The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersRussian Reaction Blog
The Return of the Eurasian Breadbasket
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

According to the latest estimates, Russia might harvest as much as 133 million tons of grain this year.

russia-grain-production

This would make 2017 a record harvest not just by post-Soviet standards, which were pretty dismal until the past decade, but relative to the RSFSR’s peak of 127.4mn tons in 1978.

(This is the case even after adjusting for Crimea’s absence from the RSFSR after 1954, since the parched peninsula only produces about a million tons of grain per year).

The US Department of Agriculture predicts that Russia will overtake the US and the EU to become the world’s largest single wheat exporter in 2017, accounting for a sixth of the world’s total and recovering its old Tsarist status as one of the world’s great breadbaskets.

world-grain-exports

Incidentally, if it were to also recover its Tsarist era borders, especially the Ukraine and Kazakhstan, it would account for about a third of world wheat exports.

One of the big proximate reasons for this are recent economic developments. Few sectors of the Russian economy have gained as much from the ruble devaluation and the sanctions as agriculture.

However, there are strong secular trends that Russia’s new breadbasket status is here to stay.

The world population is growing, and the climate is warming. This will raise global demand for calories, channeling investment into Russian agriculture, even as crop yields go up thanks to longer growing seasons and more atmospheric CO2, and previously inhospitable lands are opened up for agricultural exploitation.

burke-temperature-economy Russia is predicted to economically benefit more than any other country from global warming, and relatively speaking, agriculture can be expected to benefit more than any other sector. Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.

Russia is no longer the Soviet Union, where grain imports were running at 30 million tons by the 1980s – that is, about as much as just Russia by itself now exports – and draining the country of foreign currency. There are now many agricultural conglomerates competing in a free global market, responsive to price signals and intolerant of waste (about a quarter of the Soviet potato harvest rotted away in transportation). This is an opportunity that Russia will continue to exploit.

Minister of Agriculture Alexander Tkachev has suggested that in the future, Russian export earnings from grain exports may come to equal or even eclipse those from hydrocarbons, in effect fully returning Russia to its foreign trade position during late Tsarism.

This is unlikely any time soon. Even as late as 2015, Russia exported a total of $7.4 billion of crops, which is not only an order of magnitude lower than its $189 billion worth of hydrocarbons and minerals exports, but is not even sufficient to cover its $9.3 billion worth of crop imports (primarily vegetables and tropical crops like coffee and citrus fruits).

Nonetheless, both the global prices for and Russian production of grains is likely to continue soaring in the decades ahead. Meanwhile, the outlook for oil is far less certain. While the supergiants continue depleting rapidly, new extraction technologies have postponed the oil peak for an indeterminate number of future decades, and electric cars will increasingly bite away on the demand side. So Tkachev’s vision is not altogether fantastical.

 
• Category: Economics • Tags: Agriculture, Russia 
Hide 20 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Yeah. Unless Monsanto changes all that.

    Read More
    • Agree: melanf
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /akarlin/eurasian-breadbasket/#comment-2006670
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. Randal says:

    Russia is predicted to economically benefit more than any other country from global warming, and relatively speaking, agriculture can be expected to benefit more than any other sector. Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.

    Have the stupider fringes of the Russophobe media (the likes of Mensch and Ioffe) cottoned onto making global warming Russia’s fault yet? After all, cui bono?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    Have the stupider fringes of the Russophobe media (the likes of Mensch and Ioffe)
     
    Very wrong. They are NOT fringes--they are a mainstream. They are a concentrated embodiment of Western "Russia Studies" field.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Mr. XYZ says:

    I have a question–are future trends in Canada going to be similar to those in Russia?

    After all, Canada also has a lot of natural resources and it looks like global warming should also help it further develop its agriculture, no?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hieronymus of Canada
    I'm not sure about that. Most of Northern Canada is made of the Canadian Shield, a geologic province of worn down igneous and metamorphic rocks with little top soil, so even if they climate improves, the soil just isn't there. It might help the clay belt regions in Northern Ontario and Quebec, but those places are pretty small.

    For the most part, the big agricultural regions of the country is the St. Lawrence-Great Lakes lowlands and the Prairies, which are just the Northern extensions of the corresponding US regions, and I think they suffer the same problems that those regions face.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. @Randal

    Russia is predicted to economically benefit more than any other country from global warming, and relatively speaking, agriculture can be expected to benefit more than any other sector. Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.
     
    Have the stupider fringes of the Russophobe media (the likes of Mensch and Ioffe) cottoned onto making global warming Russia's fault yet? After all, cui bono?

    Have the stupider fringes of the Russophobe media (the likes of Mensch and Ioffe)

    Very wrong. They are NOT fringes–they are a mainstream. They are a concentrated embodiment of Western “Russia Studies” field.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    I think you misinterpreted my comment. I wasn't suggesting that the Russophobia they embody is fringe. Just that, in my experience, they are among the stupider fringe of those pushing said Russophobia. Though it's a while since I bothered to read much by Mensch and I've not followed Ioffe either apart from looking at her stuff when she was highlighted recently - I'm hoping Karlin has read them so I don't have to.

    Beneficiaries of positive discrimination and identity lobby influence, as well as the more old fashioned advantages women can have, imo.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Randal says:
    @Andrei Martyanov

    Have the stupider fringes of the Russophobe media (the likes of Mensch and Ioffe)
     
    Very wrong. They are NOT fringes--they are a mainstream. They are a concentrated embodiment of Western "Russia Studies" field.

    I think you misinterpreted my comment. I wasn’t suggesting that the Russophobia they embody is fringe. Just that, in my experience, they are among the stupider fringe of those pushing said Russophobia. Though it’s a while since I bothered to read much by Mensch and I’ve not followed Ioffe either apart from looking at her stuff when she was highlighted recently – I’m hoping Karlin has read them so I don’t have to.

    Beneficiaries of positive discrimination and identity lobby influence, as well as the more old fashioned advantages women can have, imo.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Andrei Martyanov

    they are among the stupider fringe of those pushing said Russophobia.
     
    Yes, I misinterpreted it. Having said that--from what I observed, the "smarter" part of Russophobes is kind of stupid too if we are to judge by the results. You know, like this famous scene from Fifth Element where they shoot everything they've got from their spaceship at that "thingy" which wants to destroy earth. Effect is very similar.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. @Randal
    I think you misinterpreted my comment. I wasn't suggesting that the Russophobia they embody is fringe. Just that, in my experience, they are among the stupider fringe of those pushing said Russophobia. Though it's a while since I bothered to read much by Mensch and I've not followed Ioffe either apart from looking at her stuff when she was highlighted recently - I'm hoping Karlin has read them so I don't have to.

    Beneficiaries of positive discrimination and identity lobby influence, as well as the more old fashioned advantages women can have, imo.

    they are among the stupider fringe of those pushing said Russophobia.

    Yes, I misinterpreted it. Having said that–from what I observed, the “smarter” part of Russophobes is kind of stupid too if we are to judge by the results. You know, like this famous scene from Fifth Element where they shoot everything they’ve got from their spaceship at that “thingy” which wants to destroy earth. Effect is very similar.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. Re: warming, the one that worries me is, doesn’t that also manifest in the fairly damaging droughts and heatwaves we’ve been suffering from lately? Or do you think its benefits for agriculture will outweigh the drawbacks in the long run?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jaakko Raipala
    Warmer oceans means more evaporation and overall a rainier planet, though of course local patterns will leave some regions drier.

    Google can help you to models, though of course these will have the double uncertainty of whether the precipitation model is accurate and whether the assumed amount of warming will actually happen. These guys have a map to offer:

    https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/will-the-wet-get-wetter-and-the-dry-drier/

    Rainfall is pretty relevant to the "will Siberia turn into an agricultural region" question that some were talking about as the problem with Siberia is not just that it's cold but that it's very dry given how far it is from the oceans (and given the westerly prevailing winds for relevant latitudes distance from the Atlantic counts the most). A warmer Arctic Ocean would mean a rainier Siberia but that increase in rainfall will mainly affect the northern regions that will still be too cold.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. anon says: • Disclaimer

    It is impressive.

    Farmers are pouring the profits from their ruble fueled windfall into machinery and land rationalization and much of those gains are permanent. That is, won’t need the currency tailwind to maintain current efficiency. Much of the cost of ruble devaluation is borne by consumers and they need attention at some point.

    Russia also has an abundance of natural gas which can be the primary input for nitrogen fertilizer. And massive deposits of potash.

    However, grain is a commodity and not what a developed economy needs as a basis for growth. You did the arithmetic and it simply can’t be enough. If they supplied 100% of the world’s exports it would still be less than than their hydrocarbon exports this year.

    As far as global warming … there is no need to depend on it — although Russia is geographically positioned for some benefit to the extent it occurs. My understanding is that ‘weather isn’t climate’ and the correct term is ‘climate CHANGE’ … just in case there is evidence to the contrary.

    There are benefits from a strong agricultural sector beyond the purely economic impact.

    I think it is more of a story of Russia having the institutional strength to respond rapidly to an economic opportunity. It isn’t that I explicitly thought it couldn’t be done — but actually accomplishing it increases confidence.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  9. @Mr. XYZ
    I have a question--are future trends in Canada going to be similar to those in Russia?

    After all, Canada also has a lot of natural resources and it looks like global warming should also help it further develop its agriculture, no?

    I’m not sure about that. Most of Northern Canada is made of the Canadian Shield, a geologic province of worn down igneous and metamorphic rocks with little top soil, so even if they climate improves, the soil just isn’t there. It might help the clay belt regions in Northern Ontario and Quebec, but those places are pretty small.

    For the most part, the big agricultural regions of the country is the St. Lawrence-Great Lakes lowlands and the Prairies, which are just the Northern extensions of the corresponding US regions, and I think they suffer the same problems that those regions face.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. @Daniil Adamov
    Re: warming, the one that worries me is, doesn't that also manifest in the fairly damaging droughts and heatwaves we've been suffering from lately? Or do you think its benefits for agriculture will outweigh the drawbacks in the long run?

    Warmer oceans means more evaporation and overall a rainier planet, though of course local patterns will leave some regions drier.

    Google can help you to models, though of course these will have the double uncertainty of whether the precipitation model is accurate and whether the assumed amount of warming will actually happen. These guys have a map to offer:

    https://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/will-the-wet-get-wetter-and-the-dry-drier/

    Rainfall is pretty relevant to the “will Siberia turn into an agricultural region” question that some were talking about as the problem with Siberia is not just that it’s cold but that it’s very dry given how far it is from the oceans (and given the westerly prevailing winds for relevant latitudes distance from the Atlantic counts the most). A warmer Arctic Ocean would mean a rainier Siberia but that increase in rainfall will mainly affect the northern regions that will still be too cold.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. notanon says:

    good stuff

    1) as the food industry in the West is poisoning everyone, if the sanctions allow Russia to maintain a healthy agriculture that will serve them well in the long term

    2) need to avoid letting outside agribusiness buy farmland for same reason – keep it collectively owned and lease it out to citizens on 100 year leases like Britain did after Black Death – long leases incentivize innovation while preventing the land being bought by outside corporations

    3) DOMES! – i want to see sci fi farming domes in the tundra – import Boer refugees to work them – cos it would be cool

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  12. notanon says:

    the hidden benefit of agriculture if it’s organised right i.e. prosperous family farms, is it can be a healthy baby factory

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  13. Who owns the land in Russia these days?

    Was it bought up by oligarchs? Have large corporations taken over. Or is there a new generation of kulaks?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  14. This kid is pretty good.

    [MORE]

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  15. Gerard2 says:

    You forgot to mention that this is despite of a disastrous summer, weather wise, across most of the main agricultural regions of Russia…. with flooding severely effecting the cop yield. Without this it would be even more

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  16. “Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.”

    You misspelled ‘conveniently’ or did you mean ‘conversely’?

    Russia is predicted to economically benefit more than any other country from global warming, and relatively speaking, agriculture can be expected to benefit more than any other sector. Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.

    Australia is a major player in agriculture? Didn’t know that.

    I don’t think global warming will affect most of US.
    Maybe California, but the Midwest, the breadbasket of the US, has hardly been affected by climate ‘change’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @üeljang
    Aussie beef is a well-known and popular imported product in Japan.

    From https://www.mla.com.au/marketing-beef-and-lamb/international-markets/japan/:

    MLA actively supports the marketing of Australian red meat in Japan and undertakes numerous marketing campaigns to encourage increased sales of Australian beef and lamb in this important market.

    Japan has been a critically important partner for the Australian beef industry, reigning as a top export destination since early 1990s, alongside the US. Japan is also the foundation of the Australian grainfed industry, consistently taking more than half of total grainfed beef shipments.

    Japan is also a key market for Australian lamb. Australian sheepmeat is served largely in the foodservice sector, but also seen at supermarkets.

    According to https://www.mla.com.au/prices-markets/overseas-markets/, Australia exported 70% of the volume of beef that it produced in the year 2016, with 26% of that 70% being exported to Japan, making Japan the number one importer of Aussie beef last year. Japan was closely followed by the USA (destination of 23.8% of the total export volume in 2016, a great reduction from the previous year) and Korea (destination of 17.7% of the total export volume in 2016). Judging from the other figures in this table, I suppose South Korea must have been the greatest importer of Aussie beef per capita last year.

    I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind as a "breadbasket" or a "major competitor" in agriculture with the aforementioned exception of the production of meat, and beef in particular.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. üeljang says:
    @Priss Factor
    "Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts."

    You misspelled 'conveniently' or did you mean 'conversely'?


    Russia is predicted to economically benefit more than any other country from global warming, and relatively speaking, agriculture can be expected to benefit more than any other sector. Meanwhile, conviently, major competitors such as Australia and the US will be wracked by droughts.

    Australia is a major player in agriculture? Didn't know that.

    I don't think global warming will affect most of US.
    Maybe California, but the Midwest, the breadbasket of the US, has hardly been affected by climate 'change'.

    Aussie beef is a well-known and popular imported product in Japan.

    From https://www.mla.com.au/marketing-beef-and-lamb/international-markets/japan/:

    MLA actively supports the marketing of Australian red meat in Japan and undertakes numerous marketing campaigns to encourage increased sales of Australian beef and lamb in this important market.

    Japan has been a critically important partner for the Australian beef industry, reigning as a top export destination since early 1990s, alongside the US. Japan is also the foundation of the Australian grainfed industry, consistently taking more than half of total grainfed beef shipments.

    Japan is also a key market for Australian lamb. Australian sheepmeat is served largely in the foodservice sector, but also seen at supermarkets.

    According to https://www.mla.com.au/prices-markets/overseas-markets/, Australia exported 70% of the volume of beef that it produced in the year 2016, with 26% of that 70% being exported to Japan, making Japan the number one importer of Aussie beef last year. Japan was closely followed by the USA (destination of 23.8% of the total export volume in 2016, a great reduction from the previous year) and Korea (destination of 17.7% of the total export volume in 2016). Judging from the other figures in this table, I suppose South Korea must have been the greatest importer of Aussie beef per capita last year.

    I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind as a “breadbasket” or a “major competitor” in agriculture with the aforementioned exception of the production of meat, and beef in particular.

    Read More
    • Replies: @European-American
    > I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind
    > as a “breadbasket” or a “major competitor” in agriculture

    Why not? Australia’s long been among the top 5 wheat exporters, top 10wheat producers. Last year it was 4th exporting and 9th producing country for wheat.

    AKarlin> if Russia were to also recover its Tsarist era borders,
    > especially the Ukraine and Kazakhstan, it would account for
    > about a third of world wheat exports.

    That’s a huge change from 2016, when they accounted for just a bit more than a 5th of wheat exports. Wheat production is highly variable from year to year, but still, that seems a massive change.

    By the way, let’s not forget that, in absolute production terms, the EU, China, and India are the top wheat producers, far above Russia and the US.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_wheat_production_statistics

    Below are the 15 countries that exported the highest dollar value worth of wheat during 2016:

    United States: US$5.4 billion (14.8% of total wheat exports)
    Canada: $4.5 billion (12.4%)
    Russia: $4.2 billion (11.6%)
    Australia: $3.6 billion (9.9%)
    France: $3.4 billion (9.3%)
    Ukraine: $2.6 billion (7.2%)
    Germany: $1.9 billion (5.3%)
    Argentina: $1.9 billion (5.1%)
    Romania: $1.3 billion (3.5%)
    Poland: $806.9 million (2.2%)
    Bulgaria: $767.7 million (2.1%)
    Kazakhstan: $685.1 million (1.9%)
    Lithuania: $594.4 million (1.6%)
    United Kingdom: $526 million (1.4%)
    Czech Republic: $494.4 million (1.4%)
    The listed 15 countries shipped 89.9% of all wheat exports in 2016 (by value).

    Among the above countries, the fastest-growing wheat exporters since 2012 were: Poland (up 158.1%), Romania (up 82.3%), United Kingdom (up 22.7%) and Czech Republic (up 15.7%).

    Those countries that posted declines in their exported wheat sales were led by: Kazakhstan (down -57.2%), Australia (down -46.9%), Argentina (down -36.7%), United States (down -34.4%) and France (down -33.3%).
    http://www.worldstopexports.com/wheat-exports-country/

     

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. @üeljang
    Aussie beef is a well-known and popular imported product in Japan.

    From https://www.mla.com.au/marketing-beef-and-lamb/international-markets/japan/:

    MLA actively supports the marketing of Australian red meat in Japan and undertakes numerous marketing campaigns to encourage increased sales of Australian beef and lamb in this important market.

    Japan has been a critically important partner for the Australian beef industry, reigning as a top export destination since early 1990s, alongside the US. Japan is also the foundation of the Australian grainfed industry, consistently taking more than half of total grainfed beef shipments.

    Japan is also a key market for Australian lamb. Australian sheepmeat is served largely in the foodservice sector, but also seen at supermarkets.

    According to https://www.mla.com.au/prices-markets/overseas-markets/, Australia exported 70% of the volume of beef that it produced in the year 2016, with 26% of that 70% being exported to Japan, making Japan the number one importer of Aussie beef last year. Japan was closely followed by the USA (destination of 23.8% of the total export volume in 2016, a great reduction from the previous year) and Korea (destination of 17.7% of the total export volume in 2016). Judging from the other figures in this table, I suppose South Korea must have been the greatest importer of Aussie beef per capita last year.

    I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind as a "breadbasket" or a "major competitor" in agriculture with the aforementioned exception of the production of meat, and beef in particular.

    > I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind
    > as a “breadbasket” or a “major competitor” in agriculture

    Why not? Australia’s long been among the top 5 wheat exporters, top 10wheat producers. Last year it was 4th exporting and 9th producing country for wheat.

    AKarlin> if Russia were to also recover its Tsarist era borders,
    > especially the Ukraine and Kazakhstan, it would account for
    > about a third of world wheat exports.

    That’s a huge change from 2016, when they accounted for just a bit more than a 5th of wheat exports. Wheat production is highly variable from year to year, but still, that seems a massive change.

    By the way, let’s not forget that, in absolute production terms, the EU, China, and India are the top wheat producers, far above Russia and the US.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_wheat_production_statistics

    Below are the 15 countries that exported the highest dollar value worth of wheat during 2016:

    United States: US$5.4 billion (14.8% of total wheat exports)
    Canada: $4.5 billion (12.4%)
    Russia: $4.2 billion (11.6%)
    Australia: $3.6 billion (9.9%)
    France: $3.4 billion (9.3%)
    Ukraine: $2.6 billion (7.2%)
    Germany: $1.9 billion (5.3%)
    Argentina: $1.9 billion (5.1%)
    Romania: $1.3 billion (3.5%)
    Poland: $806.9 million (2.2%)
    Bulgaria: $767.7 million (2.1%)
    Kazakhstan: $685.1 million (1.9%)
    Lithuania: $594.4 million (1.6%)
    United Kingdom: $526 million (1.4%)
    Czech Republic: $494.4 million (1.4%)
    The listed 15 countries shipped 89.9% of all wheat exports in 2016 (by value).

    Among the above countries, the fastest-growing wheat exporters since 2012 were: Poland (up 158.1%), Romania (up 82.3%), United Kingdom (up 22.7%) and Czech Republic (up 15.7%).

    Those countries that posted declines in their exported wheat sales were led by: Kazakhstan (down -57.2%), Australia (down -46.9%), Argentina (down -36.7%), United States (down -34.4%) and France (down -33.3%).

    http://www.worldstopexports.com/wheat-exports-country/

    Read More
    • Replies: @üeljang
    Australia is in fact a major exporter of wheat as well as one of beef and other meat. However, what I meant in my previous reply to Priss Factor is that I think most people are aware of the fact that most of Australia's land is very arid, and therefore it is difficult to imagine it being a major exporter of fruits, vegetables, sugarcane, rice, etc., especially when considered in proportion to its total land area.

    At present, meat (foremost among members of that category being beef by a great margin, though with sheep and goat meat also being significant) is the most important agricultural export of Australia. Wheat follows that at a great distance. The third most important category of agricultural exports from the country is intimately connected with the meat industry: animal hair (including wool).

    Meat and animal hair are not the first products associated in my mind with the word "breadbasket."

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  19. üeljang says:
    @European-American
    > I do agree that Australia is not the first country that comes to mind
    > as a “breadbasket” or a “major competitor” in agriculture

    Why not? Australia’s long been among the top 5 wheat exporters, top 10wheat producers. Last year it was 4th exporting and 9th producing country for wheat.

    AKarlin> if Russia were to also recover its Tsarist era borders,
    > especially the Ukraine and Kazakhstan, it would account for
    > about a third of world wheat exports.

    That’s a huge change from 2016, when they accounted for just a bit more than a 5th of wheat exports. Wheat production is highly variable from year to year, but still, that seems a massive change.

    By the way, let’s not forget that, in absolute production terms, the EU, China, and India are the top wheat producers, far above Russia and the US.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_wheat_production_statistics

    Below are the 15 countries that exported the highest dollar value worth of wheat during 2016:

    United States: US$5.4 billion (14.8% of total wheat exports)
    Canada: $4.5 billion (12.4%)
    Russia: $4.2 billion (11.6%)
    Australia: $3.6 billion (9.9%)
    France: $3.4 billion (9.3%)
    Ukraine: $2.6 billion (7.2%)
    Germany: $1.9 billion (5.3%)
    Argentina: $1.9 billion (5.1%)
    Romania: $1.3 billion (3.5%)
    Poland: $806.9 million (2.2%)
    Bulgaria: $767.7 million (2.1%)
    Kazakhstan: $685.1 million (1.9%)
    Lithuania: $594.4 million (1.6%)
    United Kingdom: $526 million (1.4%)
    Czech Republic: $494.4 million (1.4%)
    The listed 15 countries shipped 89.9% of all wheat exports in 2016 (by value).

    Among the above countries, the fastest-growing wheat exporters since 2012 were: Poland (up 158.1%), Romania (up 82.3%), United Kingdom (up 22.7%) and Czech Republic (up 15.7%).

    Those countries that posted declines in their exported wheat sales were led by: Kazakhstan (down -57.2%), Australia (down -46.9%), Argentina (down -36.7%), United States (down -34.4%) and France (down -33.3%).
    http://www.worldstopexports.com/wheat-exports-country/

     

    Australia is in fact a major exporter of wheat as well as one of beef and other meat. However, what I meant in my previous reply to Priss Factor is that I think most people are aware of the fact that most of Australia’s land is very arid, and therefore it is difficult to imagine it being a major exporter of fruits, vegetables, sugarcane, rice, etc., especially when considered in proportion to its total land area.

    At present, meat (foremost among members of that category being beef by a great margin, though with sheep and goat meat also being significant) is the most important agricultural export of Australia. Wheat follows that at a great distance. The third most important category of agricultural exports from the country is intimately connected with the meat industry: animal hair (including wool).

    Meat and animal hair are not the first products associated in my mind with the word “breadbasket.”

    Read More
    • Agree: European-American
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. The famines were caused by Jewish communists who tried to starve the Russians.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Anatoly Karlin Comments via RSS