretending to be a supporter of Israeli.

    You are trying to make Israel look bad by doing a really bad job defending the Israeli point of view.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Talha
    No - he's just a really honest Jewish guy. I, for one, appreciate it.

    Peace.
    , @Anonymous
    But you don't tell us who you would bang.
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  232. @Greasy William

    lol, do you really believe that? Is it true for US media?
     
    The US media doesn't really talk about Israel. This level of disinterest is a pretty accurate representation of the American public.

    In 2014, it was common to hear people complain not about the Israelis or Palestinians during the Gaza war, but rather to complain about the media for continuing to cover it when they wanted to hear about the Kardashians or whatever.

    I did an informal survey of people these last few days about the Syria strikes and most people I asked hadn't even heard about them. The media here was basically like, "Yeah there are US strikes on Syria that could potentially lead to a clash with the world's largest nuclear power but anyway, back to Mueller".

    As for BLM, this is one of those things where polls and reality just don't sync up. According to polls, 55% of American whites, not all Americans - just whites, support BLM. But any American, of any color, will tell you that that is bullshit.

    ...

    The most angry I have ever seen Americans get at the media was during the coverage of "Deflategate", which you probably didn't hear about in Europe. I won't bother explaining it because it is so boring but absolutely nobody in the US cared about it and the media just would. not. stop. covering it.

    I'm not the type to complain about the media but even I was furious.

    “Deflategate”

    You just wasted twenty-seven seconds of my life by mentioning this, since I was compelled to look it up.

    To the others: don’t look it up, it really is uninteresting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @for-the-record
    To the others: don’t look it up, it really is uninteresting.

    On the contrary, apart from its inherent interest "Deflategate" has important ramifications far beyond the world of (American) professional football:

    Yes, I know that many people hate Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. And many others couldn’t care less that the National Football League deemed Brady a cheater, a liar and a perjurer over the silly Deflategate scandal. But that is why it makes an excellent case study of how a powerful institution and its clever lawyers can make almost nothing into almost anything and get many people to go along.

    Very similar techniques are used in more serious circumstances, such as the U.S. government and mainstream media demonizing some foreign leader in marching the American people in lockstep into another war.

    So, the moral behind the story of Brady and the NFL is that the public should be alert whenever some powerful institution lodges an accusation against some figure who is widely disliked. The troubling truth is that often a mob-like excitement overwhelms any skepticism, leaving the few doubters of the establishment’s claims labeled “apologists” and most everyone else going along . . .


    https://consortiumnews.com/2017/02/02/deflategate-cloud-over-the-super-bowl/
     
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  233. Talha says:
    @John Gruskos
    I think you are an antisemite pretending to be a supporter of Israeli.

    You are trying to make Israel look bad by doing a really bad job defending the Israeli point of view.

    No – he’s just a really honest Jewish guy. I, for one, appreciate it.

    Peace.

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    • Agree: reiner Tor
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  234. Anonymous[164] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Gruskos
    I think you are an antisemite pretending to be a supporter of Israeli.

    You are trying to make Israel look bad by doing a really bad job defending the Israeli point of view.

    But you don’t tell us who you would bang.

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  235. Jon0815 says:
    @Greasy William

    You love to bash Magnier
     
    Because he likes to make up news. If Magnier didn't exist we would have to invent him. He is a caricature of a Russophile psuedo journalist. He writes fan fiction disguised as reporting and has thousands of people who continue to take his writings as accurate no matter how many times he is proven wrong (which lately has been about 2 times a week).

    Tell him to apologize for everything he has ever written and then to kill himself and I promise I will stop attacking him in Unz comment threads.

    Until then: learn to live with it.

    US troops out going to do when IEDs start going off on roads near US FOBs
     
    It's not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn't 00's Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.

    Some US servicemen may get killed in the coming years. It's tragic but they will be richly rewarded in the World to Come for their holy work of killing Iranians and Syrians and, even more importantly, trolling Russophiles. Trump will be pissed but no matter how much he blusters the US Deep State will not allow him to leave. As for the US public, they don't give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn't going to happen.

    who imagine the US can stay forever behave as if the Euphrates River is some kind of magical force field against any Iraq insurgent style attack, or all the Arab tribes in the SDF with the Kurds will stay bought.
     
    Hey, now you're starting to get it!

    That's exactly how it's going to play out. Now in 20 years when the US is gone, your faggot Assad can have the Kurdish regions back, assuming us Jews haven't killed him and his family by then (probably not a safe assumption). But until then, Syrian Kurdistan is property of Uncle Sam. And thus it shall remain.

    Magnier never wrote that Damascus and Hezbollah would get the Americans much less the more casualty tolerant Turks out via conventional warfare.
     
    1. His fans have.
    2. Why not? The SAA and Hezbollah are unstoppable conventional forces according to him. They should certainly have no problem with the Turks at least.

    He has implied Hezbollah in S Lebanon vs Israelis and Iraq insurgency as the model.
     
    He hasn't "implied" it, he's explicitly stated it about 5 times a week for the past 6 months. He does this either to gin up his donations from his delusional fans for his next book about how gay he is (or whatever it's about) or because he is trying to convince himself or some combination of both. But let's address this particular delusion:

    1. S Lebanon and Israel are such a totally different situation that we are truly in cloud cuckoo land here. I'm not even sure Mags has even said this; that's how stupid the comparison is.

    2. The Iraq comparison is more wrong than delusional, although it is still the latter. But that's Russophiles for you. The US troops are only 2000 and they are not responsible for security, that having been contracted out entirely to the Kurds and SDF. Their presence is overwhelmingly supported by the people where they (the US troops) are based. Basically it's the exact opposite of 00's Iraq.

    ...

    But since we're on the subject, let's look at Magnier's recent track record:

    1. He said that Syrian air defense shot down 2 jets when it was just 1 and has continued to tout that lie.

    2. He said that it was Israel that de escalated after the jet shoot down which was an amazingly brazen lie, even for him. So according to him, after Israel lost the jet they started promising murderous retaliation and then launched 2 of their heaviest strikes ever on Syria at which point they just chickened out and called Putin. If they wanted to de-escalte, why the Hell were they saying they wanted war? Why the fuck did they immediately launch their largest attacks ever on Syria? How is that de-escalating?

    What really happened: Israel was at the beginning stages of an operation to eliminate the entirety of Syria's air defenses at with point Putin called Israel, not the reverse, and ordered Israel to stand down. This was reported in all world media, including Russian. And yet Magnier sticks to his story even though it makes no fucking sense.

    3. He said that Syrian air defense had permanently defeated the IAF and that Israel would never attack targets by air inside Syria again. This led to a genuinely hilarious situation where Magnier live tweeted his own emotional breakdown when the IAF blasted T4 to Hell and killed 14 Iranian and Syrian dogs (with no retaliation... as usual). I'm going to assume you saw this sad/beautiful tweet storm so you know that it wasn't pretty. I'm pretty sure that Mags literally started crying. It was really funny.

    4. He said that nuclear war between Russia and the US was a virtual certainty and that Russia would launch WWIII in response to ANY US attack on Syria. There was no wiggle room about coordination with Russia or avoiding Russian bases. He said flat out: WWIII if the US attacks Syria. When Russia stood down, which he previously had promised that Russia would not do, he said that it was actually a victory for Russia (it technically was, but not by the ridiculous standards he himself had set before the strikes).

    5. Last night was yet another new low for him: He said that the Israeli attack last night was a sign of how scared Israel was and that every single Israeli missile had been intercepted.

    What really happened: Syrian air defense is so terrified of Israel that they got spooked by G-d knows what and launched a massive SAM barrage against... nothing. There was no Israeli attack. Somebody is scared alright, but it isn't Israel. Some serious projection by Magnier here.

    I do have to give the Syrian's some credit, however: by their own account they managed to successfully intercept 9 out of 0 missiles: a success rate of infinity. Way to go Syria! And thank you Elijah for your great reporting of this triumph.

    This fiasco demonstrates better the anything else how much credibility Syria and Magnier have when it comes to accurately reporting their military accomplishments.

    ...

    Magnier's gayness triggers me but that's my problem, not yours. If my tone is harsh, it's nothing personal. You seem like an okay guy and I'm not looking for a war of words.

    That said: enjoy the remaining time you have left with your Syrians.

    It’s not gonna happen. Kurdistan isn’t 00′s Iraq. Any attempt by Hezbollah to make mischief in US controlled regions will earn a heavy price.

    The US-controlled regions include a lot more than Kurdistan. Everything from Raqqa on south is majority-Arab. The only thing that really matters in eastern Syria is the oilfields, in particular the al-Omar oilfield, and those are all south of Raqqa.

    Once the SAA finishes mopping up the rebels in the west, and starts deploying tens of thousands of troops across the Euphrates from al-Omar, the USA will have three choices.

    1) Massively increase its troop strength in Syria, because airstrikes aren’t going to stop 40,000 troops from overrunning 2000. This will be unpopular with the US public and will increase the number of targets for Hezbollah guerilla attacks.

    2) Face the constant prospect of being attacked and defeated in battle by Arabs.

    3) Go home (or at least, retreat north to Kurdistan).

    As for the US public, they don’t give a shit. If the fatalities are in the hundreds they might but that isn’t going to happen.

    It only took 25 casualties to drive the USA from Somalia.

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  236. Randal says:
    @for-the-record
    Quite extraordinary interview with Lavrov on BBC yesrday ("Hard Talk), here is the transcript:

    http://www.mid.ru/en/foreign_policy/news/-/asset_publisher/cKNonkJE02Bw/content/id/3172318

    and an excerpt:

    Question: You know better than I that the OPCW has run tests in four different labs on the nerve agent used in Salisbury. All of them have concluded that that was a Novichok agent in a highly pure form as described by the British government.

    Sergey Lavrov: That's a problem. First, the A-234 agent in highly pure form in high concentration is already raising suspicions.

    Question: It came from Russia. In the former Soviet Union, you invented that.

    Sergey Lavrov
    : Steven, you are not factual. You may be hard talking, but you are not listening. This chemical substance indeed was invented in the Soviet Union, then one the inventors fled to the United States and made the formula public. And if you want to check before raising the issue, please do so, the United States patented this formula; and it was formally taken by United States special services or the army, I don't remember. But A-234 is a very light, I mean, it seriously damages a person, kills him of her, but it evaporates very fast; and the sample taken two weeks after the event cannot, according to our scientists, contain very high concentration.

    Question: I guess it's all the question of credibility, and what you're telling me, it may be credible for Russia; it's certainly not credible around the world. See, you've had over a hundred diplomats expelled from over the twenty countries. It's clear where the consensus lies. Russia is seen as culpable.

    Sergey Lavrov: If you want to finish the issue of the substance, on Saturday we presented a paper which contains, literally, the conclusion of the Swiss laboratory in the city of Spiez, which was one of the four laboratories, which did say that there were traces of A-234 of very high concentration, but they also said that there was…

    Question: I will use: you trust the OPCW or you don't? It's quite simple. You seem as you're not saying you trust the OPCW.

    Sergey Lavrov: For a Brit, you have very bad manners. The Swiss laboratory report also said that, and in the first place, they found BZ, which was I think invented in the United States in 1955 and was among the equipment of the US and UK army. And we asked OPCW, whom we trust, whether this is true or not that in addition to A-234 there was also BZ discovered. And we are waiting a reply of OPCW, whom, of course, we trust, but we want trust and verify.

    Question: We're almost out of time. I have to ask you about sanctions before we finish. The US Treasury Secretary is due to announce another raft of sanctions against Russian companies and individuals who are deemed to have contacts with the Syrian military. There are already over the past few weeks new sanctions from the United States on a whole bunch of different companies and individuals which have hit the Russian stock market very badly. Russia's being squeezed.

    Sergey Lavrov: Thank you for your sympathy, but don't worry, we will survive
     

    Sergey Lavrov: For a Brit, you have very bad manners

    The “modern” view of the journalist class in the UK (and I think the US sphere generally) is that you must take sides, based upon supposedly objective morality. The old view that one should at least strive for the unachievable ideal of objectivity is seen as old fashioned and ethically compromising. In fact the opposite is the case, as you can see with this interview by Stephen Sackur, who is unable to let Lavrov present a case without making his own conviction as to the rightness of the British government story shine through.

    Sackur is experienced and intelligent (I do not know his personal biases, so I will not speculate), but he is basically corrupted as far as any possibility of reasonably objective journalism is concerned by his belief in the US sphere’s propaganda and his adherence to the “modern” journalistic creed of taking the morally superior side. That much shines through in this interview.

    It comes across as rudeness, but it’s more profound than that, really.

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    • Agree: dfordoom
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  237. utu says:
    @reiner Tor
    In Hungary and, to my knowledge, most (all?) of Western and Central Europe people drink tap water regularly. I personally drink tap water all the time, and drank it as a child already, in Hungary and in any first world country. I think in Romania you can run into problems. I wouldn't expect any problems in Slovakia (in fact, I did drink tap water in that country), Czechia, Poland, or similar countries.

    I am not writing clearly apparently. There is a difference between Americans and Europeans in attitudes to tap water. It is historical. It is not about quality of water now which is good pretty much everywhere in Europe. In Europe it was drilled into people’s heads to boil the water before drinking. People were boiling it anyway to make tea, coffee and whatnot. The point was that drinking straight from tap was not OK. The institution of water fountains did not exist.

    Why Germans Don’t Drink Tap Water

    https://language101.com/german/about-germany/why-germans-dont-drink-tap-water/

    The only water you can get it a restaurant will be bottled water with carbonation or bottled water without carbonation.

    The reason is at least in part the word for tap water. In English, lots of good things come from taps. Beer comes from a tap, soda can be on tap, and of course, the other meaning of tap, as in tap your fingers on the table is also positive.

    But the German word for tap water is Leitungswasser which literally means plumbing water. Now if you offered someone plumbing water, well that’s slightly better than sewer water but it isn’t something you would do.

    One of my biggest cultural mistakes in Germany was offering a friend of mine (who was probably very thirsty) a glass of ordinary tap water (Leitungswasser) and being surprised and somewhat offended when she wouldn’t take a sip.

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    • Replies: @Mitleser
    Yes, it is definitely a cultural issue in Germany.
    , @reiner Tor
    I did drink tap water in Germany, but maybe only because I’m Hungarian.

    In Hungary I know that most people do drink tap water. But you offer guests bottled water lest they think you are cheap. With close friends it’s unnecessary, and in any event people will very often tell you that tap water is at least as good and will choose it. (In Hungary tests found some of the bottled waters to be worse, containing less minerals etc. than tap water.)

    I thought that was the norm for most people in Western Europe, though maybe I’m wrong.
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  238. Mitleser says:
    @utu
    I am not writing clearly apparently. There is a difference between Americans and Europeans in attitudes to tap water. It is historical. It is not about quality of water now which is good pretty much everywhere in Europe. In Europe it was drilled into people's heads to boil the water before drinking. People were boiling it anyway to make tea, coffee and whatnot. The point was that drinking straight from tap was not OK. The institution of water fountains did not exist.

    Why Germans Don’t Drink Tap Water
    https://language101.com/german/about-germany/why-germans-dont-drink-tap-water/

    The only water you can get it a restaurant will be bottled water with carbonation or bottled water without carbonation.

    The reason is at least in part the word for tap water. In English, lots of good things come from taps. Beer comes from a tap, soda can be on tap, and of course, the other meaning of tap, as in tap your fingers on the table is also positive.

    But the German word for tap water is Leitungswasser which literally means plumbing water. Now if you offered someone plumbing water, well that’s slightly better than sewer water but it isn’t something you would do.

    One of my biggest cultural mistakes in Germany was offering a friend of mine (who was probably very thirsty) a glass of ordinary tap water (Leitungswasser) and being surprised and somewhat offended when she wouldn’t take a sip.
     

    Yes, it is definitely a cultural issue in Germany.

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  239. @Felix Keverich
    Hispanics are on the verge of overtaking whites as a share of NYC population. To suggest that there is any similarity between NYC and Moscow is to deliberately misrepresent the situation. This is what AP does: he is misrepresenting Moscow.

    I'm getting retorts from people, who haven't been to the city recently, and therefore have no idea what they are talking about. Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit.

    Trust me when I say that AP is full of shit

    Again, as a “neutral” observer I must say that AP provides a whole lot more attractive impression of “Russia” than you do. Fortunately I know lots of Russians, so I realize that you’re not really representative.

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  240. @reiner Tor

    “Deflategate”
     
    You just wasted twenty-seven seconds of my life by mentioning this, since I was compelled to look it up.

    To the others: don’t look it up, it really is uninteresting.

    To the others: don’t look it up, it really is uninteresting.

    On the contrary, apart from its inherent interest “Deflategate” has important ramifications far beyond the world of (American) professional football:

    Yes, I know that many people hate Tom Brady and the New England Patriots. And many others couldn’t care less that the National Football League deemed Brady a cheater, a liar and a perjurer over the silly Deflategate scandal. But that is why it makes an excellent case study of how a powerful institution and its clever lawyers can make almost nothing into almost anything and get many people to go along.

    Very similar techniques are used in more serious circumstances, such as the U.S. government and mainstream media demonizing some foreign leader in marching the American people in lockstep into another war.

    So, the moral behind the story of Brady and the NFL is that the public should be alert whenever some powerful institution lodges an accusation against some figure who is widely disliked. The troubling truth is that often a mob-like excitement overwhelms any skepticism, leaving the few doubters of the establishment’s claims labeled “apologists” and most everyone else going along . . .

    https://consortiumnews.com/2017/02/02/deflategate-cloud-over-the-super-bowl/

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  241. @utu
    I am not writing clearly apparently. There is a difference between Americans and Europeans in attitudes to tap water. It is historical. It is not about quality of water now which is good pretty much everywhere in Europe. In Europe it was drilled into people's heads to boil the water before drinking. People were boiling it anyway to make tea, coffee and whatnot. The point was that drinking straight from tap was not OK. The institution of water fountains did not exist.

    Why Germans Don’t Drink Tap Water
    https://language101.com/german/about-germany/why-germans-dont-drink-tap-water/

    The only water you can get it a restaurant will be bottled water with carbonation or bottled water without carbonation.

    The reason is at least in part the word for tap water. In English, lots of good things come from taps. Beer comes from a tap, soda can be on tap, and of course, the other meaning of tap, as in tap your fingers on the table is also positive.

    But the German word for tap water is Leitungswasser which literally means plumbing water. Now if you offered someone plumbing water, well that’s slightly better than sewer water but it isn’t something you would do.

    One of my biggest cultural mistakes in Germany was offering a friend of mine (who was probably very thirsty) a glass of ordinary tap water (Leitungswasser) and being surprised and somewhat offended when she wouldn’t take a sip.
     

    I did drink tap water in Germany, but maybe only because I’m Hungarian.

    In Hungary I know that most people do drink tap water. But you offer guests bottled water lest they think you are cheap. With close friends it’s unnecessary, and in any event people will very often tell you that tap water is at least as good and will choose it. (In Hungary tests found some of the bottled waters to be worse, containing less minerals etc. than tap water.)

    I thought that was the norm for most people in Western Europe, though maybe I’m wrong.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Greasy William

    In Hungary I know that most people do drink tap water.
     
    Gross. Do you use a filter at least?
    , @Talha

    Hungary tests found some of the bottled waters to be worse, containing less minerals etc. than tap water.)
     
    I would imagine, if the pipes aren't contaminated and the water supply is generally monitored, it is a good thing to drink the water from your locality. It just seems intuitive since our ancestors did that for centuries and the local minerals are what the body expects. No?

    Peace.
    , @utu
    Attitudes about drinking tap water keep changing. In the US it begins to go in the opposite direction and becoming more European. Thera are many factors. Bottle water became a "lifestyle defining product."

    We don’t trust drinking fountains anymore, and that’s bad for our health
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/we-dont-trust-drinking-fountains-anymore-and-thats-bad-for-our-health/2015/07/02/24eca9bc-15f0-11e5-9ddc-e3353542100c_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.b05486310421
    Fountains were once a revered feature of urban life, a celebration of the tremendous technological and political capital it takes to provide clean drinking water to a community. Today, they’re in crisis. Though no one tracks the number of public fountains nationally, researchers say they’re fading from America’s parks, schools and stadiums. “Water fountains have been disappearing from public spaces throughout the country over the last few decades,” lamented Nancy Stoner, an administrator in the Environmental Protection Agency’s water office. Water scholar Peter Gleick writes that they’ve become “an anachronism, or even a liability.” Jim Salzman, author of “Dr